You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘McAllister Brothers’ tag.

The first three come thanks to Steve Munoz . . .  HMS Bounty heading up the North River in May 1998.

Taken November 2001, it’s Adventure of the Seas heading upriver with an diverse escort.  Given the date, this would have been her maiden voyage into the sixth boro of NYC.  John D. McKean and what appears to be another fireboat beyond her, a USCG 140′ cutter, and lots of commercial tugboats see her in.  Adventure of the Seas is currently in Sint Maarten, along with at least four fleetmates.

From October 1986, David McAllister is on the starboard bow of Borenquin heading into Port Elizabeth.

From John Jedrlinic, it’s Laney Chouest in Tampa.  The blue/white vessel at Laney‘s bow is the Aiviq, the  AHTS built for ice.  You may recall its challenges back in 2012.

and C-Tractor 8 . . . taken in October 2016.

And from last week, Craig Lewis sent along these photos of McAllister Brothers awaiting its fate in Fall River.

Since launch in 1958, how many tons of grub and coffee have crews ingested in this galley of the Brothers . . !?

And finally, last but not least, Skip Mildrum noticed some interesting cargo in Port Elizabeth recently . . .

Might they be new Kawasaki subway cars, four of an order of 535 R211 cars coming to a subway stop near you one of these days?   They might not be, given his estimate of car length;   R211s are only 60′ loa.

Skip’s estimate of the trailers was at least 120′.  Also, the R211s are built in Nebraska . .  .

Many thanks to Steve, John, Craig, and Skip for these photos.

Steve’s uncle Bob was a captain and pilot on the Dalzelleagle/McAllister Bros from 1968 to 1985.  That makes for a special connection and lots of vintage photos.  Enjoy these thanks to Steve.  I’ll use his captions.

Dalzelleagle assisting ship in East River in September 1968.

Dalzelleagle heading down Buttermilk Channel-from pier 12 Brooklyn in September 1970.  The tug is interesting, but so are the details in the background.

Cook Ralph Andreason waves from the stern on Dalzelleagle departing 69th St pier Brooklyn in September 1970.

McAllister Bros in North River off Hoboken pier on August 24, 1973.

The is the same time and place, roughly.  The Twin Towers had opened earlier that year.

Tug McAllister Bros leading Atlantic Champagne thru Newark Bay Draw on July 5, 1976. This picture brings to mind a story that my Uncle Bob Munoz told me. Bob was a captain and pilot on the Dalzelleagle/McAllister Bros from 1968 to 1985. One time he was piloting a ship in Newark Bay toward the Newark Bay Draw Bridge and a woman passenger came over to him on the bridge of the ship and asked him if the ship was going through that little opening in the bridge. Bob said that they were. She then asked how he did that. So he looked at her and said, “When we get real close I just close my eyes.”    Atlantic Champagne, an ACL vessel, was launched in 1969 with a teu capacity of a dazzling 882 teu.

McAllister Bros in Newark Bay from a ship on June 26, 1987.  That CRRNJ bridge was used starting in 1926;  I saw some remaining piers about a decade ago, but it is entirely gone now.  Given the raising of the Bayonne Bridge, keep in mind that vertical clearance here was 136′.  Maybe someone can tell me the width of the channel.

McAllister Bros galley on January 11, 2001,

and her engine room on the same date.

And finally, McAllister Brothers here along with Christine M. McAllister on November 6, 2006.

It’s hard to say good bye.  Many thanks to Steve for use of these photos.

And thanks to Birk Thomas for posting this on FB today, Dalzell Towing.

First, see these three photos from 2009 with updates.  I passed by this spot in Seaford DE this past week . . . on a mission, and the former Flagship Nanticoke Queen restaurant is no more.  Only a graded lot remains where the USS McKeever Brothers (SP-683) WW1 patrol and minesweeper vessel and fishing boat both before that and after the war once was. Route 13 has a bit less character.   The wooden hull was likely buried in a landfill.

From 2009, this is the 1958 Jakobson-built Dalzelleagle and then McAllister Brothers.  And yesterday, she was was towed away to be scrapped. At temperatures between 2500 and 2750°F, that steel will puddle and take new shapes.  Tomorrow I’ll post more photos of this 1958 beauty.

Another photo from 2009 of the 1907 Pegasus . . .  now also history and headed for the same high temperatures and red hot puddles.

A photo from 2012 . . . Siberian Sea, still afloat, and currently called Mike Azzolino.

Also still extant, in fact, David Silver took this photo less than a week ago, the May 1921 launched Day Peckinpaugh.  Yes, that is the Erie Canal between Locks E2 and E3.  The canal water level  is drawn down in the winter/spring for maintenance.

May 21, 1921 precisely was the day Interwaterways 101 came off the ways at the McDougall-Duluth Company shipyard.   Shouldn’t we hold a socially distanced party for the freight ship?

Here was the neat and active Eriemax freighter in 1961.

Thanks to David and Craig for use of their Day Peckinpaugh photos;  the others from 2009 and 2012, WVD.

As to the tragedy of 231′ x 71′ Seacor Power, Seacor Supporter, 131′ x 66′ , came to do some work in the sixth boro here a few years ago. Brazos is 145′ x 100′.

 

The “4” here refers to the dry dock, not the fourth post in this series.  The last post on Caddell  was Something Different 57.  And in the “high and dry” series, this would be number 11.  I’m just trying to anchor this post in the previous body of work. Also, I believe this dry dock was originally built as an auxilliary floating dry dock (ARD) by the USN to lift submarines out of their watery habitat, but I can’t corroborate that.

In Dry Dock 4 a half dozen years ago was the pilot boat New York.  I put this first so that the vessels in the rest of the photos can be compared against a standard, the dimensions of the same dry dock.

See above for scale.  On this date, winter 2014, Dry Dock 4 was shared by W. O. Decker and schooner Pioneer, currently both in Albany getting refurbished and improved. 

This boat’s a mystery to me;  the livery on upper pilothouse says it’s a Reinauer boat, but I took this photo over 10 years ago and have lost track of its identity.  You may know?

McAllisters Brothers was originally called Dalzelleagle.  I believe it’s currently in the sixth boro but mothballed.

The Fireboat John J. Harvey had some work done in Dry Dock 4 .  She has a long and storied career.

Doris Moran is a 4610 hp tugboat that does some sixth boro work, although she’s currently in Louisiana.

East Coast has not appeared on this blog very often.  She used to tow the sugar barge, and she may well still do so.

Let’s get to the end of this post with Clipper City, having some bottom work done on a cold winter’s day eight years ago already. 

All photos, WVD, who’d love to know more about the history of Dry Dock 4.

 

 

Recently I got a request for something on single screw tugs.  Ask . .  and receive, from the archives.

May 1, 2011  . .  the 1901 Urger was on the dry dock wall in Lyons looking all spiffy.  A month later, she’d be miles away and alive.

On March 19, 2010, the 1907 Pegasus had all the work done she was scheduled for, and the floating dry dock is sinking here.  In 10 minutes, Pegasus would be afloat and a yard tug … draw her out.

On a cold day last winter, a shot of the 1912 Grouper, in dry dock, waiting for a savior.   If you’re savvy and have deep reservoirs of skill and money, you can likely have her cheap.

In that same dry dock, the 1926 boxy superstructure DeWitt Clinton.

To digress, here’s how her much-lower clearance looked when first launched in Boothbay.

Back on July 30, 2017, I caught the 1929 Nebraska getting some life-extension work.   Unlike the previous single screw boats, Nebraska has a Kort nozzle surrounding its prop, which clearly is away getting some work done on it also.

On February 10, 2010, the 1931 Patty Nolan was on the hard.  She was put back in, but currently she’s back on the hard, with plans to float her again this summer.

A CanalCorp boat, I believe this is Dana, was in dry dock in Lyons this past winter.  If so, she’s from 1935.

As you’ve noticed, single screw tugs have sweet elliptical sterns.  All painted up and ready to splash, they are things of beauty.  On December 16, 2006, I caught the 1941 Daniel DiNapoli, ex-Spuyten Duyvil, about to re-enter her element.

Also in dry dock but not ready to float, on March 10, 2010, the 1958 McAllister Brothers, ex-Dalzelleagle is getting some TLC.

Is it coincidence that so many of these single screw boats are   . . . aged?  Nope.  Twin- and triple-screw boats can do many more things.  Is it only because the regulations have changed?  Have any single-screw tugs been built in recent years?  Are single-screw boat handling skills disappearing in this age of twin- and triple-screw boats?  No doubt.

All photos by WVD, who enjoyed this gallivant through the archives.

And speaking of archives, Mr Zuckerberg reminded me this morning that nine years ago exactly, the sixth boro was seeing the complicated lading of the tugs and barges being taken by heavylift ship to West Africa.  There were so many challenges that I called the posts “groundhog day” like the movie about a guy having to use many many “re-do’s” before he could get it right.

 

March 2020 has arrived, and when I brushed the cobwebs away from the March 2010 archives, I discovered I took a lot of interesting photos that month, enough to do two posts from the 2010 March set.

Let’s start with the quirky Capt. Log, captained by the friendliest person I know in the sixth boro.  I rode along on the 63′ tanker for this story.

A fleetmate of Stena Perros , Stena Primorsk, is currently anchored off Long Beach NY.  Perros is off Santos Brasil today, 2020.  Ships are designed to travel the largest part of the planet.

Firefighter was still in service 10 years ago;  now it’s a museum in Greenport NY.  After the hauling out in this post, she was repainted in her original white/black colors.

MOL Innovation is escorted in by the indefatigable Ellen McAllister.  At 961′ loa, Innovation is more than 300′ shorter than the largest container ships calling in the sixth boro these days, and I suspect the 1996 build has been scrapped.

Back in 2010, I was not using AIS, but as I drove my car over the VZ Bridge on my way to work one morning, I noticed it entering the boro;  I was very happy that I was driving to work early that day;  I got the photos and still made it to work on time.  THAT is the logic of going to work earlier than necessary, and (almost) always carrying a camera.   Now I’m sorry to report the 1995 Jumbo Spirit is aground in a scrapping yard in Aliağa.

Maersk Wisconsin, a 2000 build, has also been scrapped.   Note the Humvees being transported.

McAllister Brothers is a 1958 Jakobson product;  I believe she’s laid up in the McAllister Staten Island yard.

Eagle Service is now Genesis EagleHorizon Discovery … in the distance, she’s also been scrapped in Texas. Note the different Manhattan skyline, only a decade ago.

More soon.  All photos in March 2010 by WVD, who now needs to wash the cobwebs off.  And since learning that Jumbo Spirit has been scrapped, I decided I need one more glance.

What’s prompted the reappearance of the past here is that I’ve been sorting my archives.

So let’s start in April 2008, and this vessel will reappear tomorrow.   I miss that orange in the harbor.

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This is November 2009.  Where is McAllister Brothers (built as Dalzelleagle) these days?

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This is what Eagle Service (now Genesis Eagle) looked like in March 2010.

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Here’s a closer up of the vintage Horizon ship.  Is she still in lay up?

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Ivory Coast, headed into the KVK here on a foggy morning, appeared almost to be floating on air above the water’s surface.

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And here, a mysterious swimmer, Edith Thornton (now in Trinidad as Chassidy?), and a Hanjin ship.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders who says things stay the same.

You saw it here back in October as well as here just almost exactly a year ago at the start Summer Sea Term 2014.  More info on the itinerary here.  The first five photos come thanks to Jonathan Steinman and Rand Miller.

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Hell Gate does not often see vessels of this size and style.  For a vessel past the half century mark, TS Empire State VI has classic lines.

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Here she leaves the top end of Roosevelt Island to port.

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The rest of these photos I took.

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TS Empire State passing Evening Tide at U Thant Island

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Williamsburg Bridge

One of the two assist tugs–I’ll include more photos of the assist tugs later–was McAllister Brothers.

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The East River is spanned by eight bridges.  These two are the Brooklyn and the Manhattan Bridges.

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She traverses the Upper Bay,

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stopping only briefly as Rosemary Miller comes alongside, before

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heading through the Narrows and

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out to sea.  The plan to to drop the hook off Montauk overnight to do some drills before heading for Delaware Bay, the C & D Canal, the Chesapeake, and then Chareston SC before heading across the Atlantic.

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There are calls for a newer training vessel for SUNY here.

Many thanks to NYMedia Boat and Sean Shipco for conveyance.  Have a great summer at sea, cadets.   And again, thanks to Jonathan and Rand for photos from the “east” end of the East River.

 

Seven and a half years ago I posted on APL President Truman and  even longer ago tugster did this on Bellavia.

Enjoy a few more pics of President Truman before learning its fate.  The photo below was taken in September 2007.

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March 2009.

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June 2009.  Dimensions on President Truman are 902′ x 129.’  As such, she could not traverse the current Panama Canal.   Teu capacity on Truman is about 4500.

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In the foreground in the photo above, of course, that’s Capt. Log, now retired.  The assisting tugs are shown below.  McAllister Brothers nearer and  . . .I can’t identify . . . astern of her.

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Here from May 2009 is sister vessel President Polk, assisted by Ellen McAllister and McAllister Sisters.

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Both Polk and Truman are no more.  Nor are Adams and Jackson.  All dead.  Click here and scroll to page 41.  They were all renamed President 1, President 2 . . . and taken to Chittagong for scrapping.   I’d love to find photos of these vessels being scrapped.

Which brings us to this past weekend. And this vessel.  Teu capacity is over 8000.  Dimension 1095′ x 138.’  See the crewman standing watching on the bow . . .

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Near the salt pile they pass, Zim Monaco 4250 teu.

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Now that the process of raising the Bayonne Bridge has become, maybe some folks will imagine widening the KVK.  By the way, if you see little difference between Pacific Link and the Presidents, count the number of containers across the stern.

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And an 8000 teu vessel, as appropriate as it may be for some locations, is “compact” compared to what already sails the oceans–20,000 and up–and what is being planned: 25,000 teus and up.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Related:  MSC Oscar

Size at LA-LB

 

 

 

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Name that tug?  Answer follows.

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Kodiak . . . this is a new one for me and a one-off trip for the vessel?

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The tug here is

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Liberty Service.  And yes, that’s Chesapeake Coast in the distance.

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McKinley Sea leads Bluefin in from the anchorage.  I’m not sure why Bluefin is still gray.

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This is an impressive lineup in the late fall afternoon light:  the McAllisters Kate, Bruce, Helen, Brothers, Brian .  . and more.

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This vessel I truly don’t know.  It’s new in the harbor, and I have a hunch . . . but will keep that to myself.

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And the mystery tug at the start of this post was none other than W. O. Decker.  Here’s one of my favorite set of old photos of Decker.  Here are many others.

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All photos very recently by Will Van dorp.

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