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Summertime and the living is easy, they say.  For some.  Enjoying an easy time on the water , that’s the life for some people.  . . .    Of course, rougher and tougher is better for people like Erik Aanderaa and adventures like this.      But on this enchanted late spring morning, a wave of yachts entered the harbor, here like  Second Wind, a Bayfield cutter ketch, and Tugnacious.

Tugnacious?  Remember I told you there were several boats by that name.  This Tugnacious appears to be an American Tug pilothouse trawler.

A Dutch yacht sailed in, judging by the flag.  It had a French name, I recall starting  with S, but I can’t remember it.

As crude VLCC (?) Atina left port–more photos of that later, Moonstruck, a Catalina 470, arrived.

I don’t know the manufacturer of all of these yachts, but I’d guess Pegasus, below, is a Fisher 37 pilothouse sloop.  I love the lines.

Jilleroo had such an unusual name for a US yacht that I looked it up, and I found the brand and sale price here.

All the gear on Autumn Borne led me to suspect she’s been sailing a while, and sure enough, if I read this right, she’s a Buffalo boat that’s been in salt water a while.

Done Diggin’ is a power cat from very near my old stomping  . .  . and  paddling grounds on the PowWow River.  They appear to be loopers who also keep a blog diary.

Ketch Bella Vita . . .  I’ve not found much, but it appears to be a sweet center-cockpit 45- to 50′ cruising boat with lots of room below.

And this . . .  I’m just speechless, for this 70′ to 85′ yacht to be roaring past a small fishing boat.  It’s no wonder their name is obscured.

All photos, WVD, who has his own unrequited summer boat lusts.. . .  for now.

Unrelated:  Remains of a very special PT boat were discovered in the Harlem River in recent days.  Thx to Justin Zizes for passing that tidbit along.

Note:  This morning early while having coffee, I was planning a post for today and tomorrow.  Mistakenly, since coffee had not yet kicked in, I hit “post” instead of “schedule.”  Oops!  Well, enjoy these two posts, this and the Weddell Sea one.

These are interesting graphics.

I know of three boats called Tugnacious, but only one currently in NY waters just outside the sixth boro.  The other two are in Maine and the Chesapeake.

 

This is the only one with unique graphics, even on the jack.

The Nordhavn 7626 is a beauty.

Registry on the stern shows Oyster Bay NY.  Welcome home.

All photos, WVD, who is inspired to start a poem like “Whose yacht this is I think I know, His boats bear new names though, ” . . . like Caitlin Ann and Siberian and Greenland . . ..    Previous Nordhavns on this blog can be found here, although this is the first 7626.

For more photos of Tugnacious, not mine, click here.

 

 

Coming in past the obsolete and almost-development-obscured Coney Island parachute jump, it’s a science ship.

R & R . . . that stands for “research and recreation.”  Ocean Researcher has worked in the area for over a year, but she’s still an unusual vessel for the sixth boro.  And the small craft below . . . that IS my dream boat, a Grover 26.  Believe it or not, a version of that crossed the Atlantic back in the 1980s, with crew and builder from Freeport NY.

Ocean Researcher has been mapping the sea bed over in the area where the Atlantic City wind farm will be planted.

The Grover towing a tender.  Last year around this time I was contemplating getting a Grover 26.  My reservation . .   you can’t have too many toys.

I’m not sure why OR gets escorted in each time, given that it likely has some fine maneuvering tools and skills.

Ah . . . the Grover, it calls to me.  Maybe I can lease one for a summer and make a long trip.  I’m baring my soul here.

Gardline operates this vessel.  I saw one person on deck;  I wonder how many work aboard.

sigh . . .

With all the exotic bathymetric vessels calling in the sixth boro, I wonder how long it’ll be before pre-assembled modules will begin appearing.

All photos . . . WVD, who invites you to e-join me on Tuesday, for a synchronous or asynchronous Erie Canal tour.

The winter fishing boats are gone, likely fishing elsewhere and

replaced by these minimalist

machines.  There must be good fish to be had by the Staten Island side of the VZ Bridge.  They’re around in fall also.

Otherwise, like leaves on the trees and warm temperatures, they emerge.

 

And finally, in spite of all the other covid-19 changes,

snow birds are arriving.

This is a fishing machine,

but this larger boat, Poco Loco, came in the other day, with two days and four hours from Virginia Beach.  Anyone know who the manufacturer is?

Ditto this sportfish, it arrived at the Narrows from Cape May in four hours!

I believe I’m seeing fewer recreational boats like this and they’re arriving later than usual, and if they plan to get to the Great Lakes via the Erie Canal, that won’t be open for a while yet, as winter maintenance has mostly been stopped since mid-March.

Meanwhile, going in the other direction, you might recall seeing this boat on this blog before here . .  scroll.  Lil Diamond III, previously based along the NYS Thruway and doing tours for Erie Canal Cruises out of Herkimer NY, she’s been sold out of the Canal and is heading to a new life with Poseidon Ferry in Miami.  Here Kevin Oldenburg caught her headed south in front of Poughkeepsie being overtaken by a menacing cloud, and

here I caught her yesterday about to leave the sixth boro for a place fluidly connected.

Bon voyage, Lil Diamond III. previously big sister of Lil Diamond II,  as you buck the trend, heading south as a sunbird and meeting all the northbound snowbirds.  More photos from and of Lil Diamond III coming soon, I hope.

All photos, except Kevin’s, by WVD.

 

 

Lyons NY has the one of the best canal ambassador team  I know*. When summer yachts come through, the welcoming committee stop by.  And some interesting boats visit Lyons.  Take Farallone, from yesterday’s post.  By the way, if you’ve not read the additional info on Farallone I added in the comments section, check it out.

Since this sign, propped up beside the wooden tender over the engine is a bit hard to read, let me highlight some of the info:  12 identical Q-boats built for the War Department, second oldest Luders boat in existence (I wonder what’s the oldest.), was personal  launch of two Quartermaster Generals of the US, moved to the west for transport to and from Alcatraz, served as a salmon sport fish boat,  and then after a move back east  has traveled 10,000 in the Gulf of Mexico and the East Coast in the past 25 or so years.

Ahoy, Jon.   The owner of the boat back then and maybe still is catboat Jon, a specialist in wooden buckets.

While Farallone was in Lyons, Churchill moved Lois McClure through town as well.

Broadsword also stopped in Lyons, making her one of not that many yachts to have transited the Pacific, the Panama Canal, and the Erie Canal.

That’s lock E-27 in the distance, and Broadsword was headed west,

in the bottom of 27 and

out the top.

All photos, thanks to Bob Stopper in Lyons NY.

*Let me clarify the first sentence.  Many canal towns have ambassadors who are very knowledgeable about the local area.  I’ve found such folks happy to share the insights and assist with problem solving.  Once I stopped at a canal town and was welcomed by the mayor who made sure we had a pleasant stay.  I know the folks in Lyons more than I know most towns because I grew up near there.

 

 

This post is devoted to boats I’ve seen, certainly been intrigued by, and then . . . failed to follow.  The 60′ Farallone, built by Luders for the US government in 1918,  certainly fits that description.  The only time I saw it back in 2017, at 99 years well maintained,  it was for sale, but the “for sale” notice is still up here, and it says nothing about whether it’s been sold. When i googled it again today, I discovered that my friend Tim Hetrick took photos of it six years ago, and includes a detailed account of her life hereFarallone, where are you?

Both of the next boats I saw only once . . . May 2018, the day the Canal opened for the 100th season.  Troll hailed, or hails,  from Elburg NL.  She’s 58′ aluminum trawler and here are almost 100 photos of her with all the specs.  If you saw it, you’d recall, especially with that name and the orange paint.

Broadsword is the third vessel, and although it was westbound on the Erie Canal, she is now on the IJsselmeer in the Netherlands.  If you saw this 57′ yacht that crosses oceans, you’d remember it.  For lots of pics and info on the Finnish designer who has lived in Maine, click here. For more on Broadsword and sister vessel Koti, click here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, Farallone was below lock E-2 and Troll and Broadsword upbound at the top of the same lock.

And as long as I have the Covid-19 ankle bracelet keeping me at my desk, there’ll be more Erie Canal posts very soon.

Call this Something Different 21 followup, four and a half years on.  From that October 2015 post, I’d say art deco tug meet art deco yacht, built in 1941 by Palmer Scott in Fairhaven MA as a prototype for Revere Copper and Brass Inc.  Hence the name Revere.  I’d first thought it was named for the city.

And why the title?  Because this morning when following link to link, I arrived at this article by Krista Karlson about an exhibit I’d missed.   Sorry, Mystic, and now more sorry.

It turns out there was a Revere plant right beside Palmer Scott’s boatyard, if I read the last page here correctly.  Timing may have stifled follow up to the project, and after the war, other boat building materials were used.  But what became of this all metal, welded Cupro-nickel vessel?  Have Revere thought of manufacturing these?

I’d love to know more about the travels of Revere, which in the photo above appears to be headed downstream in the North River.

Related:  Last year I posted a photo of a mystery vessel I referred to as a boat/rat rod here.  I see some similar lines.

But first, what can you tell me about the tree directly below?

Now to “hoops” and maybe I should say “Höegh hoops . . .”

Here’s the aft most one, and

the court extends forward from there to this one.

See it?  I wished I’d been on the Bayonne Bridge walkway to look down on it.

JRT assisted and maybe delivered a ref?

 

JRT, 88.7′, is only slightly less long than the court, if it’s a standard NBA 94′ x 50′.

Possibly much more basketball goes on shipboard unbeknownst to anyone photographing as I was, played by seafarers constantly on the move.  I took this photo of basketball in the hold of a bulk carrier from a FB group called Seaman Online, which I’ve been following for a while.

All photos but the last one by Will Van Dorp.

Previous “hoops” post can be found here.

And finally . . .  this would have fit better in yesterday’s post, but . . . a reader in New Zealand sent the top photo along as a NZ “christmas tree”.

He writes:  “The New Zealand Christmas icon is the pohutukawa tree which has scarlet blossoms in December. [Remember it’s the southern hemisphere’s summer.]   It is often called the New Zealand Christmas Tree. It is a coastal variety and is often seen on cliff edges and spreading shade over sandy beaches.  The crooks of the branches were also used for the framing and knees of wooden boats.”

Thx, Denis and Judy.  More on a Kiwi Christmas here.

Let’s start with a boat I’d imagined had to be fiberglass, but no . . .

it’s a wooden 1959 Century Coronado.

She’s got looks and speed.

Steaming in front of Bonnie Castle . . . that has to be a Steelcraft, like this one on the blog last year.

This one I saw only on a trailer . . .  but 224 mph!!!

And these . . .  they almost completely blocked the Erie Canal channel at Sylvan Beach.

And how’s this for two Corbin 39 pilothouse sailboats . . .

Does anyone have experience with this model?

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is still gallivanting in foreign waters . . .

Now two more, one from me and another from an inquiring mind.

A above is mine, and B below is from Neil.  And the question is . . . are both these schooner rigs?

All photos except the last one by Will Van Dorp.

CB, you might recall, is “Chicago bound,” and we have now arrived, lingered, and turned back.  In a few days, another series will start, keyed to that journey.

Below . . .I guess we could have a contest to “name that boat or situation below.”

Then there’s Jim Ratcliffe‘s Hamilton I . . . 17 crew for 12 passengers and the smaller of his yachts.

Summer is winding down also, so this post is mostly devoted to recreational boats.  Sweet Evelyn offers an interesting niche not occupied in NYC.

Skyline Queen gets the prize for unusual paint job.

The small USCG boats train throwing a monkey’s fist.

A charming Chris Craft Sea Skiff comes and

goes.

Kayaks go out to surround Big Eagle, 

and Lacey Kay heads down bound from Detroit.

Happy Labor Day weekend if you’re not laboring.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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