You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Michael Miller’ tag.

Cormorant and I talk sometime; yes, the one on the piling and not the former DEP boat.  Anyhow, cormorant prompted me to get these three photos.

So, evidence here is that I did.  A red . . . Freightliner Summit Hauler was preparing to tow an odd bundle off M8001 barge held in place by Michael Miller.  Might those be bundled barricades?  Any idea where this post is going?

Then another Hauler backed onto the barge to tow off another oddly loaded trailer. This was Monday, I believe.

Then last night, I was messaging with some friends and learned about this . . .  to the right side of this photo . . . a building on Governors Island.  Know it?

It appears that this week, in addition to being UN Week, is New York’s leg of a global show jumper tour, and if not the horses, then certainly all the bleachers and everything else arrives on the island . . .  by barge.  I’m not knocking anything in this post, but the fact that Governors Island hosts such an event boggles my mind, although you’d think that after living in NYC for 20 years now, nothing would surprise me.  Buffalo Bill Wild West Show, it’s not, and Staten Island hosted those horses over 130 years ago!

Three top photos mine, WVD.  Previous Governors island posts can be seen here. Hat tip to cormorant.

Millers Launch pushes a lot of interesting cargo around the harbor, like this one (scroll) from July 2014, this one I missed in September 2018, and the five boros sometimes spill out onto the sixth boro with their show business pursuits.  And consumer side of show business, I think this 2020 concept was nixed because of Covid?

The previous 70 “something different” posts can be seen here.  Not included is the 2006 “floating island.”  Recall any other odd barges in the sixth boro?

Here was the first post in this series, but Wednesday I caught the crane again, this time being handled by a regular in the boro as well as a newcomer named Brinn Courtney, who appeared here once before as Patricia Winslow

Thinking the better shot would be with Manhattan as background, we opted for the NY side,

but as we passed on our way to another job, we noticed the green stack on the starboard side of the tow.  I’d not seen that earlier and had not taken time to look at AIS.

At first I thought Charles James, but her red paint has been covered over a few years ago, so i finally looked at AIS and saw

it was Brinn Courtney, a new-to-Stasinos boat. 

I would have taken more of Brinn Courtney, but we were already late for a rendezvous.  

Welcome to the boro, Brinn Courtney.  She appeared here once about eight years ago as Patricia Winslow.

All photos on the fly, WVD. Thanks to the New York Media Boat for conveyance.

Note:  By this time tomorrow, I will be out of the boro and the robots in tugster tower will again have their virtual fingers and hands on the controls.  I’ve no idea how long I’ll be away on this gallivant, nor what the WiFi situation will be.  Go, robots!

 

Bet you can guess where that line leads from the bow of Kirby Moran?

Here you go.

Jordan Rose has been tied up in Bayonne for a while, but

Gregg McAllister passes her on the way to an assist.

Michael Miller is one of the venerable tugs of the sixth boro,

having worked here since the mid-1960s.

Cape Fear has been here for a few years, although I’ve not yet seen

her two sisters, Cape May and Cape Henry. 

Ava M. is one of the workhorses, certainly. 

Does anyone know when and if Capt. Brian A. will return to service here?

Kimberly Turecamo has worked the harbor consistently for going-on 30 years.

Here she heads into an orange sherbet dawn.

All photos in the past week, WVD., who has more Canal Society archival photos coming but some contemporary posts demonstrate my temporary anchor.  Also coming up, a photographer high above Hell Gate has shared a new trove of photos from a perspective I’ve missed.  Many thanks for your continued interest.

It’s been a while since Lilac appeared here, but this illusion of the steamer under way on her own power was thrilling.  I’m not adept enough at photo manipulation to add the right measure of smoke from her stack.  

And yes, the prime mover here is Michael Miller, with Susan nearby as well.  .

Like a vessel steaming in from another era,

 

it was great to see Lilac under way. 

All photos, WVD, who is unaware of the length of her duration at Caddells.

Photos of her engine can be seen here.

Weeks 533 has credibility: she lifted the USAir Flight 1549 Airbus A320 out of the Hudson back almost 11 years ago and more.  So the other day when I was on my way to “yon” and saw her “hither” and she was working with Susan Miller, I decided to linger and inquire.

That’s when I noticed the pier 11 Wall Street float was partially submerged, and a heavy lift crew was aboard securing cables.

Besides that crew, one tug and Susan Miller, even the Green Lady was craning her neck overtop the ferry and over in my direction, paying attention.

 

When I managed to board a conveyance and get to the middle of the East River . . .

I saw there were actually four tugs involved,  two Dann tugs and another Miller tug.

Once the landing barge was lifted over the spuds and large pumps installed–I think that’s what I saw–Susan Miller whisked the barge away to be repaired, rehabbed.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who calls this another feat for Weeks 533.

Lots more tugster cranes here.

Frances heads out to earn some money on a rainy yesterday morning.  I’ve no idea what that red glow behind the Statue is.

Lincoln Sea has worked on both coasts since I’ve been doing this blog, and like Frances, has kept the same name.  Click here to see her in my second ever blog post . . . 2006.

Michael Miller here moves equipment to and from islands in the boro’s archipelago.  I first saw this vessel as Stapleton Service.

Annie G II goes way back on this blog too.  Recently she’s been doing a job over west of the Staten Island Ferry racks, a job she was the perfect size for.   She’s a WGI tug.

Jane A. Bouchard was out along the east side of Staten Island, passing the old US Marine Hospital.  See it here if you scroll way through.

Ellen McAllister was heading out for a call.  I likely first posted a photo of her here.

In that photo earlier, Jane was headed to meet up with Evening Star and her barge.

James E. Brown and Thomas J. Brown tag teamed car float NYNJR 200, the newest and largest car float in the sixth boro.

Ditto, CMT Pike and Helen Laraway meet up on a set of scows.

And to close this out, it’s Austin Reinauer, Boston-bound in the rain.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I walked along the Hudson and past the Vessel the other day because it was flat and scenic.   I also wanted to see what progress was happening at Pier 55, aka on Diller Island.

Beneath, from small boats  .  . . these workers attended to several of the 132 pots that make up the island.

Michael Miller stood by Weeks 526, as

at this moment did  Shawn Miller.

 

Meanwhile, coming upriver was another Weeks crane, the 533,  with Susan Miller on port bow and

Elizabeth supplying power.

 

 

At a certain moment, Shawn departed the 526 and headed over to the Weeks 533

to assist.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who recently saw Weeks and Miller tugs working on 533 here.

 

 

[Note:  investigation of the Christmas pirate break-in is ongoing at Tugster Tower.  Culprits once located and questioned may face a job offer. ]

Weeks 533, the one that lifted Sully’s plane out of the Hudson, was moving up to either Port Elizabeth or Newark, using a three-tug configuration.

What impressed me was the lean-in, seen here by Michael Miller and

relayed by Catherine.

 

Causing this huge box-in-the-water to turn to starboard takes a lot of persuasion.

Thomas Weeks, likely providing the bulk of the forward movement, stays largely even keeled.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose done more posts here featuring this crane.

 

Traffic on the East River captivates, in part, because of the context, the vertical density shrinks even large vessels, or flotillas like this.

Weeks 531, I’m thinking, must be fairly new, not only because I’ve seen her only in 2018, but more so because she doesn’t show up on the Weeks crane pages.  For a 500-ton lift capacity crane, she’s strangely absent online.

Unlike most crane barges that I’ve seen, she has a prominent superstructure.

When she was “west” bound the other day, Katherine was out front, tailed by

Susan and Michael (ex-Freddie K) Miller.

Back in January I caught the next two photos of Weeks 531 headed directly from the AK into Newark Bay.   At first view, I assumed Weeks had a huge new tug.

That’s Bergen Point between the equipment and my lens.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  Can anyone fill in more info on the 531?

Previous posts featuring Weeks equipment can be found here with the Shuttle Enterprise and here with USAirways Flight 1549, in both cases involving Weeks 533, another 500-ton capacity crane.

Sometimes posts just write themselves, like this one.  After seeing someone else post a photo of a large tugboat named Abundance and a barge named Stymie, I had to follow suit.  I tried unsuccessfully to find what or where Densa is.

Arctic Breeze as a spring morning dawns?

Ah . . . the good lord DOES have a village named for him upstate along the Erie Canal . . . , a village that’s also associated with other noteworthy folks.

Here I have a serious question . . .  is there a seacoast town anywhere where high school girls vie for this title as they do for such titles as Miss Apple Blossom?  Click here for some other crazy contests . . .

Oops . . I shot the photo too early.  Here’s a closer up view of what Michael Miller is pushing.

And if there’s a Suez Canal in the Kill Van Kull, might there be a Kill Van Kull in the Suez Canal?

And finally . . . do you remember Roaring Bull?  Well, they are a struggling ferry operation over Susquehanna, great people with a long history.  Maybe you can contribute some of your tax refund now and take a ride on the ferry later this summer.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,568 other followers
If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Documentary "Graves of Arthur Kill" is AVAILABLE again here.Click here to buy now!

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

December 2022
M T W T F S S
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031