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Blessings of summer heat, if you don’t have to work out in it, are best relished right after dawn, or from the shade.  I chose the first option here as Barney Turecamo, made up to Georgia,

gets an assist in rotating from Turecamo Girls.

Once pointed, a burst of power from its 5100hp EMDs commits the ATB to its course.

Foxy3, with its bright trim ribbons gleaming in the dawn, is off to the job.

Doubleskin 57 arrives from somewhere in the Kills and Elk River

waits to assist Wye River

 

in placing it alongside the dock gently.

Marjorie B is off to some work, followed by and Poling & Cutler and Vane units.

The P & C unit was Kristin Poling pushing Eva Leigh Cutler.

On another day, Mister T was arriving from outside the Narrows

just as the sun cleared Bay Ridge.

And yet another day and different place, Curtis Reinauer waited alongside RTC 82 during cargo transfer.

 

All photos, WVD.

Seen in and around the sixth boro in the past weeks . . .  is this batch, starting with BBC Germany, heading up the North River.

Kitikmeot W had Dory alongside,

She was previously . . . Icdas 09.

Genava, homeported in the impossible saltwater port of Basel and formerly Tsuneishi Zhoushan Ss 180, discharges Chilean salt.

Maritime Kelly Anne preps for departure.

Parallel to the previous shot lies FPMC 24, with Lesney Byrd providing lubrication oils.   Without looking it up, what do you suppose FPMC expands to?

Sten Odin has to be the newest vessel in today’s set.

 

And finally, in the anchorage near the VZ Bridge, it’s Ladon and Chemneon.

All photos by WVD.

And FPMC . . . is Formosa Plastics Marine Corporation, based here.  I never saw that coming.

On a recent foggy rainy day, I caught Elk River bunkering (I believe) Maritime Kelly Anne.  That’s certainly an interesting name, although yesterday Endless Summer topped it, arriving from Brasil.  Might there be a string of ships with movie name references out on the oceans?

I love how fog narrows the depth of field in a natural way.

The same day Genesis Vigilant nosed into an IMTT dock.

Wye River was traveling light on the way to and likely from a barge,

as were Morgan Reinauer,

 Haggerty Girls, and

and Stephen Reinauer.

Brendan was following a ship to Port Elizabeth.

Stephanie Dann was headed for sea and south.

Ellen S. Bouchard was lying alongside B. No. 262, as her fleet and their crews languish.  And exfiltrate?

Catherine Miller moves a Caddell crane  . . . back to the KVK base.

All photos,WVD.

 

 

 

Count the tugboats in this one shot . . .  six! And a seventh is obscured right behind the nearest.  And no, it was not part of the annual tugboat race.  From (l) to (r), it’s JRT Moran, Amy Moran, Stephen B, (and Ellen McAllister is obscured) then Genesis Eagle, Magothy with Double Skin 57, and Elk River doing assist.

In case you suspect I’m making up the seventh tugboat, here’s a closeup of Ellen assisting Eagle just nine seconds earlier.

A bit later, I noticed a similar density over in the anchorage.  Just naming ships, (l) to (r), there’s Advance II, White Horse, Sten Odin, and Cielo di Londra.

Then among then, there are two more tug/barge units with tugs Barry Silverton and Helen Laraway.  Interesting how Barry Silverton is shrunk when beside a tanker.

And a bit later I zoomed down, around, and in to see the service vessels clustered around White Horse:  HMS* Liberty (I think), a Miller Launch boat, and on the far side Lesney Byrd.

All photos, WVD, who’s now outa town for a while.  Thx to everyone who’s sent in or pledged relief posts.

Also, a certain exotic ship is coming into the harbor, and I’d be very grateful if someone stepped forward to get photos of it as it arrives.  Email me, please, if you might be able to get the shot.

*HMS . . . Harley Marine Services is no more; out of its ashes rises Centerline Logistics.

J. George Betz and Morton Bouchard Jr. raft up on the floating dock.

Helen Laraway pushes toward the east.

JRT passes Weddell Sea on the way home after completion of another job.

Daisy Mae moves a deeply loaded scow westbound.  I’m not certain but believe the product is road salt.

Discovery Coast heads over toward the Kills.

A light Elk River makes for the next job.

Emily Ann tows  astern passing the collection of boxes in the Global Terminal.

And Majorie B. passes Pacific Sky while she steams back to the McAllister yard.

And one more, Ellen S, Pearl Coast, and Evening Light .  .  round out this installment.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose sense of this decade’s end is growing more palpable, offers this photo of Michigan Service and a whole lotta dredgin’ from the last two weeks of 2009.

Here are posts one through five in this series.

 

 

 

 

 

Just a photo essay, Vane tugs and barges in the KVK through all the daylight hours today.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s a different perspective on the sixth boro, different from my more usual ones.  And in this morning light, Sarah Ann looks like a beauty as she heads somewhere past Robbins Reef Light and

well . . . along that island.

Let’s continue trying to get some different POVs.  Patricia has some fine lines here accentuated by the low light of dawn.

Elk River and Hunting Creek pass, with missions in opposite directions.

Evelyn Cutler moves product for somewhere up the North River.

Paula Atwell moves garbage containers past an incoming green new shipment, and

Julie Anne, a new one for me in the sixth boro although I have posted a “down south” photo of her here, moves a scow up toward the Passaic River.  Notice that until I got to the Norfolk tugs, there were no tugs with even a drip of red paint on them in this post?

And finally, Brian Nicholas is neither a huge nor a small tug, 72′ loa, but as she passes the stern of CMA CGM Nabucco, she

looks almost like a toy.  My first reaction was excitement  . ..  erroneously thinking I’d see either the elusive  Susan E. or Elizabeth Anna.  But don’t get me wrong, greetings to Brian Nicholas!

All photos and sentiments here the product of and/or the opinion of Will Van Dorp.

 

 

According to the family history here, they started with schooners and currently, besides oil, they push water and do more.  Monday I caught Susquehanna standing by along the KVK as container vessel Zim Shenzhen hurried for its assignation in Port Elizabeth.

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The following four pics come from Jim Demske, who’s worked for Vane for over twenty years as Captain and is now Port Captain in charge of “New Tug Construction.”   Elk River entered service mid-summer 2009, just a little over six months after Sassafras did.

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Seabart sends along a link to the 23 August issue of Tugs Towing & Offshore Newsletter with a short piece about the Charles Burton launch:  see page 4/12 of this link.  Charles Burton is sibling to Elk River and Sassafras.

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Compare wheelhouse of a Sassafras class with

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that of Vane Brothers largest class–Brandywine.  Click on boatnerd’s site here for pics of Brandywine’s first splash in early 2006 at Marinette Marine in cold  Wisconsin.  These folks also built the Molinari class Staten Island ferries.

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More Brandywine and its mate Double Skin 141 here, loa 480′ and capacity of 145,000 barrels, also built in Wisconsin.

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Jeff Anzevino took the next two fotos, Potomac of the Patapsco class, operating in the icy

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Hudson north of Poughkeepsie.

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Like the lead foto, I took this one.  In this case,  Patapsco thrusts forward and divides Hudson water in the Great North River race in 2007.  Beyond Patapsco are Lucy Reinauer and Nathan E. Stewart.  The two cruise ships mostly visible are Norwegian Spirit and Norwegian Dawn.

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Again, special thanks to Jim and Jeff for use of these pictures.

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