You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Mister Jim’ tag.

I appreciate it when folks send in photos they’ve taken.  Sharing photos is one of the joys of the Internet.

Here from Ashley Hutto, Mister Jim pushing five barges, upbound through the Highlands.  If you could swivel the camera to the right, you’d be looking at West Point.  I love the reality-defying lens.

The next two photos come from Phil Porteus . . .  you’re looking across a scrap barge at a set of barges filled with special Delaware Bay sand heading west in the  KVK and

pushed by the fairly new Daisy Mae.

From Jake van Reenen, this is what a small tug looks like on an Interstate, in this case before heading north mostly on I-95.  Photo taken in Miami.

From Sean McQuilken, it’s commissioning time for

USS Ralph Johnson, its namesake being a 19-year-old Marine who died in Vietnam in March 1968, a half century ago.

And last but not at all least, thanks to Hugo Sluimer via Fred Trooster, it’s the “US pilot boat” Elbe on the hard near Rotterdam.  Post-publication note:  Elbe WAS a pilot boat in the US, but she was way way more.  See here.

Many thanks to Ashley, Phil, Sean, and Fred.

 

Thanks to Ashley Hutto, here’s a salt ship lightering in the Upper Bay.

The ship–Sadlers Wells–has since departed for Houston.  I took the photo below, and all the others, on Monday.   That’s Mister Jim and barge alongside.  I’m curious about the name, given its association with an English theater opened in 1683 by a Richard Sadler.

I didn’t immediately notice that the blue stack logo was made up of four P’s canted so as to look like blades of a propeller.

Panstellar, a fabulous name, was also here discharging salt.  Click here to see the rest of the “pan-” fleet.

Seaenvoy is less than a year old.  I don’t know if the bow design is an upcoming trend.

 

It has since departed for Amsterdam.

Chemical Hunter–an intriguing namegets around for a smallish chemical tanker.

 

Pacific Jewels arrived here from Venezuela.

Overseas New York, a Jones Act tanker,  was launched in Philadelphia in 2008.

George Washington Bridge, despite a sixth boro sounding name, is a “K” Line vessel. 

Thanks to Ashley for for first photo;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

Just to reiterate . . . random in the sixth boro these are.  And the other day, I felt blessed for reasons you’ll understand by the end of this post.  Here Atlantic Enterprise emerges from the Arthur Kill and heads for home in Newark Bay.  That church, “a scaled down copy of the great cathedral at Cologne,” makes this seem quite a European-inflected image.

I took all these photos that weather day last week . . . note how the rain in downtown Elizabeth washes out the Union County Courthouse tower.

A bit later Mister Jim enters the east end of the Kills and then

feigns a ship assist.

The mighty Patricia travels east for a scrap run.

 

as Janet D moves in the direction

of her base.

Why did I feel blessed . . . ?  In the same but of morning, I saw both Atlantic Enterprise and Atlantic Salvor

although not in the same frame, they must have met up in the DonJon yard over in Port Newark.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

For both photos today, thanks to Ashley Hutto.    When the air is much warmer than the water, Helen Laraway may look like this.

And when it’s just plain cold and clear, Mister Jim in broken and refrozen ice looks like this.  For a look at how Mister Jim looked just a year and a half ago, click here and scroll.

Here’s some Great Lakes icebreaking, and here’s a lot of foggy tugster posts.

And from exactly nine years ago as a plane-fishing Flight 1549 operation was going on, what a miracle that was!

Many thanks again to Ashley for sharing these photos.

This is the second of three digressions I’m making from the GWA series, and what a digression it is.

How can one postpone posting these photos of the largest ever single unit transported by barge down the Hudson!  And with outstanding photos like these.  By the way, the first two, by Glenn Raymo are available to purchase here.

I post about this cargo, which has been covered extensively on FB, because not everyone enters the labyrinth called FB.

Two of the same tugs made the high profile tow to Rochester via the Erie Canal earlier this year as seen here.

When this tow entered the Kills, many hours later, the passed the salt pile,  where Brian DeForest took these shots.

Click on the photo below to read the banner, part of which says “union built in the USA.”

Hats off to all involved.  Many thanks to Glenn and Brian for photos I couldn’t chase.

Click here for more prints by Glenn.

Previous photos of Mister Jim here, CMT Otter here, and Helen Laraway here.

First, thanks to Peter Eagleton, Philip T Feeney in the 1970s.  I haven’t the heart to go see her in her current condition.

Next, Miss Ila, resplendent as a springtime cardinal!

Haggerty Girls nudging RTC 107 out of the Kills,

 

Helen Laraway passing TS Kennedy over by ConHook,

James William leaving Mister Jim over by the scows,

James E. Brown taking some rail cars past a wall of containers . . .

and finally . . . is that Durham setting up Willy Wall?  Is that what it’s still called?

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, except that first one supplied by Peter, whom I thank.

Know this New York NY boat?

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How about this one?

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Know this background?

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The one above is Taft Beach in lower Newark Bay and that’s the Union County (NJ) Courthouse prominent in the distance.  Below that’s Captain D on garbage detail.

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I’ve no idea what’s making that brilliant flash behind Joyce D. Brown . . . unless it’s another one of those supertall buildings springing up in Manhattan.   I guess “supertall towers” supersedes “skyscraper.”

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It’s Pegasus and

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Charles A and

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Genesis Vision.  Know her former name?  It’s here . . . the top of the Great Lakes.

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OK, so the “B” in the first photo is a vestige of Banda Sea.  See the complete name in raised letters in this post (scroll) from 2009.

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And Capt. Jason looks like this.  Know it?

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Yup, Mister Jim with the paint still drying.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Well well well . . . the paint confused me here, until

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I gt the name board . . . Mister Jim working while transforming.  Click here for a winter photo of Mister Jim.

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Weddell Sea I’ve not seen in a while. And her barge looks to be undergoing a paint change as well.

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Here’s my first glance close up of the stack of

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Barry Silverton.

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Silverton appears to belong to a different fleet than the Harley tugs that’ve been here for almost 10 years, like HMS St. Andrews.

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Brendan Turecamo here is rushing past CMA CGM Corneille to assist from starboard.  Here’s a Brendan Turecamo photo from almost 10 years ago.   Here’s more on CMA CGM Corneille, and if you want a refresher on who Pierre Corneille was, click here.  Recently the sixth boro has seen other c-ships named for writers like Herman Hesse and Ernest Hemingway.

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Closing this post out . . .it’s Jonathan C Moran, moving a tanker out.  More on this tanker soon.  But

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my photo below shows Jonathan C Moran on her christening day, less than two months ago.

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s a seldom-seen tugboat, delivered in 1977 by Gladding Hearn, who builds everything from rowboats to pilot boats to tugboats . . .   it’s Tappan Zee II, 

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dedicated to serving the bridges  (for now, plural) and waters called the Tappan Zee.  In the distance is the renowned Left Coast Lifter.

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Here’s a photo of Patriot, which had a mishap the next day from when I took the photo.

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Here’s Fred Johannsen, formerly known as Marco Island.

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Here comes Kimberly Poling with Edwin A. Poling, rounding the bend between West Point and Garrison.   Can anyone identify the yellow/tan house on the ridge line?

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In roughly the same location, it’s Mister Jim with some very deep stone scows.

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And I’ll end today’s post with an unidentified tugboat near Newburgh.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s back in the sixth boro but recapitulating the trip west . . . a task which could take a month.

I hope to see some of you at the screening of Graves of Arthur Kill at the the Staten Island ferry terminal on August 13.

 

 

Given the history and range of projects of Elsbeth II, you might imagine how thrilled I was to see her for the first time yesterday.  And she has to be among a small set of working vessels based in North America with brightwork!  She truly fits under the category exotic.

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I saw this tugboat six years ago in the Delaware River, but Sarah D looks spanking new  in NYS Marine Highway colors.

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Happy flag day.  Do you know the significance of this date?

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OSG Courageous, she’s one large tugboat and an infrequent

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visitor in this port.  I can’t quite make out the barge name. Of course, she’s not as colossal as her big sister –OSG Vision–who spent some time here . . . four (!!) years ago.

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Sassafras is a fixture in the sixth boro, but she rarely looks as good as she does when many shore dwellers in the other boros are just waking up.  Here she

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lies alongside Petali Lady.

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Mister Jim here is lightering (?) bulker Antigoni B, who seems to have since headed upriver.

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And since this is called random tugs, let me throw in two photos from the Digital collections of the New york State archives . . . SS Brazil entering the sixth boro on May 31, 1951.  What the photo makes very clear to me is how much traffic in the harbor has changed in 65 years.   Can anyone identify the six tugboats from at least three different companies here?  I can’t.

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Here the party passes a quite different looking Governors Island.

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All photos except for the last two by Will Van Dorp.  These last two come from a treasure trove aka Digital Collections of the New York State Archives. 

Unrelated:  If you’re free Saturday, it’s the annual mermaid migration on Coney Island.

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

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My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

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