You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘recreation’ category.

Here are previous posts in this series.

See the guy paddling along on the recreational board  . . . ?

Now you barely can on a blown-up portion of the same photo.

Here I zoom in . . .

but to the naked eye, he is invisible.

I’m not opposed to the concept of enjoying all manner of craft,

but safety is an issue.  On that subject, is that PFD around his hips!!?

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who prays for safety.

Meanwhile, PQ writes more on this from the Jersey side of the river:

Ariadne has been part of the view for a week from my place across from 79th Street on the Jersey side. At night it lights up like a Christmas tree. I followed the initial cable laying in 2012 by the Italian vessel, some photos of the jubilant construction back then can be found here.

A repair was attempted in 2016 when the cable cooling system sprung a leak at the north end. The power has been since switched off; when on it may or may not be used for full-time transmission, there were early reports that it was only for spare with the idea for it originating way back in the Great Blackouts.

Ariadne appears to be laying a complete new set of three cables, the guys at the camp onshore south of Edgewater Commons may have been told not to talk about it as the original cable cost a ton of money (nearly $1 billion including the onshore parts at each end) and these repairs do not come cheap. The company (Hudson Transmission Partners) was reportedly under financial and legal strain in 2016.

Ariadne, built 2008 in Norway, was named the Viking Poseidon prior to March of this year when the Norwegian company which used it for wind generator farms had to sell it for financial reasons and a Cyprus company now owns and operates it now – and has repainted the tan parts white.

The cable heads west through a disused train tunnel you can easily see from River Road across from Edgewater Commons and surfaces in a graveyard; there have been claims it is haunted (really). When NJ Transit built the trolley system from Bayonne they offered to extend the line to and through that tunnel if the towns would help but it was beyond their means, so the trolley heads under West New York.”

Again, thanks much to PQ for this input.

 

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To me, this is a water craft built with craftsmanship and sailed with care.

 

The blue boat . . . well, I just hope the paddler is not wearing headphones.

Here’s another hand-crafted wooden boat.

 

Here?    Well, kayaks are fun.   I used to spend many hours in an earlier version of these surfing New Hampshire coastal waves, but I wonder about using them here.  The positive is the discovery possible in human-powered and small scale boats.

Here’s a craftsman of small craft I’d like to find more about, Ralph Frese.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

GWA is “going west again,” and here we start at about 130′ above sea level.  We’ve just passed the road sign included in a post here in 2006. Ahead of us is lock E-2, the beginning of the flight of five, located in the town of Waterford.

Above E-3, my former vessel waits, along with Chancellor. Those two boats alone have a combined total life of 196 years between them.   In the foreground is the business end of a cutter suction dredge.

Recreation boats come from everywhere.

Beyond the guard gate atop E-6 is Grand Erie, who also came from away, the Ohio River in her case.

Locals know how to enjoy the 200-year-old waterway.

Below E-11, we get a green light in the early morning drizzle.

Squeezing a 183′ x 39′ vessel through the locks involves a skilled crew and vigilant lock master.

Drivers on the Thruway at this point are 42 miles from Albany, 190 from NYC.

At E-15, still in the drizzle, a Florida boat —Sharon Ann–waits as we lock through.

Above E-16, the 90-year-old Governor Cleveland attends dredge pipes, maintenance dredging being ongoing.  Yes, the canal needs maintenance, and so does the Thruway, any street, RR tracks and infrastructure, my car, my body . . . .

A boxer takes its human for a run . . .

More guard gates–width is 55′–to squeeze through.

Lords of the air watch all along the waterway.

At E-17 we share a lock with Tender #5.

Since we tie off above E-18, Lil Diamond II has to maneuver around.

An SPS lands a crew on the bank for preventative maintenance … keeping dead trees from falling into the water and jamming lock gates.

More recreational boats from far-off ports.

More maintenance above E-19, this time with dragon dredge and the electric tender . .  . #4.

Reinforcement of the canal walls is a canal priority this year.

 

I always imagine the mythical Utica lies beyond the berm marked by the open tower. Central NY was once included in the “military tract,” land distributed to Revolutionary War veterans.

Above lock E-20, we are at the high point of this portion of the Erie Canal,

and Rome was the original high point/ portage in the Mohawk portion of the waterways that pre-date Europeans settlement of North america.

We are now 456′ above sea level, where we’ll pick up the journey tomorrow.

All photos by and any errors attributable to Will Van Dorp.

 

Name this vessel?  Right there is the name.  Answer at end of the post.

I’d love to see the interior, as it might be as stark as the lines.

This is severe, almost military, but I like it.

This to is excess with an excessive name . . . Vibrant Curiosity, which

happens to be the slogan of the owner’s company.  Here are the particulars of the vessel built in Alblasserdam as was this vessel seen in this blog before completion.

All these photos I took on Sunday a high summer day for large yachts.  What might you call this one?

Podium.  What?  Yup that’s the name.  In spite of the too-analytical name, the manufacturer–Lürssen–has a long and interesting history.    And if I had the means and the need for a Lurssen I’d go for the spaceman’s boat here.

Over in the Hudson, I spotted this yacht with the “name” on the bow as an abbreviation for

Cantina,  built in Brazil.

And the name of the top boat here is “water,”  a quite good name for anything that floats.  Check out the kanji here.  Japanese is pronounced as “mizu,” and I’m not sure how Mandarin would be pronounced. Here’s an article with info on a feature I missed . . . a feature I’ve seen on ships in the harbor, since crews of no matter what vessel need exercise on the water.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp, who’s posted on similar yachts here and (more modestly) here.

OK, one more, a photo I took in October 2008, an expedition trawler over in Long Island City and said to have belonged to Björk Guðmundsdóttir.  I wonder if she still owns it.

 

 

 

The sixth boro–just like those other ones–is a crossroads.  In just a short span of time,  boats from Texas (note the Great Loop pennant on the bow)  and

Quebec pass . . . and they’re soon out of sight and gone.  But occasionally,

boats pass through, singly or in twos, and

you can follow their journey, as is the case with TwoTugsTravelin’     aka Sally W and Salty Paws,  who  hope to do the miniloop and be back through NYC in mid July, by way of the Canal, Lake Ontario, Rideau Canal by June 19, Ottawa River by the 28th, and the Richelieu by July 3.  And then in Maine waters

Will Van Dorp August 2015

by early August, by which time I hope the sun’s out.  Happy traveling’…

Thanks to Glenn Raymo for the two photos directly above.

The others by Will Van Dorp, who invites any bloggers traveling interesting waterways this summer to get in touch.  Here’s a cruiser going up the Pacific side of Central America.

 

This follows on my previous balls and bulls posts.  If you read this closely, you’ll have a sense of my favorite team, this year or in all the previous years.

Ball 1,

ball

 

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This is Ball 4.

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So I walk.  Super!  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I shouldn’t be surprised to find pricey boats in a city like NYC, but I still am.  I took the first two photos here in Chelsea Piers, and I imagined their understated elegant lines meant they were affordable.  Well, maybe they are easily affordable by the incoming executive branch standards, but for most folks, not so much.  Look them up . . . Van Dutch boats.

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I also shouldn’t be surprised how fast some boats travel on the Hudson, but this one flew past at

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least 35 knots, and it wasn’t small.  I’ve no idea who the manufacturer is.

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Traveling in the canal makes for a slower pace, with people going for the distance, like

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Pioche.  They must know about some new navigation canal infrastructure plans I’m not privy to.  And I wonder who they hope to meet in Pioche.

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If I bought another cruising boat, I’d want something like this . . .

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here upbound the St Lawrence.  I’m not positive it’s a pleasure boat, but PCF does not mean patrol craft, fast.  It could be Provincial C___  for Fisheries?

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I’m not sure what this is, besides a boat.  Anyone know the story?  She was up north of the Scarano barns in Albany.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

She’s here–to the right–it’s Manhattan II, Classic Harbor Line’s latest tour boat in the sixth boro.  The Manhattans operate parts of three seasons.

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And along the same stretch of dock, earlier this year was Lady May, a 150′ Feadship.  Last year in Netherlands, I kayaked with a Feadship employee who loved building these vessels but loved kayaking the canals there even more.

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Also, back in August I espied Knickerbocker on the Sound, so I came down to North Cove to see her close up.

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I’m not sure the size of her crew. Anyone know?  And where does one apply?

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Here’s more of the Scarano sixth boro fleet.

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Here’s a Robert Frank article inside a recent edition of the NYTimes about a 274′ Feadship yacht with a crew of 26 and a hybrid power plant capable of 18 knots.

Click here and here for some other megayachts.  Here’s a Feadship heading out to sea.

 

A Nordhavn 62 . . .  ??  exiting the Erie Canal last weekend.  Professional delivery crew?

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It was interesting that something they saw on the bulkhead in Waterford prompted them to do a 180 and try to squeeze onto the bulkhead.  Was it thoughts of dining on sausage and onions washed down with a Keegan Ale?  Port of registry here–Port Colbourne–marks the southern point of the Welland Canal.

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At 73′ Sea Fox pulled into Morris Canal recently.

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Sutton Island lies just south of Acadia National Park.

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Two-Can is a repurposed North Sea fishing trawler . . . at near 90′ and built in Urk in 1968.

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I took the photo below of Wanderbird in May 2013, and I don’t know if it’s still for sale, but when I visited Belfast recently there was another

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and newer Wanderbird in the yard.  I wonder what the story is, and where the black-hulled version now floats.

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Top Hat  . . . with its own Mount Desert origins . . .  I’m not sure how much it’d cost,  but it looks like a million dollars.

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And bringing this back to the sixth boro . . . Jamaica Bay, an unlikely name it seems, came in the Narrows on Friday.

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This 200′ yacht was built in Rendsburg along the Kiel Canal in 2010.

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Closing shot . . .  Makulu heading for the sound via the East River this week.  In the late 90s and early 00s this ketch sailed around the world at least three times as an educational project.  It appears now she’s for sale or sold.  ??

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Personal disclosure:  I used to enjoy playing football, but I’ve never watched a Super Bowl game.  I certainly have no feelings at all about any team, any sport.  But with all this talk of seahawks and broncos on ground hog day, I’m not oblivious: ground pork meatballs will go in my lunch stew.  This morning over coffee I decided to look up the history of the two teams soon to engage in New Jersey.  So the first owner of the broncos originally (prior to 1960) had a team called the bears.   And one of the two first investors in the seahawks was a Ned Skinner, scion of the Skinner & Eddy shipyard in Seattle and himself last owner/operator of the Alaska Steamship Company.

Anyhow . . . enjoy this digressive post, one that zags and zigs through a number of critters–like Stolt Bobcat–I’ve seen in the past year, as

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well as this unusual logo on the side of a junked truck,

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first signs of winter on the sixth boro,

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my favorite fishing bird,

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a quite effective gull,

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my company atop a mountain in January River,

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disciples of a certain waterborne tagger along the KVK,

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the only good rat I’ve seen in a while over at Sal Polisi’s shop near South Street Seaport,

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a beached shark, and finally

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some docked rays struggling in the light of morning sun’s rays over by Owl’s Head.  And speaking of rays and ground hog . . .

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I’m guessing Staten Island and Punxsutawney pick on ground hogs just because there are no convenient bears or badgers around to consult about winter weather.

Last critter word here, see a sea hawk and a bronco go toe-to-toe here.

Here was an earlier critter post.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who’s now off to grind the pork.

Ooops!  here’s one more critter link . . . from gCaptain, an inside look at a cattle/livestock carrier.

And another loops!  Read this NJstarledger article about birds here.

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