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Technological marvel and global supply chains spawned by the deindustrialization of this country go hand in hand with these huge vessels.  CMA CGM J. Adams comes in with +14,000 teu, a peak capacity reached in August 2017 when her sister vessel T. Roosevelt arrived first. 

That’s 1202′ x 166′ and running deep. 

Tokyo Triumph comes in slightly smaller, 13,870 teu and 1197′ x 168′.

CMA CGM Argentina brings in +15,000 teu on her 1200′ x 167′.

Monaco Bridge carries in 13900 teu on a 1197′ x 168′.

Wanna guess for OOCL Chongqing?

Her 1202′ x 158′ dimensions transport 13,208 teus.

CMA CGM Alexander von Humboldt comes in at the top, +16,000 teu on dimensions of 1299′ x 177′.

That puts her in the class with CMA CGM’s Marco Polo and Jules Verne as the largest trio to call in the sixth boro so far.  She’s been here before, I believe, but this is my first time to see her.  

These ULVCs are sometimes referred to as CMA CGM’s Explorer class box boats.  If you’re unfamiliar with the the name, Von Humboldt surely deserves to be grouped with Polo and Verne.  See his bio here.

USACE Dobrin followed the ULCV around Bergen Point.

And then, there’s the case of Ever Forward, shown here in a photo shared by Captain Nemo. Ever Forward is the newest of the ULCVs in this post, carrying 11,850 teus on dimensions of 1096′ x 157′.  Ever Frustrated is likely how her owners, crew, and recipients of cargo must now feel.   Ever Forward would have called in NYC this past week, as have her sisters of the Ever F class. 

All photos except Ever Forward, WVD, who is responsible for any errors of fact. 

I happened onto a very busy sunrise this morning, five ships of which two were ULCVs and a half dozen of so tugboats can be seen.

The first ULCV was CMA CGM Chile,

and the light, as last night’s Hunter’s Moon settled in the west, was perfect.

Marie J Turecamo and Margaret Moran assisted,

Here were Mexico and Brazil.

The sixth boro terminals are doing something right, because no backups as in southern California and Savannah are happening here.

All photos, WVD.

Today’s post recognizes the variety of ships calling in the sixth boro.  Like a bulker Medi Astoria,

cement self-unloader NACC New Yorker,

a very large but not quite VLCC crude carrier Sonangol Cabinda,

small bulker Century Dream,

crude tanker Bergitta,

[I wonder how coating damage like this happens.]

a 6500 teu Maersk Sembawang named for a district in Singapore,

a 9500 teu Ever Lyric,

a 14,000 teu CMA CGM A. Adams,

and another 14,000 teu ONE Apus.  As to ONE Apus, she’s currently at Global terminals, but I took this photo back in May 2019.   I believe this is her first return to the sixth boro after her loss of almost 2000 containers in the Pacific late last year.

All photos, WVD.

In whjat must be record time for a ULCV, J. Adams arrived Saturday midday and has already departed.

 

Most of you know that dawn is my favorite time. Yesterday dawn–between 0545 and 0645–was quite busy;  two of the five vessels that transited the KVK were among the largest–so far–that call in the sixth boro.

Pink sky with gradations, faded purple Brooklyn, huge but silent shapes, and spots of artificial lights.

Birds silhouetted and reflections in the still water make the scene as one point over by central western Brooklyn turns a deeper shade of red.

When the ship blocks the blinding rising sun, its name becomes legible.

Once CS Rose passes my vantage point, all that light illuminates the details.  Three tugboats along her starboard, one on stern, and one on the far side, the port side.

Not much later–another smaller container ship has passed–the next hulking shape appears, and the light has already turned gradations of yellow.

When CMA CGM Mexico blocks the rising sun, details become available  . . .

 

By now, 0645, the light suggests the sun has created daylight.

 

Tugboats on Rose include  James D, Mary Turecamo, Kimberly Turecamo, and Kirby.  Tugboats on Mexico include Marie J Turecamo, JRT, Kimberly Turecamo, and Miriam.

All photos, WVD.

 

The erudite readers of tugster know Evergreen doesn’t have a single vessel, the one that caused some anxiety in Suez recently.  In fact, the fleet comprises about 200 ships, of different sizes or classes.  The L and F classes currently call in the sixth boro.  The teu capacity for the F class is just over 12000.  In other words, the vessel that departed the sixth boro this morning holds 8000 fewer containers than Ever Given, coming in over 20000 teu.    Another way of visualizing it is this:  add all the containers of this F class boat AND all from an L class vessel . . . and you’ll have one Ever G class.  And consider this, an Evergreen A class is on the drawing board . . .  coming in between 22k and 23k containers!

Enough alphabetizing . . . Ever Faith is currently on its way to Baltimore.

 

 

 

All photos, WVD, who had a hard time coming indoors today to download these photos and post.

Find a great diagram here, as well as this quote:  “container carrying capacity has increased 1200% since 1968.”  This increased size drives developments in escort tugs.

As of 2021, the sixth boro has accommodated vessels no larger than 15,000 teu, like CMA CGM Argentina.  These can be called mother ships, since they can call in only a limited number of ports in the US for reasons of draft, air draft, and crane size. Vying for position as the largest, Liebherr appears to have a 25-row crane design, while ZPMC has a 26-row product.

Count them, it looks like Argentina has 20 rows across.  Imagine each of these row, each of these containers, as towed by a truck on the highway lane beside you.

YM Wellhead, an odd name in my opinion, is one of 20 W-class 14,000 teu ships.   World was the first of this class that I caught. 

 

She departed the sixth boro yesterday, sans the container that crossed the VZ as she made her way out.

Back in spring 2017, Cosco Development was the largest container ship to transit the new locks in Panama.  Her capacity is just over 13,000 teu.

 

At least half dozen Hyundai vessels have called in the sixth boro of late, all around 13000 teu.

I was surprised when the docking pilot boarded up the companionway.

 

Cosco Shipping Camellia is one of more than half dozen Cosco Shipping “flower-class” vessels to call hewre, all around 13,500 teu.

 

Orchid is a sister vessel, and in the next day or so, Sakura will arrive.

The most powerful escort tugboats in the sixth boro shrink in size alongside these behemoths.

All photos and interpretation of info, WVD, who wonders what the next milestone of any sort the sixth boro will see.

Here was the part A.  CMA CGM Argentina, sister toMexico and Brazil, steamed up the coast Sunday evening, making me think I’d miss it.  But it dropped anchor 15 or so miles off Point Pleasant, and stayed there making pattern like this.  Another ULCV was similarly anchored off Jones Beach, and it came into the boro last night.  This raises a question:  are the ULCVs causing a shortage of berth space?

Early afternoon yesterday after three ULCVs–Hyundai Ambition, Cosco Shipping Camellia, Tampa Triumph— left port, Argentina was off like an arrow for Ambrose Channel.

I debated going to see it, given fading light, but … decided I needed a distraction on a Friday afternoon.

I went.  The docking pilots lands from Jonathan C, which then

swings around the stern.

End of the day twilight has its own richness;  here the straight lines of the ship (?!) contrast with the irregular lines of the city.

She’s long, stacked as they were when she left Busan, Korea’s largest port,  on December 9, and nearly dragging her belly through the silt and fluff at the bottom of the channel.

 

And I’ll bet there not more than 30′  clearance with the underside of that bridge down there.

All photos, WVD, whose previous ULCV posts, some of them, can be found here.  And I have other ULCV photos from recently I’ve not posted yet.

Unrelated but followup on the Rotterdam tug Limburgia video that sleepboot posted in a comment yesterday.  The 1942 boat has retired from commercial work and been sold.  You will enjoy looking through the photos on the sale notice.

Btw, “sleepboot” is the Dutch word for “tugboat.”

 

A big bridge and two large ships, Atlantic Sky , a

CONRO vessel, and

Hyundai Speed, part of the Together class of 13,082 teu vessels out working the oceans since 2012 already. 

Can anyone help me understand the yellowish tinge to that plume?

 

In contrast to a fully loaded Hyundai Speed,the 2012 Al Qibla had some vacancy although she’s capable of 13500 teus.

 

This is the wall of containers this bridge was raised for.

CMA CGM Mexico, and sister ships of the Argentina class, are the current biggest behemoths of the sixth boro.

YM Width (14000 teu) and

YM Warmth, 13892 teu,

are both CSCB in Taiwan built.

My vantage point, 20 years ago, would have been quite different.

All photos, WVD.

As of writing, two pink ULCVs– ONE Minato and ONE Hawk–share the cranes at Global Terminals. That would be a great photo, but I’m tied up this morning.

Recently, I waited around for another one of the CMA CGM Explorer series ULCVs.   So far, I’ve seen Vespucci.  That leaves von Humbolt, Colomb, Laperouse, Verne, Magellan, Polo, and Zheng.

Foreshadowing:  JRT is cutting ahead of CMA CGM Corte Real to go to the next job.

The “explorer” in this case is obscure on this side of the world.  Gaspar Corte Real was a 15th-century explorer memorialized by a statue in St. John’s Newfoundland.

More foreshadowing:  Margaret has the honors here of retrieving the docking pilot.

This photo was taken a half hour after the previous ones. That’s JRT cutting across the Narrows to position for the next job . . .

an APL ULCV that Margaret is already alongside.

JRT closes in on the bow of APL Sentosa,named for an amusement resort in Singapore.

She’s the longest ULCV to call in the sixth boro, to date, I believe. Prove me wrong. She’s listed at 1207′ x 167′ whereas Corte Real has the same beam but is seven feet shorter.

Here the two ULCVs meet.  Between them, they have capacity of 27,238 containers.  both ULCVs loaded in Sri Lanka in early August.  I’m wondering if anyone there got a photo of the two together in the port of Colombo.

 

As to relative size of ULCV to tugboat, notice the two crew on the bow of tug (in blue green)  and stern of ship (in orange with white helmet)?

Here’s a closer up, where you can see the messenger line coming down . . . just about to hit the deck.  The deckhand will grab it, make the messenger to the tow line, and the ship’s crew will bring it back to the ship.

 

All photos, WVD.

0545 at the Narrows . . . in the hazy days of summer . . . nothing beats it.

I had not come here just to beat the heat.

Surprisingly, Turecamo Girls (I believe) delivered the docking pilot.

Then she dropped back, to where one of the 6000s took the stern and

another the bow.

Only a couple hours into the day, another ULCV appeared in the offing . . .

Hyundai Drive, which sounds almost like a car ad framed as an order if you reverse the words . . . .

In the clearer light, you can clearly see Drive‘s crew asisting the docking pilot, boarding from Capt. Brian A.

 

For scale, notice the deckhand on the bow waiting . . .

. . .

for the messenger line.

To digress a bit, in July 2018 Hyundai Jupiter was in the sixth boro, and the company was still called Hyundai.  On March 31, 2020, it rebranded itself as HMM.  Jupiter, 1059′ loa,  had a capacity of 10,000 teu.

In March 2013, Hyundai Grace, a 2007 build, had a capacity of 4571 teu on her 964′ hull.

In April 2009, Hyundai Voyager was in town . . . built in 2008 with the same dimensions as Grace.

So in a decade, typical Hyundai (HMM) vessels calling here have increasing carrying capacity by nearly 300%. If you consider HMM calling elsewhere, the increase has been greater than 500%.

All photos, WVD.

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