You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Mister Jim’ tag.

The Narrows is a prime location for me to get photos of vessels coming in from sea if they have AIS because I have several hours notice of arrival for any traffic going anywhere into or through the Upper Bay, eg., on their way to Brooklyn berths, the North River, or the East River.  I can walk around or–in case of rain or cold–sit in my car.

The downside is that it’s a wide spot, so even the zoom can draw in only limited detail.

Having said all that, here’s a shot from Bay Ridge over to the Sandy Hook Pilots station, showing (from far to near) the current black hull-yellow trimmed pilot boat mother ship New York No. 1, its eventual replacement currently with a blue hull, and the smaller boats.  Lop off the thin upper wheelhouse and paint the hull/trim, and make a thousand more modifications . . .  and you’ll have the new mother ship.

My goal was to get photos of Commander Iona, which I did and posted here. Unexpected was the arrival of Dina Polaris, which I’d first seen only a month and a half or so ago.

 

Mister Jim has been a regular on this blog and in the sixth boro surrounding waters since she first arrived a few years ago.

 

The Severn Sailing Association came through the rain with a whole host of sloops . . . from closest to farthest:  Commitment, Intrepid, Valiant, Courage, Invincible, Renaissance, Daring, Brave, Warrior.

Rhea I. Bouchard headed in with her barge, but by this time the rain was falling so hard I couldn’t confirm the name/number on the barge.

Magdalen headed out, passing a sloop and

R/V Heidi Lynn Scuthorpe, a first sighting for me.

Click here for more info on Heidi Lynn and Monmouth University’s Urban Coast Institute. Click here for a more technical article from Workboat on this vessel.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who feels compensated for staying out in the rain.

I saw Nauvoo (Heidi Lynn‘s previous name) years back and I posted a pic here.  I also saw Beglane.

Here are all the previous installments of this series.

Glenn Raymo caught this photo up the Hudson the other day, as Joker assisted a Weeks crane.  Hays tugs do come up here occasionally, but I’ve never seen them.

Back almost exactly six years ago, the same boat headed upriver as a dead ship.  And eight years ago, working for a different company and painted in a different livery, here she was . . .  2011, eastbound in the KVK.

Justin Zizes was coming down the Hudson recently and caught this spring-evoking photo of Nathan G, her gray livery and aggregate cargo set off by the hint of leaves on the tree-lined far shore.

Thanks to Justin also for this photo of Mister Jim in her homeport in Coeymans.

Jan van der Doe sent these photos along of a group of northern European tugs at work, taken in early April by Jan Oosterboer, not far from Rotterdam.

Mutratug 32 is a Carrousel Rave tug, which means she rotate her point of attachment to better brake the assisted vessel.  To see her in action, click here.

And finally, see the tugs in this photo I took on the East River the other day?  Two of them?

Thomas J. Brown is obvious and always a delight to see.  But then there’s Bosco on the barge.  I believe she was heading for a job on the Hutchinson River.

Thanks to Glenn, Justin, Jan, and Jan for photos here.

 

Years ago when Odin departed the sixth boro, someone said there’d likely never be another tug here of that sort.  Well, there is.  Every time I see either CMT Otter or Pike, I recall the unique Odin.

In CMT colors, Otter looks quite sharp.

Also in these sharp colors, it’s Daisy Mae westbound in the KVK a few days ago, pushing CMT Y NOT 2 with a good 8000 tons of southern Jersey sand.

I have an article about the sand run that will be published later this year.

Eastbound at the same point on another day is Mister Jim pushing

a barge deeply laden with aggregates.

And still fresh from a rehab, it’s Helen Laraway, ISO

a barge to load up with aggregates as well.   Here was probably the first photo of Helen Laraway on this blog.

CMT . . . the company had no tugs, actually was no company, just a half decade ago.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

It might as well be spring already.  Well, maybe my wish is that spring were here.  I heard a spurious claim on a TV I visited the other day that March 20 is the planetary beginning of spring in the north but March 1 is the meteorological start of spring.  But it must be true since I heard it on TV!??

But pairs, not Paris.  Capt. Brian and Charles D. . . .  interesting pair showing evolution of design 50 over the half century between the launch of each.

Fells Point landed Doubleskin 302 with Stephen B doing assist.  That’s the first I seen Stephen B in the assist role.

Miss Julia could be Dylan Cooper‘s workboat.

CF Campbell heads east passing Scott Turecamo/New Hampshire and then

makes for the Upper Bay, where JRT is assisting Orange Blossom 2, herself a bloom in the dawn light.   The photo above and the one below I took less than a minute apart, yet you’d think the light was saying hours separated the two.

Kimberly passes Eric.

Marie J Turecamo and Mister Jim run side by side under the Bayonne Bridge.  Does anyone know when the pedestrian walkway on the bridge will open?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Kirby Moran and James D Moran wait, like a team of horses, actually a team of 12,000 horses.

Here’s a different perspective on Kirby as she returns from a job.

CMT Otter and a salt barge lies alongside Nord Summit while along the other side, the venerable Twin Tube reprovisions from stern starboard.

Atlantic Salvor (or Enterprise??)  . . . I’ll never catch up as she heads for one of the many skylines of Brooklyn.  By the way, has anyone caught a photo of Hunter D in the sixth boro?

With Shooters Island and beyond that the cranes of Howland Hook in the background, it’s Discovery Coast, these days somewhat rare in the sixth boro.

Mister Jim is looking sharp these days, much better than her earlier livery.

Kodi is quite far away here, but she is a mere 42.6 footer.

Bering Dawn . . . she’s been on the East Coast some time now,

but all told, she’s spent more time on the West Coast.

The elusive Thomas stopped by the salt pile the other morning to retrieve a crane.

Margaret Moran . . . as always assisting ships into and out of the sixth boro.  More Margaret soon.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Seeing a tugboat on a mooring in the sixth boro is unusual, in my experience, and I took many shots.  This is my favorite.

Neptune the other morning headed for sea along the sylvan banks of Staten Island.

James E. Brown moves a scow, likely to be filled with scrap metals.

Brian Nicholas travels to a job  . . . that’s New Jersey off her starboard.

JRT Moran crosses the Upper Bay enroute to an assist.

Genesis Eagle travels along Brooklyn’s Owl’s Head.

One almost has the illusion here that Emily Ann is on assist with that tanker.  Almost.

Mister Jim lighters salt

from SBI Phoebe.

Sea Lion heads out of her base to grab  . . . a recycling barge perhaps.

And Atlantic Salvor continues shuttling dredge spoils from somewhere off the bottom of the North River.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

This is day 3, the Rondout brought a surprising visitor in the form of

Kalmar Nyckel.  When I’m back, I’ll do a whole post of this vessel.

These photos are included chronologically, so you’d be correct to conclude that north of the Rondout there are signs of nature.   Foreign mariners especially must be surprised by all these critters.

 

The port of Coeymans always has activity, briefly docked here are Mister Jim

and James Turecamo.

Betty D is southbound just below the Federal Lock at Troy.

x

Once in the Canal, we are treated to many boats, including Governor Cleveland, 

BB 109, 

and Day Peckinpaugh.  Farther west, we pass the

Mohawk Harbor, the former Alco plant, dominated by the cube that is Walthousen reactor. 

and a self-propelled scow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’ll explain this photo and the title at the end of this post.

The big move began yesterday on schedule, timed with the tides, I was told, to fit the cargo under some of the Hudson River bridges . . .

The cargo was gussied up with sponsors much like you’d see on a NASCAR racer.

 

Three tugs accompany the Mormac 400 barge.

On the stern were Daisy Mae and Mister Jim.

Underneath the entire cargo were tires;  I counted about 32 “axles,” each with with duals, and I’m not sure how many sets of duals across there are.  Maybe someone has the correct number.

 

After getting photos in New Baltimore, I crossed the river and got the rest of these in Hudson NY.

On the bow, CMT Pike (1979) guides the load.

Mister Jim (1982) and Daisy Mae (2017) power the tow from the stern.

Here, unfortunately backlit, the tow passes the Hudson-Athens Light.  

Hudson has quite the interesting history, and a spectator I talked with said the port missed becoming the state capital by three votes.  The architecture of the town is visit-worthy.

So you might still be wondering about the title and the top photo.  Here’s the story:  as I focused on taking the photos in Hudson, on the shore with a dozen other folks, I heard a chant.  “USA USA USA” from a group of kids who were in the park enjoying the beautiful spring weather.  I can’t say how the chanting started, but they were certainly looking at this large cargo and noticing the “union made in the USA” sign, and pumping their arms, dancing, and chanting loud enough to get a reaction from some folks on the tugs.  My guess is that it was spontaneous.  As a friend of mine would say:  “Neat!!”

And the cargo, here’s an informative article from Workboat.  It’s a heat-recovery steam generator bound for Bridgeport CT;  as of this writing (0515 Tuesday), the tow is approaching Newburgh.  The schedule has it at the GW at 1700 this afternoon and anchored at the Statue by 2000 (8 pm), departing for the East River at 0300 Wednesday.

The photo below offers a view from the stern of Mister Jim, thanks to Ashley Hutto.

For some previous interesting cargoes moved by CMT tugs, click here (for beer) and here (for a previous HRSG).

Let’s start with two photos thanks to Ashley Hutto, first one from last year.  Remember the HRSG aka “the cyclops” that came down the Hudson?  Tomorrow, another is scheduled to start a journey, then heads for Bridgeport.

Mister Jim above and below as platform, as well as Daisy Mae in the distance, will be involved in the transfer.  By Tuesday late afternoon, the HRSC is scheduled to be at the GW Bridge, and will overnight near the Statue of Liberty before entering the East River and into the Sound.  I’ll miss most of it, since I’ll be in Albany all next week.

No . . . I’m not entering politics.

Another unusual visitor was captured here by Tim Hetrick;  Megan Beyel passes Storm King here, towing a barge upriver.  The photo effectively shows the scale of Storm King.

OSVs like Megan Beyel are quite rare in the Hudson Valley, but they do appear. Four years ago Michael Lawrence spent some time in and out of the sixth boro working on a pipeline project.

Of course, there is a sixth boro quasi-resident OSV . . .  Rana Miller.

 

Rana‘s frequent mission is transporting Yokohamas, used to fender tankers transferring product offshore.

 

And from rubber to rubber, here’s a small USN tug moving rendering barrier around.  This photo comes from George Schneider, who writes, “Your photo (scroll) represents the smallest of them, the 19-footers, [like this one] one towing fender-style booms  (barriers?), but they also work as gate boats for the anti-swimmer booms  (barriers?) mentioned.  As you can see this one is officially designated 19BB0212, but has the local designation BB4.  They adopt some of the jargon from their origins as log broncs  (and scroll to Skillful) and call them “Beaver Boats” to differentiate them from the other boats designed to transport or place the light oil pollution booms.   This one was built by Chuck’s Boat and Drive Company (“C-Bad”) of Longview, WA, who also built 25-foot version for the Navy.  I imagine you’d find them at just about any station where the Navy ties up their ships.  At least 12 of the 19-footers and at least 22 of the 25-footers have been built for the Navy, as well as other designs that begin to look more like conventional pushboats as they grow in size. ”  Thanks much, George.

Finally, thanks to Steve Munoz, another one of these small tugs, this one spotted near the USS Constitution in Charlestown MA.

Many thanks to Ashley, Tim, George, and Steve for the photos and info.  The photos of Rana Miller by Will Van Dorp.

I appreciate it when folks send in photos they’ve taken.  Sharing photos is one of the joys of the Internet.

Here from Ashley Hutto, Mister Jim pushing five barges, upbound through the Highlands.  If you could swivel the camera to the right, you’d be looking at West Point.  I love the reality-defying lens.

The next two photos come from Phil Porteus . . .  you’re looking across a scrap barge at a set of barges filled with special Delaware Bay sand heading west in the  KVK and

pushed by the fairly new Daisy Mae.

From Jake van Reenen, this is what a small tug looks like on an Interstate, in this case before heading north mostly on I-95.  Photo taken in Miami.

From Sean McQuilken, it’s commissioning time for

USS Ralph Johnson, its namesake being a 19-year-old Marine who died in Vietnam in March 1968, a half century ago.

And last but not at all least, thanks to Hugo Sluimer via Fred Trooster, it’s the “US pilot boat” Elbe on the hard near Rotterdam.  Post-publication note:  Elbe WAS a pilot boat in the US, but she was way way more.  See here.

Many thanks to Ashley, Phil, Sean, and Fred.

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,297 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Recent Comments

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

July 2019
M T W T F S S
« Jun    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031