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If you follow this blog, you know I look for novelty:  new vessels, new roles, new perspectives I don’t always even initially or ever understand.  Here’s for me a new boat, Cape Fear, 2018, another Sassafras class tug.

 

Brendan Turecamo, 1975,  has appeared here many times, but in the past week, I’ve seen her in two configurations, doing ship assist below and

slinging barge Connecticut below.  Yes, it’s the same tug, house down or house up.

With the bronze monument, aka Teardrop Memorial, in the background, Marjorie B. McAllister delivers nearly a dozen rail cars on NYNJ100

to cross over the harbor from NJ to NY. The run is usually performed by Brown tugs.

Chemical Pioneer, a sixth boro icon, here is assisted into the anchorage by  . . . Franklin Reinauer.

Matthew Tibbetts stands by as Dylan Cooper (correct me if I’m wrong) with RTC 108 lighters Gulf Coral. 

Taking a break from the dredge project over by Sandy Hook, Neptune travels west in the KVK.

Sea Lion pushes a barge westbound on the East River, past the old banana pier and Vladick Houses of the Lower East Side in the background.

Ivory Coast stands by with an Express Marine (former owner?) barge over in the Wallabout section of the East River. 

Christian Reinauer and barge RTC 145 stand by over in the anchorage below Fort Wadsworth.

And finally . . .  over in Red Hook, Eastern Dawn hangs alongside Meaghan Marie. Stand by for a new paint job of Eastern Dawn.

All photos, any errors, solely mine, WVD.

I took this photo in Waterford eastern terminus of the Erie Canal on November 1, 2010, and the canal had not yet closed.  I had just returned from part of a transit, and we had met lots of boats.  Although we had been bound for the Great Lakes, most, like the intriguing Baidarka, was bound for sea.  As of this writing, Baidarka is back on the Canadian Pacific coast.

A week later, in the sixth boro, docked in front of USNS Sisler, it’s the “love it or hate it” Sea Raven, now turned into new steel.

Sea Bear was engaged in the deepening of the sixth boro, and here a crew on the sheerleg was repositioning the anchor.

Lots of dredges including GLDD New York were involved.  More later.  Captain D, currently in the sixth boro on other duties, was dredge tender.

Then, as now Atlantic Salvor, was active.   I particularly like this shot with the 0730 “golden hour” light.  A very different set of buildings then largely defined the Manhattan skyline.

Wanderbird swooped through the harbor on their way south.

Padre Island and Terrapin Island were regulars recontouring the sixth boro bed.

Beaufort Sea, 1971, is no more. 

The brilliant colored Little Bear, built 1952, became a DonJon vessel, but I’ve not seen her since the Disch auction.

Susan Witte . . . I can’t tell you anything about her either.

Back then I would spend my Thanksgivings in Philly, and the high point of that holiday was not the excellent food and drink and company, but rather seeing the big barge for the first time.

Pilot towed in La Princesa, here assisted up the Delaware by Grace and Valentine Moran.   Pilot has been sold Panamanian, and La Princesa–577′ x 105′–I’ve neither seen nor heard from.  I believe Valentine is still active, but I don’t know about Grace.

All photos, WVD, who looks at these and wonders how a decade has so quickly passed.

 

Like lots of things, the Great North River Tugboat Race is, as ws said in a comment yesterday, “alas  . . .  cancelled this year.”  So here’s some consolation, ws. . .  If you need a dose of racing, you can click here and get all the way back to tugster post 2006, or for a sampling from 2006 until 2011, follow along.  In 2006, I followed from W. O. Decker and had this view.  I’ll let you try to identify these;  if the group-source gets stuck, I’ll help out.

In 2007 . . .   of these, only Lucy Reinauer is still around here.

HMS Liberty is still around.

In 2008 . . .  throttling up releases some smoke . . .

 

In 2009, two of these are still running around the sixth boro staying busy.  The third was involved in a scandalous grouding and has been scrapped.

Meagan Ann has unique safety headgear, inspired by an ancient design.

In 2010 . . .  this was a motley armada, ranging from Atlantic Salvor to The Bronx.

Catherine C. Miller and Mary H were hurrying to the starting line here.

That year saw lots of pushing match-ups.

Vulcan III could be matched up with Viking later.

In 2011, THIS could be called the heat . . .  actually, it was a misting from one of the fire boats.

Pushing around happened all over the field for spectators on deck and photographers up high.

As always, getting a line on a bollard . . . just another event in the sixth boro games.

USMMA’s Growler is closing on the bollard as a crewman demonstrates a rodeo-influenced style.

More to come . . . all photos, WVD.  And if the last four photos above suggest a muddy Hudson, remember that 2011 had just seen Hurricane Irene flood the valley creeks feeding into the Hudson.

 

 

But first, can you guess the date?  Answer follows.

Mackenzie Rose is the newest name for this 2000-built boat, after Vernon C and then Mary Gellatly.

Ellen, ex-YTB-793 Piqua, here assists a box boat with a boat on top.   Ex-YTBs can be found in some unusual places.

Capt. Brian A. approaches the pilot’s door of this ULCV.

Jay Michael is painted a flat red, or maybe that’s a faded bright red.

Mount St Elias heads east with a loaded DBL 82.

Robert IV is off to a job.

Anacostia goes out the Ambrose with Double Skin 509A on wire.

Sea Lion returns, as does

Lincoln Sea and DBL 140 arrive from the south.

And finally, James D and Miriam meet a box ship to escort her into port.

Did you guess the date of the McAllister Bros. photo?  It comes thanks to Steve Munoz, who sent more along as well.  The answer is 1973, and the photo is taken from the Hoboken side.

All photos, except Steve’s, by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated but interesting:  How one small town grocery store in Alaska keeps the shelves stocked here.   More southern Alaska boat infrastructure here.

How’s this as an unusual perspective, East Coast coming through the Narrows and under the VZ Bridge, barely visible at top of photo,  with a sugar barge, not sure which one. I believe that’s a Sandy Hook antenna and West Bank Romer Shoal Light off starboard.

Kimberly Poling heads into the Kills past Robbins Reef Light.

James William has been moving garbage containers these days.

The intriguingly named Iron Wolf passes the Brooklyn Army Terminal.

Mary Alice moves Columbia New York.

A few hundred yards ahead of Iron Wolf is Sea Fox.

Andrea departs the Kills to pick up a fuel barge.

Mary H returns from a run with barge Patriot.

And finally, Fox3 heads southbound;  that’s the southern tip of Manhattan behind her.

All photos, WVD.

Today it’s all light, technically.  Other than that, this set is all sizes, all ages, all powers, and all shapes.

Let’s start with  Gabby L., built in 2007 (?), 25.9′ x 13.7′, and rated as 660 hp.

Comparing that, check out Genesis Vigilant, which I first met as Michigan Service, (same order of numbers) 1981, 89′ x 28′, and 3000 hp.

Emily Ann, ex-Solomon Sea, ex-Brandon Roehrig and ex-Diane Roehrig, 1964, 89′ x 28′, and also 3000 hp.

Sea Fox, 2012, 69′ x 24′, and 1400 hp.

Joyce D. Brown, 2002, 78′ x 26′, and 2600 hp.

Fleetmate Thomas J. Brown, 1962, 61′ x 19′, and 1000 hp.

As I said before, technically light but about to engage the Seaspan ship, Jonathan C, 2016, 89′ x 38′, and 6000 hp.

And since we started out with Gabby L, let’s end there also, but you may have to look carefully to the left of the VZ bridge towers . . . . to spot her.  As I said before . . . all shapes and sizes, but they all work a niche in the sixth boro.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

What to post for the first morning after the solstice?

How about a Fox,

a Sea Fox out there every day.  The other day I followed them under the B-M-W bridges over the East River.  Actually, that would be W-M-B bridges in this case . . . Williamsburg Bridge above, Manhattan Bridge below, and

 

then the Brooklyn Bridge. In case you’re wondering, that’s a recycling barge.  For more on NYC trash handling, click here and find some interesting numbers.

Previous Sea Fox posts can be found here. The 1400 hp tug is bearing its seventh or so name.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s been out this morning getting “first winter 2019” photos.

Happy solstice.

All photos in this post come from Paul Strubeck, who has started a blog here called vintagedieseldesign.

Mary H is the right size to serve the fuel storage in Newtown Creek, a renowned location in the sixth boro. Here are previous posts I’ve done there.

The first oil refinery in the US was sited here, and that industry fouled it, given attitudes at that time toward the environment and disposal of chemical waste.

Today a lot of commerce happens there from oil storage to scrap metal processing.

 

 

 

 

The creek has its advocates, these folks and others. At its headwaters lies Bushwick, not for everyone but vibrant in its own way.  Here’s a post I did last fall after a tour on land and on the water of Bushwick.

Again, thanks to Paul for these photos.

 

Memorial Day weekend 2019 . . .  and we should all remember the meaning, whether we’re working or vacating from work.

You can read the names on the vessels or on the tags.

 

 

 

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’d included no links in this post except the one that follows and which I hope you read in its entirety here.

Seeing a tugboat on a mooring in the sixth boro is unusual, in my experience, and I took many shots.  This is my favorite.

Neptune the other morning headed for sea along the sylvan banks of Staten Island.

James E. Brown moves a scow, likely to be filled with scrap metals.

Brian Nicholas travels to a job  . . . that’s New Jersey off her starboard.

JRT Moran crosses the Upper Bay enroute to an assist.

Genesis Eagle travels along Brooklyn’s Owl’s Head.

One almost has the illusion here that Emily Ann is on assist with that tanker.  Almost.

Mister Jim lighters salt

from SBI Phoebe.

Sea Lion heads out of her base to grab  . . . a recycling barge perhaps.

And Atlantic Salvor continues shuttling dredge spoils from somewhere off the bottom of the North River.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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