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Here are the previous posts in this series.  Here’s the complete A. de Saint-Exupery quote:  “If you want to build a ship [crew a ship], don’t drum up the men to gather wood, divide the work , and give orders. Instead, teach them to yearn for the vast and endless sea.”

I was thrilled to see Sea Dart II this past weekend, and then not far behind

Sea Horse!!

I was fortunate to see them;  I know the scouts know how fortunate they are to have this opportunity.  Sail on!

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp.

 

I caught this T-boat back two years ago, and here she is again.  I’ve posted on this vessel before, (scroll) here and here. It’s the 1953 Sea Dart II, originally T-513.

She’s become a sign of spring for me.

A good old boat like this to learn marketable skills would have been heaven-sent for me as a kid.

 

Fly your flags high, Scouts.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I have more Saint Lawrence posts, but with a chrononautical weekend behind us, let me digress and report.  The mood for the first ship was set by the weather;  see what the mist did to my favorite downtown building–70 Pine.  Click here and be treated to a slideshow of views through time of boro Manhattan’s  tall observation cliffs, past present and future.

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Looking eastbound up the East River, I saw her waiting, as

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first one of her entourage arrived and

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and then another.

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The term “haze gray” was certainly demonstrated yesterday,

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as was the vintage of this Liberty ship headed to sea, for a cruise.

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Even the Higgins T-boat in the distance is a whole decade closer to the present–in inception– than Brown, although  yesterday all crowded into 2016.

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It was a moving sight,

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which I beheld,

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only slightly regretting I was not aboard.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Whenever I see something new, it feels like a sunny day, no matter what the meteorologist calls it.  Like this day last week, I was hunkering down keeping these spots from messing with my lens . . .

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It took some seconds to conclude I’d seen this vessel before, (scroll) here and here. It’s the 1953 Sea Dart II, originally T-513.

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I’d love to see her Buda engine, at least not that I know the engine, although my father’s old Allis Chalmers tractors might have had one.

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Anyhow, hat’s off Troop 228.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes to be seeing sea darts of another sort today.

T-boats are up today, and seeing some in Baltimore led me into the archives.  Click here for a short history of Carina, a T-boat I saw in Clayton NY but never got a good photo of.   Here’s a database of the existing ones, although the info looks dated. Here’s another article on T-boats and Sea Scouts.

Enjoy.  Higgins hull #424 from 1952.

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taken in January 2011

Higgins hull 434 from 1952

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taken in September 2015

Higgins hull 504 from 1953

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taken in September 2015

Higgins hull 513 from 1953

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taken in July 2014

same boat . . . stern

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All photos taken by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated but fascinating to me:  the October 2015 National Geographic article on river transport on the Congo River in the DRC.  The article describes conditions not unlike those I encountered on my travels on the River in 1973 and 1974.  Click here for a post I did about that time.

Totally related:  Here’s the book to read on Higgins.

 

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