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As of writing, two pink ULCVs– ONE Minato and ONE Hawk–share the cranes at Global Terminals. That would be a great photo, but I’m tied up this morning.

Recently, I waited around for another one of the CMA CGM Explorer series ULCVs.   So far, I’ve seen Vespucci.  That leaves von Humbolt, Colomb, Laperouse, Verne, Magellan, Polo, and Zheng.

Foreshadowing:  JRT is cutting ahead of CMA CGM Corte Real to go to the next job.

The “explorer” in this case is obscure on this side of the world.  Gaspar Corte Real was a 15th-century explorer memorialized by a statue in St. John’s Newfoundland.

More foreshadowing:  Margaret has the honors here of retrieving the docking pilot.

This photo was taken a half hour after the previous ones. That’s JRT cutting across the Narrows to position for the next job . . .

an APL ULCV that Margaret is already alongside.

JRT closes in on the bow of APL Sentosa,named for an amusement resort in Singapore.

She’s the longest ULCV to call in the sixth boro, to date, I believe. Prove me wrong. She’s listed at 1207′ x 167′ whereas Corte Real has the same beam but is seven feet shorter.

Here the two ULCVs meet.  Between them, they have capacity of 27,238 containers.  both ULCVs loaded in Sri Lanka in early August.  I’m wondering if anyone there got a photo of the two together in the port of Colombo.

 

As to relative size of ULCV to tugboat, notice the two crew on the bow of tug (in blue green)  and stern of ship (in orange with white helmet)?

Here’s a closer up, where you can see the messenger line coming down . . . just about to hit the deck.  The deckhand will grab it, make the messenger to the tow line, and the ship’s crew will bring it back to the ship.

 

All photos, WVD.

0545 at the Narrows . . . in the hazy days of summer . . . nothing beats it.

I had not come here just to beat the heat.

Surprisingly, Turecamo Girls (I believe) delivered the docking pilot.

Then she dropped back, to where one of the 6000s took the stern and

another the bow.

Only a couple hours into the day, another ULCV appeared in the offing . . .

Hyundai Drive, which sounds almost like a car ad framed as an order if you reverse the words . . . .

In the clearer light, you can clearly see Drive‘s crew asisting the docking pilot, boarding from Capt. Brian A.

 

For scale, notice the deckhand on the bow waiting . . .

. . .

for the messenger line.

To digress a bit, in July 2018 Hyundai Jupiter was in the sixth boro, and the company was still called Hyundai.  On March 31, 2020, it rebranded itself as HMM.  Jupiter, 1059′ loa,  had a capacity of 10,000 teu.

In March 2013, Hyundai Grace, a 2007 build, had a capacity of 4571 teu on her 964′ hull.

In April 2009, Hyundai Voyager was in town . . . built in 2008 with the same dimensions as Grace.

So in a decade, typical Hyundai (HMM) vessels calling here have increasing carrying capacity by nearly 300%. If you consider HMM calling elsewhere, the increase has been greater than 500%.

All photos, WVD.

Glovis Cosmos has a beam of 105′.  YM Warmth . . . 167′.  Of course, we’re looking at the pier from an angle,so there’s that accentuating the difference in beam.  We’ll return to YM Warmth.

The next day just after 0600, CMA CGM A. Lincoln appeared around Bergen Point with an entourage of tugboats.

 

 

As big as these 1200′ box ships are, they will be diminshed by the 1312′ size working other ports around the watery globe.

To make my morning even better, Warmth was bound for sea the same time as A. Lincoln.

 

As booming as the ports of NY/NJ seem to be, they’re asking for relief money, as explained here, with the cost of temperature checks on local port workers adding up to $60,000 weekly.

All photos, WVD.  That morning, obviously, two 1200’ers left port in succession.  As I write this [Sunday morning] three of the current sixthboromax vessels are in our fair port.  For a look at the next generation, in this case coming into Rotterdam, check out this video . . . and I’d jump ahead to the 23-minute mark . . . behold the 20,000 teu 1312′ Ever Given.

Two final points . . .  I find it odd that CMA CGM has named these vessels for former US presidents.  Imagine US-flagged ships with names like Jules Armand Dufaure or Charles Dupuy  . . .

And second, for a glimpse of CMA CGM plans in the next two years, check out CMA CGM Jacques Saade,  named for the company founder.

First off, I missed CMA CGM La Perouse, which left before daylight this morning. I had to look up La Perouse, since it was a French word I didn’t know.  It turns out that it’s a person, an accomplished 18th century French explorer of the Pacific.  Click here for a map of his explorations, along with French spellings of places you know;  Mauwee is my favorite.  Given this identity for this ship, this ULCV then fits into the “explorer” class of CMA CGM, the other vessels shown here.  Sp far, I’ve posted only CMA CGM Amerigo VespucciMagellan has been in the sixth boro, but I missed it.

Al Quibla is one of the middle-sized UASC vessels, at 13, 296 teu.

The largest UASC box boat right now is over 18,000 teu.  Back in April, I saw Al Qibla‘s sister vessel Unayzah, but not posted it until today below.  Unayzah at that time still had the Hapag-Lloyd livery.

 

Al quibla is the Arabic word for “direction.”

Hyundai Speed was launched in 2012, and has carrying capacity of 13, 100 teu.  Here Ava sidles up to escort it into the Global Terminal.

 

Recently I caught CMA CGM T. Jefferson departing.  She’s of the same class as T. Roosevelt and J. Adams.

 

Cosco Shipping has its “flower” class, with Peony and all the others. 

Capacious as these vessels are, much larger ones sail the seas.  Correct me if I’m wrong, but no vessel over 15,000 teu has yet called in the sixth boro.

All photos, WVD.

I’m still not over how large these vessels are.  Note the two Moran tugs off the stern of ONE Minato.

As for numbers, she’s 1200′ x 167′.  They’re all approximately this length, which is roughly what the Empire State Building is without its spire.  She has capacity of 13,900 teu.  She was built near Hiroshima in 2018.  Currently she’s off Algeria and heading for the sixth boro, eta August 21.

CS Jasmine is the same length as ONE Minato, but at 157′ is 10 feet less broad.

Her capacity is 13,500 teu.  She was built in Shanghai in 2018.  Currently she’s eastbound in the Pacific, expected to arrive at the Panama Canal on August 22.

CS Rose is basically identical to CS Jasmine.  She’s expected to arrive in her sixth boro berth on August 19, ie, next week.

 

Hyundai Pride has the same dimensions as CS Jasmine and Rose.

Pride is currently in Busan, not far from where she was built in 2014.   Her capacity is 13,500 teu.

There are more to come, but for now we end with YM Witness.  By the numbers, she’s 1207′ x 167′, carrying capacity of 13,800 teu.  She was built in 2015 in Ulsan, not far north of Busan on South Korea’s SE coast.

She’s currently heading for Vietnam from China, passing Hong Kong.

These are not the largest container ships currently afloat.  HMM Dublin, appearing quite similar to Hyundai Pride,  is 1312′ x 200′ and has a carrying capacity of 23000 teu and is currently underway between Rotterdam and Singapore around Cape of Good Hope, a 24-day voyage.

All photos and reported numbers, WVD.

Jasmine and Rose are two of eight, all ordered mid-year 2015  At about $120 million each, that’s close to a billion dollar order handed to the Shanghai Jiangnan Changxing Shipbuilding Ltd. co., right across the river from Shanghai proper.  Google-map that to get a sense of the shipbuilding and shipping infrastructure along the mouth of the Yangtze.

Mary Turecamo overtook Jasmine at the perfect moment to give the sense of projected power, while Jonathan C holds back and otherwise guides the stern.

 

 

A few days later, a clone arrives from the Ambrose Channel . . .,

one of the clones that I’ve not yet seen.  I’ve have seen Peony, Camellia, and Sakura.  I believe I’ve yet to see Azelea, Lotus, and Orchid.  I’ve seen some of them come and go, but just didn’t have reason enough to go out to see a clone.

Whenever you see a clutch of tugs like this, you know they’re waiting, and the more tugs, the bigger the escortee.

Maybe someone can instruct me on the air draft of these ULCVs.

JRT delivers the docking pilot.

To conclude with an echo back to the scale posts . . . see the 2014-built Taipei Trader off the port bow of Rose.  Both are container ships but their size is vastly different.  One way to think of it, it would take 13 Taipei Traders to carry the same number of containers as Rose.

All photos, WVD, who wants to know if there is a term used for small “feeder” box boats like Taipei Trader.

 

Here was the first in the series.  It does seem a greater percentage of container ships calling in the the sixth boro are  ULCVs.  Hyundai Hope arrived here on Saturday.

and from here, where she departed midmorning today,  she goes into the port of Wilmington.  She must be a sight to see there.  HMM, Hyundai Merchant Marine, dates back to 2010.  Hyundai Hope was built in 2014 and carries 13154 teu.

OOCL Korea, built 2014 and capacity of 13300 teu, came in recently on a windy day . . . .  The gargantuan size is illustrated by the the two McAllister tugs that seem almost to disappear off her stern.

OOCL Korea  is appearing on this blog for the first time.

Two of them meet in Ambrose Channel, along with an incoming Torm tanker as well.

Season Harrier, first of a series of newbuilds, called here recently.

.

Gunhilde Maersk, at 7000 teu and built in 2008, left here 10 days ago and is already in the Red Sea.

OOCL Chongqing was built in 2013 and carries just over 13k teu.

 

All photos, WVD, who misses more than half of the ULCVs that call . . . .

Ever wonder the per-mile cost of moving a container via rail car versus via ship?  Answers here.

Update on the calendar voting, i.e., “polling… 1 through 4”   you’ve now seen the options for each month, but voting remains open, and I’m still accepting candidates for the December page.  And I’m grateful for all the voting so far.

Less than a handful of years back, a buzz could be heard in all the boros about these new ships that were going to arrive.  Well, they did and now seem routine.

Antwerpen Express departed the other day.

She and all the other ULCVs are longer than the Chrysler Building, once the first building to exceed 1000′, is tall.  The Chrysler is now obscured by all the taller buildings in the distance.

The same morning, the next “flower ULCV” departed.   We’ve seen Jasmine, Peony, and Camellia . ..   welcome  . . .

Sakura!!  aka cherry blossom.

The Moran 6000s arelarge tugboats, but here Jonathan C barely extends upward of the bottom paint.

 

Yesterday I drove past a trucking company yard with lots of trailers.  Compared with the “trailer boxes” you see here, that trucking yard was tiny.

“O ship!!” indeed!

 

And the story does not end here;  later Sunday afternoon–the day I took these photos–another ULCV YM Warmth arrived, but I was tied up and couldn’t run out to get a photo.   O ship!!!

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Peony has appeared on this blog twice, but this is the first time for Jasmine.

I waited at the Narrows until one of the two box ships I was eyeing headed out yesterday, a hot seat in spite of the shade and the breezes, and Jasmine was first.  The other was the irregularly named ONE Contribution, a large pink ship you can see here.  It’s pink but not a ULCV.

Peony and Jasmine are about 1000 teu smaller than the mountain class….   Camellia, Azalea, Lotus, Orchid, Rose, and Sakura make up the rest of the flower class.

Anyone know the airdraft of these boats?

 

 

As of this writing, she’s headed for Norfolk

through the summer haze.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is wondering the relationship between the abstract boats like Cosco Faith, Glory the country boats like Cosco Vietnam,  and the flower boats.

Click here for an interesting article by Capt. Max Hardberger called “China’s Dominance in Shipping” on the long-term strategic global hegemonic implications of these ships and lines and our consumerism.  Seized is a great read.

 

Triton is a fitting name* for the current record-holding largest ULCV to call in the sixth boro.  If the Panamanians call it that after CMA CGM T. Roosevelt-also in the sixth boro this week–call it that, that passes muster as true for me, since they charge fees by this criterion.

The photos above and below come from Marcin Kocoj, who caught it departing Port Elizabeth and then passing Caddell’s in the KVK.

*Triton was built by Samsung in Geoje South Korea in 2016 has already had a handful of names. She’s moved along by 85705 hp.

The photo above and another version of it below come from Capt. Tom Ferrie, Sandy Hook pilot who took it out to sea late Friday afternoon.

Now I imagine someone in an airplane a half dozen miles over the Atlantic Ocean looking out the window and spotting it, a tiny sliver of multi-colored boxes followed by a wake, a massive ship in a much-more immense ocean.

I suppose 10 years from now, we’ll look back at Triton in the context of even larger vessels. 

Here’s more.

Many thanks to Marcin and Tom for use of these photos.

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