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The Soo is open, the SL Seaway is open, and now after 6 days, 3 hours, and 38 minutes of blockage . . . the Suez is open.

I’d started this post before Ever Given was freed and intend it as a survey of some of the tugs involved, here from largest to smaller. Obviously dimensions do not tell the whole story;  in fact, dimensions tell only the story of length and width, but most of these are not harbor tugs.  The largest is Alp Guard, 243′ x 69′ and generating just over 24000 hp.

Next are two quite similar Suez Canal Authority tugs, Ezzat Adel (226′ x 52′)

and Baraka 1, same dimensions, built in 1993 one year before Ezzat Adel.

Carlo Magno comes in at 180′ x 49′, still larger than anything in the sixth boro.

Now we’re at the scale of sixth boro tugs, although several in the boro are larger.  Basel 2 measures in at 119′ x 38′.

Salam 8 and 9 were there, coming in at 115′ x 36′

Svitzer Port Said 1 and 2 measure 104′ x 43′ and generate 6772, very similar to the largest sixth boro assist tugs.  For example Capt. Brian and Ava M. generate 6770 hp.

Mosaed 3 comes in at 98′ x 36′.

Of course, tugs weren’t the only factor.  Someone like Resolve or Smit Salvage taking charge is needed to orchestrate the efforts, which include dredging as well. If you’ve not seen this interview with salvage master Nick Sloane, it’s an enlightening listen.

Credit for photos is embedded in the photos;  click on each to see it.

Any errors, WVD.

Was this an event just waiting to happen?  See here.

 

Salt 14 dates from November 2017, with previous installments going back to 2009, when bulk carriers could not yet dock at the current location of Atlantic Salt aka “the salt pile”.  As of this time, there’s not much of a pile at the salt pile.

With our mild weather for the early part of this winter, no salt resupply happened until recently.  Strategic Unity brought in a load,

which she discharged using her own buckets. Those are big buckets though.

Then Katerina brought in a load.  Katerina left port last night.  I forget which, but one of these was from Mexico and the other from Egypt . . . imported road safety product.

Meanwhile, Pacific Talent is still here, from India.

She lightered in the anchorage

discharging off both sides

for a few days.

 

before moving to Duraport, where she is currently.

All photos, WVD.

 

This vessel–Mozu Arrow– intrigued me about two months ago, but I never saw it.  I’m grateful to Mike Abegg for these photos then.

I followed it on AIS, thinking maybe it’d lead to some Equatorial places, maybe to load tropical woods…  but instead, after hitting lots of US East Coast ports, it headed to Europe.

G2 Ocean has quite the diverse fleet, including some TEFCs, totally enclosed forestry carriers.

So when I noticed they were back in Red Hook–from Europe!!– I decided to take a boat ride.

Notice the two side hatches on the port side.

And, inside that RORO-like space, cranes operate, here discharging 10 bundles at once.  In high school I had a job offloading lumber, board by board, standing on the truck handing one board down to my boss–on a kiln rail car, as a furniture factory rep put down spacers so that air could get between the planks.  He also measured or scaled each plank, making notations on his clipboard to determine how much my boss got paid and to create an inventory of how much wood they’d put in the drying kiln.

Here, that’s all been done, so the pace is faster. 

But I still wondered where all this wood was coming from.  In the past, wood might come from the tropics but in the form of logs, forest giants, their buttressed roots cut off,  that might have fit only one log to a trailer.

So here’s the clue, and you can be sure I looked it up, especially when there’s an “over the top” slogan . . . perfection in timber.  Where might this be coming from?

It turns out this is European wood from forests and mills in central and eastern Europe, especially Romania.  I have to be honest . . . I’m not thrilled.  I know they likely buy our stuff, but don’t we have forests and mills in the US?  I’m guessing it’s planed timber, but there may be other products here.

All photos and sentiments, WVD.

As of yesterday evening, Mozu Arrow departed Red Hook for Baltimore.

 

Clifford Maersk is making her final approach into port of NYNJ, arriving here from King Abdul Aziz Seaport in Damman, KSA.   So what?  Check out the non-containerized cargo near the front center of the load.

See it?

As the container ship approached, I managed to get some closer up photos.    I have my theory, but I’ll leave it to you to state yours in the comments

 

Do you see the “squiggle” on the camouflage just right of the red panel, above the rightmost blue container marked “45”?  I call that shape “ithnayn,” Arabic for the number two.

Again, I’m not putting into words what I see here, but I will say it’s poorly wrapped, or formerly wrapped.

This isn’t the first time I’ve seen intriguing cargoes.  Remember these Oshkosh trucks with Hebrew writing on them?  And then there have been other military hardware . . .  military trucks and other vehicles atop the boxes previously here, here, here, and here.   Once I even spotted a cigarette boat way up there.

All photos, WVD.  After your guesses, I’ll show my hand.   And since I’m not trick or treating or dancing tonight, here’s your second post for today.

I had planned something else for today, but then I noticed Sheila, and I caught such an intriguing detail that I decided to postpone the other post.  An update shows her as departing Ambrose Anchorage and heading to Coeymans.  As of posting, she’s passing the Palisades.   Sheila is a fairly new (2016) bulk carrier.

But my question . . . where in the world is the port abbreviated as IQ UQR? I thought it quite an unusual provenance for a vessel transiting the sixth boro.   If Sheila were in IQ UQR this morning, chances are she would see a shallow draft called Damen Hardinxveld.  A shallow draft tug like this no doubt works with lots of trailing suction hopper dredgers, and there are a lot of dredgers in IQ UQR removing the shifting sand.  Any guesses yet?  It may be hard because the Dutch are everywhere.  Click on the photo below and you’ll see where she is today.  Once you find her, follow the waterway inland and you’ll find the answer to the title questions.

The Sheila crew might also see Al-Sandibad.  In fact, she might even have had Al-Sandibad as an assist tug to get away from the dock.

Another tug in the mystery port is Al-Ashaar.  This might get you in the right part of the workd, given the geographical background and the courtesy flag flying from the mast of the tug.  Look closely at the lower name on Al-Sandibad also.   As for diminsions, Al-Sandibad (think “sinbad“) is 120.7′ x 36′.  Al-Ashaar (probably has this guy as namesake)  is 111.5′ x 32.8′.

So the answer is IQ UQR is the universal abbreviation for the port of Umm Qasr.  Got it?  It has a history going back to Alexander the Great in 325 BCE!!  There was also a battle there less than 20 years ago that caused the deaths of 14 coalition soldiers.  Coalition (HMS Bangor, Sandown, and Brocklesby) swept the area of mines.

To see the location and much more of the history of IQ UQR aka Umm Qasr, click here.

I was several miles from Umm Qasr in 1990.  At least one of tugster readers was in the vicinity more recently.  The port has been re-opened for only about a year.

If you want a virtual tour of the area including Khor Al-Zubair port, where I was, and Umm Qasr, you can play with this interactive map.

Sorry, folks.  I hit the “post” rather than the “save” button once again.  Well, enjoy the photos.  I’m going to take some time off.

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All photos, WVD, who has thousands more.

Port Shanghai just happens these days to be in a berth on Staten Island

discharging salt from Chile.

I know what this says, but I can’t claim to read it until I study Greek.

Thor Integrity I CAN read, but

until I know Thai, I can’t vouch for “Thor Integrity” being a translation.

Chinese is a common language in the sixth boro,

 

and it’s interesting which writing systems do not appear here . . .  too many to name.

All photos, WVD.

Here was last year’s post by this title.

My 2020 calendars are ready and can be mailed out as early as this Monday.  To order, send me your USPS mailing address by email (parrotlect at gmail dot com    , you know what I mean) and pay by paypal to that email address, or check made out to Will Van Dorp.  Calendars are $15 each.

When I started the calendar idea,  I’d not considered needing a cover photo, so it was proposed that I chose the Sea Scouts and Sea Dart II, thinking that organization would be one to mention as a possible group to support.  This is a break-even enterprise for me, but if you want to pay more, make a donation to the local Sea Scouts, whose Ship 228 I chose for the cover.  Contact them here.

Here are some photos from the Sea Scout group doing chart training and

hand saluting.

So the calendar . . . here are some ..

sample pages.

Your votes guided my choices.  In one case, I had to switch an image (the April shot of a container ship under the VZ Bridge) to make the photo fit.  In a few cases, no proposed image had a majority, so I included more than one image.

In a few cases, I added some related images.  I hope you will be happy with the result.

As to the actual calendar-making process, it was eye-opening.  I chose VistaPrint (Waltham MA) because I was happy with work/price from them in the past.  Vistaprint is owned by Cimpress, an Irish company that was founded in France.  When I completed the assembly process and sent the credit card number, I got a receipt saying it was sold by Vistaprint in Venlo, Netherlands.  When the box of calendars arrived, the shipping label stated “Printed in Canada” but was shipped from Reno NV.  Mind boggling! This is the global supply chain involved in creating a calendar for a guy in NYC who is handling “order-fulfillment” himself to cut out [the additional] the intermediaries.

It reminds me of a William Langewiesche article I read years ago, which starts out with him telling of flying an air cargo jet over the Himalayas carrying air pallets of Chicago telephone books, back when there were still paper telephone books.  It also reminds me of learning that my MMD-related urine sample was jet FedEx’d to a federally-approved facility in the Midwest;  now I can’t look at a FedEx jet flying overhead and wondering what manner of biosamples it may be transporting.

I printed only 50, so get your calendar ASAP.  My plan for Monday is to carrying a bunch down to the post office.  To repeat, if you want one, email me your address.  Paypal to my email address is an option;  if you want to send a check, email me and I’ll get you my mailing address.  Pieces-of-eight are fine; cryptocurrency is not, nor are sand dollars.

Enjoy one of the shortest days of the year, and the first winter sunrise in the sixth boro is not until 0715 on December 22.

 

. . . Lama Don A . . . ?  well, of course it’s La Madonna, but when I heard the on the VHF, my first thought was what I put as title.

She’s part of the LA International fleet and following in the wake of Sarah Dann, delivering more modules for the Shell ethane cracker in Potter township Pennsylvania by way of the GOM, Mississippi, and a long way up the Ohio.  The Shell plant employs 5000 people and will cost an estimated $6 billion to construct.  More on ethane here.

As of this posting, Sarah Dann, towing another module,  is mid-Gulf of Mexico.

La Madonna is a 6000 hp tug, 112′ x 32′.

 

This module was assembled in Brewer, Maine. 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Uh . . .

Other than that the name of the vessel below seems entirely Thai, I don’t know what to say.

Want a list of Stolt tankers?  Click here. Sypress, I believe, is the Norwegian name for the conifer tree spelled differently in English.  For all the ones already posted in tugster, click here.

Battersea Park . . .  is a park south of the Thames.

Low light photos are only sometimes interesting . . .

At first one might think Glovis is the vessel name, but upon closer study,

clearly it’s not and the company is likely Korean, given the text.  Previous Glovis vessels can be found here.

Cariboo is a 2012 scrap-loaded bulk carrier currently most of the way to Egypt;  where it goes from there I don’t know, but  scrapped beams, cars, trucks, and boats end up in the hold of vessels like Cariboo.

And finally, we return to that first vessel, the nameless one.  My suspicion is that it may be between owners.  The IMO number, however, stays with the vessel like a VIN, and the IMO number says that the name might be/have been Energy Trophy, a crude tanker.

All photos and any errors by Will Van Dorp.

Maybe someone can explain this . . .   late last week, six ROROs, of which one was Glovis Comet arrived in the port.   Six!  Is this odd?  Am I missing something?

 

 

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