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The sixth boro–just like those other ones–is a crossroads.  In just a short span of time,  boats from Texas (note the Great Loop pennant on the bow)  and

Quebec pass . . . and they’re soon out of sight and gone.  But occasionally,

boats pass through, singly or in twos, and

you can follow their journey, as is the case with TwoTugsTravelin’     aka Sally W and Salty Paws,  who  hope to do the miniloop and be back through NYC in mid July, by way of the Canal, Lake Ontario, Rideau Canal by June 19, Ottawa River by the 28th, and the Richelieu by July 3.  And then in Maine waters

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by early August, by which time I hope the sun’s out.  Happy traveling’…

Thanks to Glenn Raymo for the two photos directly above.

The others by Will Van Dorp, who invites any bloggers traveling interesting waterways this summer to get in touch.  Here’s a cruiser going up the Pacific side of Central America.

 

This is my Janus post . . . which I’ll start with a photo I took in January 2007 of an intriguing set of sculptures, since licensed to Trinity Church in Manhattan.

Since I’ve tons to do today, comment will be minimal.  The photo below I took near the KVK salt pile on January 14, 2016.  Eagle Ford, to the right, has since been scrapped in Pakistan.

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The history of Alnair, photo taken in Havana harbor on February 4, 2016, is still untraced.  It looks like an ex-USN tug.  Click here for more Cuban photos.

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This photo of JRT Moran and Orange Sun I took on March 12.

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This photo of Hudson was taken in Maassluis, very near where my father grew up,  on April 4. Many more Maassluis photos can be found here.

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Sandmaster I photographed here on May 6.  since then, she’s moved to Roatan, I’m told, and I’d love to go there and see how she’s doing.  Maybe I can learn some Garifuna while I’m there.

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June 1, I took this, with Robert E. McAllister and an invisible Ellen escorting Maersk Idaho out the door.

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July 14, I saw GL tug Nebraska yank bulkier Isolda with 56,000 tons of corn through a narrow opening and out the Maumee.

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August 23 I caught Atlantic Sail outbound past a nearly completed Wavertree.  And come to think of it, this is a perfect Janus photo.

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September 9 at the old port in Montreal I caught Svitzer Montreal tied up and waiting for the next job.

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October 18, I caught Atlanticborg and Algoma Enterprise down bound between Cape Vincent and Clayton NY.

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November 4, while waiting for another tow, I caught Sarah Ann switching out scrap scows in the Gowanus.

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And I’ll end this retrospective Janus post with a mystery shot, which I hope to tell you more about in 2017.  All I’ll say is that I took it yesterday and can identify only some of what is depicted. Anyone add something about this photo?

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I feel blessed with another year of life, energy, gallivants, and challenges.  Thank you for reading and writing me.  Special thanks to you all who sent USPS cards !  I wish everyone a happy and prosperous 2017.   Here’s what Spock would say and where he got it.

Here was my “last hours” post from 2015.  And here from the year before with some vessels sailing away forever.   And here showing what I painted in the last hours of 2013.  And one more with origins “oud jaardag” stuff from the finale of 2011.

Fire off the free foton fireworks!

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For 3286 times before today I’ve posted since

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November 26, 2006.  My very first post was here.  In the big scheme of things, 10 years is a short time, yet I have seen a fair amount of change in my beat–the sixth boro–in that time, particularly shore features, bridges, and some of the actual vessels afloat.  I certainly have learned a lot since 2006.

It does take some time every day, and I’ve thought to discontinue many times . . .

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but I continue.  Thank you all for reading, commenting, correcting my errors and typos, answering my questions, suggesting ideas, sending along photos, offering me jobs, giving me work, inviting me to stuff, indulging my made-up words, recognized me, alerting me of events to shoot, unlocking doors, sending me gifts, buying me elixirs, sharing company, entrusting me with secrets, keeping me off the partisan shoals on FB, and generally being friendly.  You all have kept me going, have convinced me all this needs to be documented, and therefore, I’ve put at least 25,000 photos into the public domain.

Digital cameras make this documentation easy and the internet lowers the cost.  So I hope you continue to read the blog, respond, send along photos, and more.  If the photo enlarges well and it fits, I’ll use it, crediting you by name or pseudonym.  (Cell phone photos do not often work, unfortunately.)  The boro is complex, perspectives infinite, and the “gallivants beyond”  just plain innumerable.

Will I keep it up for another 10 years?  Who knows whether anyone will be alive next year . . . although I hope we’ll be.

Again, I am humbled and thank you.

Here was post 1000.

Here are anniversary posts from select previous years:  2008     2010    2011   2012   2014   2015

 

Recognize the red schooner?  It’s shown here approaching the dock in Cape Town last week in a photo by Colin Syndercombe, whose previous photos you can see here.  Here are previous photos of the red boat on tugster, and here is the blog kept by the crew of the red boat, Issuma.  Since leaving the sixth boro in Fall 2010, Issuma has traveled up the St. Lawrence, northward leaving Canada to port and Greenland to starboard, across the Northwest Passage, southward through the Bering Strait . . . you get the flow.

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It’s Richard Hudson.  So if you didn’t click on his blog link above, after traveling southward west of the entire North and South American continents–with a stopover in Easter Island–he rounded Cape Horn, leaving it to port, and kissed Antarctica.  Some time later this week, Issuma will leave Cape Town and head for New Zealand.

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In October 2010, Issuma tied up briefly along the East River in Queens.  Oh the stories he can tell!

Also, much gratitude to Colin for taking these pics.

Note:  This morning I noticed that wordpress has automatically added a captioning space below each photo, so I’ve decided to use it.  What unifies this set of photos is the fact that it shows three of the most powerful NYC-based tugs that primarily assist powered vessels into and out of the port.

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Laura K. Moran

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Eric McAllister

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Robert E. McAllister

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Laura K.

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Eric

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Robert E. and a patched up Amy C McAllister

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Laura K.

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Eric

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Robert E.

I think the last time I used a photo of Amy C McAllister was here, actually not that long ago.  Here’s a comparison of the three boats featured here by horsepower.

Eric McAllister–5150, Laura K–5100, and Robert E–4000.  I suspect the sixth boro will be seeing a new Moran vessel with 6000 horsepower by mid-summer.

Let me know what you think of the use of captions.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

or cousin or just compatriot . . . .   which would place this in what waterway?

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Waver Three is not my spelling, but  . . . someone else’s, for which I’ll add the link soon.

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But here’s the story.  The vessel in the photos above were sent to me recently by Niek  , a native of the Netherlands who followed the trail of love south to Argentina, where this vessel was recently refloated.  To see what Granadero (ex-Meta Ipland) looked like before being raised AND before sinking, click on this link and plod through the Spanish and German.  As a Dutchman living in Argentina, it’s easy to understand how Niek is interested in this century-old vessel built in his homeland.

Click on this link and then do a “find” for the term  ” salvemos al granadero”   and you’ll read an interview in which a Ruben Roderiguez is not happy that Waver three (sic) made it out of Rio de la Plata.

Some folks in Argentina are very proud of their maritime heritage, as evidence by this database of tall ships (A to L)  and  (M  to Z  ) that once operated there, including Granadero and Wavertree.

Good to know for us, the custodians of Wavertree.

Niek . ..  thanks for the photos and story.

 

I know some folks refuse to spend time with Facebook.  I entered there in 2008 after figuring out it was the only way to communicate and exchange photos with some people.  Now I’ve joined 14 groups there . .  and checking in has become similar to dropping by the breakroom at a job.

Saturday night I saw this photo.  Actually it’s only a detail of a bigger photo.   Any ideas what it is?

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Here’s the entire shot, an assemblage of mostly tugboats attached to a circular base where a crane is mounted.  Two landing craft travel from left to right and what looks like a few miles distant there’s a beach with mountains not far behind.

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The photo was put up on Saturday afternoon.   Notice the initial comment by Kees (pronounced “case” ) van der Ende.  Of course, I needed to respond as I did.  What amazed me was the thread that followed in less than an hour!

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Less than 24 hours later, the tugs as well as the project had been identified through a textbook case of “group sourcing.” I love it.  Click here for more on Aegean Pelagos.  Click here for some Zouros tugs.   Click here for Arctic Kalvik, although I wonder why such an icebreaker would be in the Med.

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Once Kees had expressed interest in being the CEO, another 20+ posts followed on the topic of logos and such.

Click here for a photo of the completed bridge as well as points along the way to completion.

By the way . .  .  pay a moment or two tribute to Mardi Gras today, even if NYC and the sixth boro is as cold as  . . .  .   You decide how to finish it in some original way . . . not borrowed from J. D. Salinger.    Here was my first mardi gras post from five years ago!

You know the colors and organization, but can you name the vessel?  And as to the organization, do you know all the foreign countries where they operate?  I didn’t. 

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Anyhow, all these fotos come from Oregon compliments of Michael Bogoger of Doryman fame.  Actual photographer is Jamie Orr of Bristol Channel cutter Baggywrinkle, returning from sea.

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The vessel is USACE dredge Yaquina, here at the entrance to its namesake river.

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Michael’s searched tirelessly for this dredge ever since last October, when I posted these fotos of McFarland.  That post also generated this impressive list of USACE vessels from the esteemed Harold Tartell . . . a veritable encyclopedia of USACE newbuilds from 1855 until 2012 . . . including the 1981 Yaquina.

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Previously, the latest dredge in a distant location I’ve been looking at was Xin Hai Liu, in Rio.

For these fotos, many thanks to Michael and Jamie.

Captain Charles . .  1953.  Know the location?  The bridge in the background is a clue.  Answer can be found at the end of this post.

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James Turecamo, like me class of 1969, foto taken just before yesterday’s planned building implosion.  By that early hour, James had already earned a fair amount of “keep.”  To see James in Turecamo livery, click here.

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Hunter is something different!  She’s just towed in a dead fishing boat.  How much would a RIB like this cost new?

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Catherine and Kimberly, both Turecamo, escorted Tonna up the Arthur Kill, past the scrapyard where Gary Kane and I filmed the documentary.

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Jennie B, 1955, in the mighty Columbia.

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Captain Bob, August 1945 Marietta Manufacturing Point Pleasant WV hull #538, is a one year younger sibling LT of Bloxom (June 1944 and hull # 519)!  Also, in this run was Mary E. Hannah and James A. Hannah, posted here on tugster in 2012.   To get a sense what Captain Bob (ex-Sea Commander) looks like high and dry–and by extension what Bloxom of Graves of Arthur Kill once did–click here.  On the vessel below, I love the green “door.”

Scroll through here and here for more LT Army fotos.

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HMS Liberty 1978 here sidles up to schooner Virginia.

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Linda L. Miller, eastbound of the East River.   Linda L. and Gabby Miller assisted in loading Mighty Servant a year and a half ago.

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Coastline Bay Star, once known as Coney Island, dates from 1958.

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Longsplice (originally Shrike, 1959) recently high and dry near the Arthur Kill.

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Pilot, 1941 out of a yard in Sturgeon Bay WI, is a sibling of Spooky!

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And this vessel, on the left bank of the Willamette, I’ve no idea.  Anyone help?

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Getting back to that first foto, the bridge in the background is the Bronx-Whitestone.  Foto then is taken from the north end of that unique part of the Bronx called City Island.

All fotos taken in the past month by Will Van Dorp.

Very related:  I’m looking for someone (or some group of people)  to take over guest editor position of this blog for about a month this summer.  Compensation is a fortune of sixth boro shellbacks as well as fame;  you could become a paladin of the port.  You really can be geographically any watery place.  And you have to adhere to a disciplined foto-driven/sparse verbiage mix of workboats, history, eccentricity, and apolitical wit.  Of course, you can add to that a smattering of your own favorite sprinklings.

Hmmm . . . does that describe tugster?  Feel free to add to a characterization of the blog.  But seriously, I need to step away for a while this summer . . . to gallivant, of course.   Get in touch for details.   Learning the blogging template is not difficult.

According to the calculations on my rusty cruncher . . .

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this number has passed in the wee and dark and windy hours of Boxing Day.

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A million . . .  graphic ways of representing this would be . . . it would take 158 trips of Queen Sapphire, currently in the sixth boro, to deliver that many BMWs.  Or the hold of a half-filled Bebedouro would contain enough Brazilian pulp for that much orange juice.

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Wikipedia offers some other ways to represent a million.

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Meanwhile, this is my next goal.

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Here’s the proof.

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I’m humbled and grateful.  Thanks for reading, sharing, and commenting.  And thanks for the emails and private messages.  The green coming out of the rusty cruncher above is getting to know so many of you.  Thanks and more thanks.  I never dreamed this was possible when I started the blog just after Thanksgiving 2006.

Meanwhile, I’ll be in the wooded upland between the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico til after New Years’ begin.

Peace!

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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