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All All but one of the photos in this post come from David Silver, assigned as a cadet this summer on a Maersk vessel going halfway around the world and back.  He departed Port Elizabeth on May 21.  This post follows his voyage, focusing on what someone like me–mostly fixed–doesn’t see.

May 24.  Charleston.  Mark Moran.

May 30. Houston.   Thor.

 

May 31.  Houston.  Wesley A.

June 06.  Norfolk.   Maxwell Paul Moran.

June 08.  Pilot boards in sixth boro of NYC.  JRT Moran.

June 08.  VZ Bridge as seen from the ship and

as seen from my location, at about the same moment.

June 09.  Port  Elizabeth.   Kirby Moran. 

There was a stop in Algeciras–the world’s 10th largest transshipment port– but no photos of assist tugboats.

June 25.  Suez Canal.  It could be one of the Mosaed boats, maybe number 1.

June 26.  Suez Canal.  One of the boats called Salam.

After transiting the Red Sea and stopping in Djibouti, July 9.  Mont Arrey, 

they rounded the peninsula and entered the Gulf.

July 9.  Jebel Ali.  P&O Venture.  That could be P&O Energy off the stern.

 

July 12.  Port Qasim.  SL Hodeida  with pilot boat and other Smit Lamnalco tugs.

July 13.  Port Pipavav.  It appears to be Ocean Supreme and another one of the Ocean Sparkle boats in the distance.

 

I have enjoyed seeing this variety of towing vessels from this trip halfway around the world.  Now I hope the return trip brings more photos and a safe return in late August.

Many thanks, David.

Growing up in a beautiful rural place, I never imagined some day living in the largest megalopolis on the US.  But here we are; I live in a concentration with over 50 million others.  That many people and consumers together has implications.  Click on the map to see source.

Here’s how a plethora of goods comes in . . . .

Ten years ago, single vessels this large never transited the sixth boro…

Just yesterday, no fewer than three of these ULCS found themselves in port, and they’ll soon push today’s limits.

So I have my own word for them:  megaboxforus.  Megaboxforuses . . . could be the plural.

 

 

 

And they change hands . . . Edison not long ago was Maersk Edison.  Maersk possibly traded in a 1200′ for a 1300′.

See the paint outs?

 

This morning Cosco Shipping Peony–the first of its class–arrived just before adequate light for photos.  I hope some one gets photos during its first sixth boro stay.

And once the boxes leave the ULCS, they go into the hinterland on steel rails or–less efficiently–on a single chassis pulled by a tractor.

These statistics are quickly becoming obsolete.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Thanks to Tony A, whose previous contributions can be found here, here’s an insider’s view of a scrap ferrous metal run, starting with a view across the deep “hold” of the scow as it exits the Buttermilk heading for whichever of the sixth boro’s creeks has the product.

Once loaded, the scow is brought ship side.

Note the multiple load marks . . .

As the crane transfers the scrap into the hold of the ship, the tug may move to a safe distance or do another run.  By tomorrow, bulker Nichirin will be arriving in Iskenderun, Turkey, 15 miles from the Syrian border and less than 30 from Aleppo.

Photos I’ve taken over the years of scrap metals runs include these of Crow, in blue and

in red.

And here I think it’s Sarah Ann doing a really efficient run.

Thanks to Tony for the top four photos.  The bottom three are by Will Van Dorp.

And come to think of it, I wonder if the late great Crow has ended up in Iskenderun also….

 

Here’s another set of recent photos, all taken by Jan Oosterboer, and all showing traffic quite different from what you’d see on our side of the A-Ocean.

Start with these four tugs, three by Fairmount.  In the lead, it’s Fairmount Expedition, rated at 16320 bhp, and 205 ton bollard pull.   She’s Japan-built 2007.

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Second in that line, FairPlay 33, 8160 bhp,  is Romania-built 2011, likely constructed in the yard where Allie B towed the old Quincy Goliath crane.

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Check the Fairmount link above for the particulars on Alpine and

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Sherpa.

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Union Sovereign, 2003 and China built and rated at 16500 bhp.

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Going from chartreuse to primer red . . . .this is a multicat shallow draft vessel built in Gdansk to be completed in greater Rotterdam.  Click here and here to see how this vessel gets launched.

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The unfinished multicat is towed here by Egesund, a tug that could most easily fit in in the sixth boro.   The offset house allows more deck equipment to be fitted.

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And finally . . . above and below, it’s Norman Flipper, 2003 and Norway built.

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These photos by Jan Oosterboer come via Fred Trooster, to whom both I am grateful.

Technically, I’ve never finished my posts on watersheds 12 and 13 . . .  the troves of photos from those places have simply been preserved by photos that followed and those stories remain to be finished . . . like most things in life.

The photos here, all from Maraki . . .  , offer a focus other than how much ice chills the sixth boro, an interesting enough topic but one that I need to get away from periodically.  Come inside, sip some chocolate, and contemplate the equatorial zones.  Like Rio Magdalena.

I’d seen the Magdalena on maps . . .

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but never imagined what floated there. . . until then photo below led to Impala, an entity I’d never heard of before.

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And that summoned info on where the tugs there come from, a question easily answered  . . . thanks to this internet thing.  Behold Impala  Zambrano and Impala Puerto Wilches.

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Traffic like this coexists with the global economy.

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East of the mouth of the Magdalena a dozen and some miles lies Santa Marta, where Atlantico awaits . . .

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as does Chinook and

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and RM Boreas.

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Atlantico and Chinook are built in China.  I’m not sure about RM Boreas.

Two more from these waters from now . . .. Intergod VII.  Any guesses on place of construction?

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I’m not sure where the Bauprespilotos get their boats like Voyager, but Intergod VII

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was built in Collingwood, Ontario in 1967.

Many thanks to Maraki for creating the desire to explore yet another watershed.  For the latest dispatches from Maraki–above and below the water and during Curaçao’s carnival . . . click here.

 

It’s late Sunday evening, and Monday morning will come very early, so as a sneak preview to tomorrow’s post, a few photos of the transit of Zhen Hua 10 to Port Newark.  Moveable platform courtesy of NYMedia Boat, which gets a photographer in the right places.

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More tomorrow after work.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

As day broke, the fog descended.  Here was Zhen Hua 10 right outside the Narrows around 0700.

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Marie J. Turecamo stood by.

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Nicholas Miller ferried out . . . crew?   . . . materials?

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Here’s how the bridge looked by 0720.  i had to do some work, and when I

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returned at 1030 . . . the bridge looked like this and Zhen Hua 10 and  escorts looked like

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this.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.   Here’s the Shanghai-based company site.

What’s this?  Answer follows.

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Ice . .  we love it in some drinks.  but on rivers and roads, it’s a nuisance.  Ice breakers try to keep strategic waterways open, and on roadways, salt is the weapon, but when the storehouse floor looks like this and

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and this, then you pray for another replenishment.   By the way, the top photo looks down into this hold from the exterior.

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Geography and time are  impediments, but so are well-intentioned regulations, as explained in this article.  We’re still a month from the start of spring this year, and according to the article embedded in the previous sentence, the state of NJ–I don’t know the info for NYC or NY–has used 1.5 times the amount of salt used all last winter.

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Many thanks to Brian DeForest of Atlantic Salt for all the photos in this post.

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These photos were taken on M/V Rhine last week.

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Currently the next vessel has arrived and  . . . more are in the offing.

Many thanks to Brian for these photos.

It’s high time for me to reread Kurlansky’s Salt.

The link here may show the first glimpse I had of Balder.  Let me share my getting better acquainted, but first . . . the foto below I took 13 months ago.  Note the different colors of salt, reflecting

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different provenances, as explained in Ian Frazier’s New Yorker article below.  Buy a copy to get the rest of the story.

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Without this vessel, all of us who drive the roads or walks the sidewalks and streets within the metropolis surrounding the sixth boro would be at greater risk of slipping and crashing.  Framed that way, Balder could not be better named.   Here’s what Kimberly Turecamo looks like from Balder‘s bridge.

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On the far side of the channel, that’s Dace.

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Here’s what has come forth from Balder‘s belly, a bit of the Atacama Desert on the KVK.   Huge tractors load the trucks that come to a highway department near you today.

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This 246′ arm, reaching nearly to Richmond Terrace, offloads at the relatively slow rate of 8oo tons per hour.

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And here’s the hold just emptied, one hold of five.  Notice the ladders and the tracks at the base of the hold.

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Click here to see the unloading machinery in action.

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Navel, perhaps?

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Here’s what gets even the last pound making up the nearly 50,000-ton payload onto the salt dock.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Thanks to Brian DeForest of Atlantic Salt and the Balder crew for the tour.

I love snowy mornings . . . like this one 48 hours ago.

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As of this writing, APL Pearl--Oakland registered–has just docked in Savannah.    I also adore surprises:  it turns out I took fotos of APL Pearl docking in Howland Hook four and a half years ago, when the vessel was known as Hyundai Voyager.

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Resolute follows–well, resolutely–waiting to retrieve the docking pilot.

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And what’s on the boxpile?

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As I said, I love snowstorms.  That’s when the most interesting fotos seem daring someone to snap them.

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All fotos snapped by Will Van Dorp.

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