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Is this a miniature replica of a tugboat posed beside a green wall?

Not really.  But besides ULCVs like Thalassa Pistis (sea of faith?), even 100′ x 40′ tugboats seem to shrink.

 

Enlarge this photo and you’ll see the folks here heading out to fish implausibly turn their backs to the huge ship not that far away.

She’s has capacity of just under 14,000 teu, 

although she appears to have fewer than that aboard.

The 106′ x 32′ Brendan Turecamo, like the other tugs, appears to be shrunk.

She arrived here from Savannah and Colon Panama before that;  as of dawn Saturday, she’s still in port here. 

All photos, WVD.

 

Taking photos in the sixth boro is a real luxury, providing a wealth of subjects.  Ava M. was escorting a Maersk ship in, and I’ll post about that later.  For now let’s focus on the CMA CGM box ship.

Colomb dates from 2009, but this was my first time to catch her in the boro.  She’s one of five Explorer-class 13,830 teu boats.  Previously, I’ve posted photos of Vespucci and Corte Real, leaving Lapérouse and Magellan.  But there’s some unusual about Colomb, first of the series.  I’ll let you ponder that.

Given her dimensions of 1199′ x 168′, profile photos of her aren’t that interesting, although

if you zoom out a bit to catch the west end of the VZ bridge and the waning snow moon . . .  it helps a bit, maybe.

Powering her, at that time to Norfolk, is a single Wärtsilä-Hyundai 14RT-flex96C generating107,390 hp!

And the unusual feature?

All photos, WVD, who was surprised that she carries passengers!  Read more here, although I’m not sure this info is up to date.

Talos.  Know the reference?  I didn’t but will share the response at the end of this post.  It’s entirely appropriate for the very automated  and largest in physical size class of container ships to call in the sixth boro, 1211′ loa.  In fact, another ship of the class is recognized as being (in 2019) as the largest vessel to pass through the new Panama Canal locks.  That ULCV, Triton, has been in the sixth boro several times, once just recently, and I’ve managed to miss it each time. The diminutive tug off the port quarter is Vane’s 95′ Susquehanna with a barge on the wire.

Entering the boro means passing the lighthouse on Norton’s Point, aka Seagate.

Another clue to the length of Talos comes by comparing it to the VZ Bridge tower, which rise up nearly 700′.

 

 

I’ve seen photos of Triton, and it has the same blotchy paint.  Anyone know why?

She headed west on the ConHook Range with four McAllister tugs, although none of a tether.

I chose not to follow her through the KVK, so maybe Capt. Brian A. got on the tether here.

Note the size of ferry JFK alongside Talos. JFK has a loa of 277′.

Talos here heads for Port Elizabeth;  over beynd her is Al Qibla, another ULCV.

All photos, WVD, who offers this link on the five Triton-class boats.

Engine here is the AN Diesel & Turbo B&W 11S90ME-C9&10.

Talos, a robot, . .  . has quite the legacy, which you can learn here.  He was finally defeated by the guiles of MedeaHere‘s the contemporary, non-marine Talos.

Also arriving in port before dawn this morning is the CMA CGM 15000 ULCV I’ve not yet seen, CMA CGM Panama.

 

I took these photos of ONE Apus a year and a half ago while she first approached the sixth boro.  It was a calm and bright day.

This is what 14000 teu neatly stacked looks like.

For scale, see the crewman on the bow of JRT Moran as the messenger line hauls the heavy line up from JRT‘s winch.

The next two photos I took from a gCaptain article this morning, showing the first photos taken from land as ONE Apus limped into Kobe after encountering a storm that embroiled the Pacific Ocean. 

ONE Apus had been underway from Yantian China [near Hong Kong] to Long Beach CA USA when it encountered the storm 1800 nm NE of Hawaii*.  It returned westward to Kobe Japan for assessment.  From gCaptain’s Mike Schuler:  “The vessel is cautiously proceeding to the port of Kobe, Japan with an ETB of 1200LT on December 8, subject to all operations proceeding as planned,” the update said. “The priority remains on getting the ship and crew safely to port. Once berthed, it’s expected to take some time to offload the dislodged containers that remain on board. Then, a thorough assessment will be made on the exact number and type of containers that have been lost or damaged.”

To be followed up on.  All photos, except the last two from gCaptain, WVD.  Here‘s a story about a similar though smaller loss of containers.  Ans what happens to containers lost at sea?  That question and others you might imagine are answered here

*Might this have been the same storm, and its aftereffects?  A friend who works on the Bering Sea reports having been seasick for the first time in his life . . .

Not quite half a year ago, I caught Rose from the sunny side.  

This undifferentiated mass in the Ambrose Channel yesterday was quite impressive as well.

As a reference, the towers of the VZ Bridge towers in 693′.  The length of the tugboat in the foreground is just under 90′.

I’ve not pointed out Robbins Reef Light in a while, and that’s part of the Manhattan skyline beyond, also an undifferentiated mass in the morning fog.

The 13,500 teu vessel came off the ways at a Hudong-Zhanghua shipyard about two years ago.

She was assisted in by four tugboats.

 

Margaret, Jonathan C, Kirby, and Kimberly.

 

The three-mile strait called KVK, or the very Dutch name Kill van Kull, is hardly straight.

 

As she rounded Bergen Point, a trailer crossed over from Bayonne to Staten Island, harbinger of what will happen to whatever number of containers leave the ship in the next two days in Port Elizabeth.

All photos, WVD.

About two months ago, CMA CGM Brazil called in the sixth boro.  She’s one of four 15000 teu vessels, the largest ULCVs to date to call here.  Recently, the next one visited, CMA CGM Mexico.   Technically, her capacity is 15,128 teus.

I’ve stated this before:  a vessel this size makes the boro’s largest assist tugs look small.  In the photo below, notice that Brendan Turecamo‘s upright mast barely extends above the hull lettering.

If I heard the numbers right on the VHF, the ULCV had 42′ reaching toward the channel bed and just shy of 200′ reaching up toward the bridges, Bayonne and VZ.

Up close, she could be divided into the bow and bridge,

the midbody, and

the stern.

Note the small white fishing boat alongside just forward of the first tug.

All four Argentina-class ships are working;  the first to arrive in NYC was the last to come off the ways.  They were all built at Hyundai Samho Heavy Industry Shipyard, which would be a fascinating place to visit.

She stacks containers 20 across.   Compare that with 16 across as the largest I saw here 10 years ago.

When the assistance with the curves from Port Elizabeth to Con Hook is complete, all four tugs cast off and return to the base.

Here‘s more on the Hyundai shipyard.

All photos, WVD.

By the way, the engine here is MAN 11G90ME-C with scrubbers,  generating just over 92,000 horsepower.  I’d love to know more. 

I’ve seen this Explorer class CMA CGM once before, at least.  I’m not counting on CMA CGM Zheng He to call in the sixth boro, unfortunately.  If you don’t know the namesake of that ship, Admiral Zheng He, he’s someone to find more about. You can start here

It gives no consolation that CMA CGM Magellan, here in October, came and went unrecorded by my camera. 

If you don’t know much about the namesake of this ship, for example how many times he actually crossed the Atlantic and about which there is some controversy, click here.

What caught my attention most, though, was the patches of hoarfrost on the hull of the ship.  It should not be a surprise, because the same stuff coated my windshield yesterday morning. 

More patches are here.  But then, it was the stark distinction between the light/shadow on the tug, on JRT.

Then shadows appeared, burnt into the frozen hull.

See the docking pilot himself and the shadow?

See the pilot nearing the bottom of the ladder and reaching out for the deck hand?

Happy November, all, from WVD.

This is “restricted visibility,” and as you can imagine, lots of fog horn blasts were sounded.  An alternative explanation is that APL Dublin just folds herself into another dimension.  The ship was launched in 2012.

Believe it or not, the vessel below is also APL Dublin, photo taken about 10 minutes earlier in a less foggy area of the sixth boro.

On a much clearer day, Erato exchanges containers in Brooklyn’s container port.  As of this writing, Erato is making for Haiti.

Algoma Integrity discharges aggregates in Brooklyn.  She began life in 2009 as Gypsum IntegrityGypsum vessels used to frequent the North River earlier THIS century.

CPO Hamburg enters the port of NYNJ.  A 2009 vessel, she was previously called Seattle Express.  The CPO and Conti vessels are part of the Offen Group.

I expected Sealand Illinois to be long and sleek and Maersk blue, as she appears in older photos.  She dates from 2000.

And finally, ONE Marvel is right up there in the constellation of great names, but 

when she last arrived inbound, the fog dimmed even her magenta skin.

Outbound, let’s have a look at this ULCV,

YM Width, a Taiwan-built box ship from 2016.  She’s one of 26 W-class vessels operated by Yang Ming.  Also in the boro recently were YM Wellhead, YM Wind, and YM Warranty, and another W-class vessels you might recall is YM World.    

All photos, WVD.

 

 

When I started this blog, Evergreen presented itself in the sixth boro with their D class.  Then they added size and capacity with their L class.  Today for the first time,

I saw an F class, Ever Focus.  I can imagine subsequent ships called Faith, Fruitful, Frugal, Friendly . . .  really I’m just guessing.    Below, it appears more structure has been added to prevent losing containers overboard.

 

The superstructure seems much more compact, yielding space for a payload.

I’ve read this vessel has entered service in 2020; we’ve seen quite a number of brand-spanking boats arrive here this year, such as the Hyundai and Seaspan boats.

Someone more knowledgeable than me might explain why it appeared only one engine is operating.

BOLO . . . the next F class Evergreen boat.  The F class, though new, is by no means Evergreen’s largest.  They’ve already completed several of the G class:  Ever Golden, Ever Goods . . .  These come in a 20,000 teu and 1312′ x 194′ . . . .  There’s a lot of stuff being moved around the ocean, mostly in the direction of the “advanced” countries.

All photos, WVD.

How about a tale of the tape for the ones that have served NYC:  D class boats are Panamax:  964′ x 105′ and 4711 teu.  L class come in at 1099′ x 151′ and 8452 teu.  This F boat is 1096′ x 157′ but somehow  . . . 11850 teu.

Here are the previous 5 installments.

What’s this below?  Double click on it before continuing.

An ULCV named Peony

passed by a cloudy day recently and the water turned so blue

I could feel it.

Just the color was cooling, relaxing.

All photos, WVD, who for a moment heard the low throb of the diesel and felt this otherwise quiet, massive machine slide by.

 

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