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Sorry, folks.  I hit the “post” rather than the “save” button once again.  Well, enjoy the photos.  I’m going to take some time off.

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All photos, WVD, who has thousands more.

Port Shanghai just happens these days to be in a berth on Staten Island

discharging salt from Chile.

I know what this says, but I can’t claim to read it until I study Greek.

Thor Integrity I CAN read, but

until I know Thai, I can’t vouch for “Thor Integrity” being a translation.

Chinese is a common language in the sixth boro,

 

and it’s interesting which writing systems do not appear here . . .  too many to name.

All photos, WVD.

Here was last year’s post by this title.

My 2020 calendars are ready and can be mailed out as early as this Monday.  To order, send me your USPS mailing address by email (parrotlect at gmail dot com    , you know what I mean) and pay by paypal to that email address, or check made out to Will Van Dorp.  Calendars are $15 each.

When I started the calendar idea,  I’d not considered needing a cover photo, so it was proposed that I chose the Sea Scouts and Sea Dart II, thinking that organization would be one to mention as a possible group to support.  This is a break-even enterprise for me, but if you want to pay more, make a donation to the local Sea Scouts, whose Ship 228 I chose for the cover.  Contact them here.

Here are some photos from the Sea Scout group doing chart training and

hand saluting.

So the calendar . . . here are some ..

sample pages.

Your votes guided my choices.  In one case, I had to switch an image (the April shot of a container ship under the VZ Bridge) to make the photo fit.  In a few cases, no proposed image had a majority, so I included more than one image.

In a few cases, I added some related images.  I hope you will be happy with the result.

As to the actual calendar-making process, it was eye-opening.  I chose VistaPrint (Waltham MA) because I was happy with work/price from them in the past.  Vistaprint is owned by Cimpress, an Irish company that was founded in France.  When I completed the assembly process and sent the credit card number, I got a receipt saying it was sold by Vistaprint in Venlo, Netherlands.  When the box of calendars arrived, the shipping label stated “Printed in Canada” but was shipped from Reno NV.  Mind boggling! This is the global supply chain involved in creating a calendar for a guy in NYC who is handling “order-fulfillment” himself to cut out [the additional] the intermediaries.

It reminds me of a William Langewiesche article I read years ago, which starts out with him telling of flying an air cargo jet over the Himalayas carrying air pallets of Chicago telephone books, back when there were still paper telephone books.  It also reminds me of learning that my MMD-related urine sample was jet FedEx’d to a federally-approved facility in the Midwest;  now I can’t look at a FedEx jet flying overhead and wondering what manner of biosamples it may be transporting.

I printed only 50, so get your calendar ASAP.  My plan for Monday is to carrying a bunch down to the post office.  To repeat, if you want one, email me your address.  Paypal to my email address is an option;  if you want to send a check, email me and I’ll get you my mailing address.  Pieces-of-eight are fine; cryptocurrency is not, nor are sand dollars.

Enjoy one of the shortest days of the year, and the first winter sunrise in the sixth boro is not until 0715 on December 22.

 

. . . Lama Don A . . . ?  well, of course it’s La Madonna, but when I heard the on the VHF, my first thought was what I put as title.

She’s part of the LA International fleet and following in the wake of Sarah Dann, delivering more modules for the Shell ethane cracker in Potter township Pennsylvania by way of the GOM, Mississippi, and a long way up the Ohio.  The Shell plant employs 5000 people and will cost an estimated $6 billion to construct.  More on ethane here.

As of this posting, Sarah Dann, towing another module,  is mid-Gulf of Mexico.

La Madonna is a 6000 hp tug, 112′ x 32′.

 

This module was assembled in Brewer, Maine. 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Uh . . .

Other than that the name of the vessel below seems entirely Thai, I don’t know what to say.

Want a list of Stolt tankers?  Click here. Sypress, I believe, is the Norwegian name for the conifer tree spelled differently in English.  For all the ones already posted in tugster, click here.

Battersea Park . . .  is a park south of the Thames.

Low light photos are only sometimes interesting . . .

At first one might think Glovis is the vessel name, but upon closer study,

clearly it’s not and the company is likely Korean, given the text.  Previous Glovis vessels can be found here.

Cariboo is a 2012 scrap-loaded bulk carrier currently most of the way to Egypt;  where it goes from there I don’t know, but  scrapped beams, cars, trucks, and boats end up in the hold of vessels like Cariboo.

And finally, we return to that first vessel, the nameless one.  My suspicion is that it may be between owners.  The IMO number, however, stays with the vessel like a VIN, and the IMO number says that the name might be/have been Energy Trophy, a crude tanker.

All photos and any errors by Will Van Dorp.

Maybe someone can explain this . . .   late last week, six ROROs, of which one was Glovis Comet arrived in the port.   Six!  Is this odd?  Am I missing something?

 

 

It seems most appropriate to juxtapose that building with an ocean-going ship.  The physical aspect of world trade happens thanks to ships.

And the names allude to this, like Mediterranean Shipping Company (aka MSC) Lucy and Mustafa Dayi.

Or Zim Yokohama and Lian Yang Hu.

Atlantic Journey, 

Ever Linking, and

Ocean Pearl:  they almost make a declarative sentence. And Ocean Pearl‘s cargo comes from North Africa.

RHL Agilitas . . .  Her name is Spanish, she’s recently been in ports in Columbia, Guatemala, and Mexico, but the “H” in RHL is Hamburg.

High Tide seems as English as the 4th of July (:)) but the company D’Amico began in Italy. 

I mentioned to someone recently that the harbor is full of secrets hidden in plain sight, and that’s why I keep coming back.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

All All but one of the photos in this post come from David Silver, assigned as a cadet this summer on a Maersk vessel going halfway around the world and back.  He departed Port Elizabeth on May 21.  This post follows his voyage, focusing on what someone like me–mostly fixed–doesn’t see.

May 24.  Charleston.  Mark Moran.

May 30. Houston.   Thor.

 

May 31.  Houston.  Wesley A.

June 06.  Norfolk.   Maxwell Paul Moran.

June 08.  Pilot boards in sixth boro of NYC.  JRT Moran.

June 08.  VZ Bridge as seen from the ship and

as seen from my location, at about the same moment.

June 09.  Port  Elizabeth.   Kirby Moran. 

There was a stop in Algeciras–the world’s 10th largest transshipment port– but no photos of assist tugboats.

June 25.  Suez Canal.  It could be one of the Mosaed boats, maybe number 1.

June 26.  Suez Canal.  One of the boats called Salam.

After transiting the Red Sea and stopping in Djibouti, July 9.  Mont Arrey, 

they rounded the peninsula and entered the Gulf.

July 9.  Jebel Ali.  P&O Venture.  That could be P&O Energy off the stern.

 

July 12.  Port Qasim.  SL Hodeida  with pilot boat and other Smit Lamnalco tugs.

July 13.  Port Pipavav.  It appears to be Ocean Supreme and another one of the Ocean Sparkle boats in the distance.

 

I have enjoyed seeing this variety of towing vessels from this trip halfway around the world.  Now I hope the return trip brings more photos and a safe return in late August.

Many thanks, David.

Growing up in a beautiful rural place, I never imagined some day living in the largest megalopolis on the US.  But here we are; I live in a concentration with over 50 million others.  That many people and consumers together has implications.  Click on the map to see source.

Here’s how a plethora of goods comes in . . . .

Ten years ago, single vessels this large never transited the sixth boro…

Just yesterday, no fewer than three of these ULCS found themselves in port, and they’ll soon push today’s limits.

So I have my own word for them:  megaboxforus.  Megaboxforuses . . . could be the plural.

 

 

 

And they change hands . . . Edison not long ago was Maersk Edison.  Maersk possibly traded in a 1200′ for a 1300′.

See the paint outs?

 

This morning Cosco Shipping Peony–the first of its class–arrived just before adequate light for photos.  I hope some one gets photos during its first sixth boro stay.

And once the boxes leave the ULCS, they go into the hinterland on steel rails or–less efficiently–on a single chassis pulled by a tractor.

These statistics are quickly becoming obsolete.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Thanks to Tony A, whose previous contributions can be found here, here’s an insider’s view of a scrap ferrous metal run, starting with a view across the deep “hold” of the scow as it exits the Buttermilk heading for whichever of the sixth boro’s creeks has the product.

Once loaded, the scow is brought ship side.

Note the multiple load marks . . .

As the crane transfers the scrap into the hold of the ship, the tug may move to a safe distance or do another run.  By tomorrow, bulker Nichirin will be arriving in Iskenderun, Turkey, 15 miles from the Syrian border and less than 30 from Aleppo.

Photos I’ve taken over the years of scrap metals runs include these of Crow, in blue and

in red.

And here I think it’s Sarah Ann doing a really efficient run.

Thanks to Tony for the top four photos.  The bottom three are by Will Van Dorp.

And come to think of it, I wonder if the late great Crow has ended up in Iskenderun also….

 

Here’s another set of recent photos, all taken by Jan Oosterboer, and all showing traffic quite different from what you’d see on our side of the A-Ocean.

Start with these four tugs, three by Fairmount.  In the lead, it’s Fairmount Expedition, rated at 16320 bhp, and 205 ton bollard pull.   She’s Japan-built 2007.

0aaaapr1vier sleepboten - foto Jan@Oosterboer-0508

Second in that line, FairPlay 33, 8160 bhp,  is Romania-built 2011, likely constructed in the yard where Allie B towed the old Quincy Goliath crane.

0aaaapr2FAIRPLAY-33-0547

Check the Fairmount link above for the particulars on Alpine and

0aaaapr3FAIRMOUNT ALPINE-0593

Sherpa.

0aaaapr4FAIRMOUNT SHERPA-0619

Union Sovereign, 2003 and China built and rated at 16500 bhp.

0aaaapr5UNION SOVEREIGN-0692

Going from chartreuse to primer red . . . .this is a multicat shallow draft vessel built in Gdansk to be completed in greater Rotterdam.  Click here and here to see how this vessel gets launched.

0aaaapr6MULTICAT YN-571673-0286

 

The unfinished multicat is towed here by Egesund, a tug that could most easily fit in in the sixth boro.   The offset house allows more deck equipment to be fitted.

0aaaapr7EGESUND-0326

0aaaapr8EGESUND en NORMAND FLIPPER-0252

And finally . . . above and below, it’s Norman Flipper, 2003 and Norway built.

0aaapr9NORMAND FLIPPER-0300

 

These photos by Jan Oosterboer come via Fred Trooster, to whom both I am grateful.

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