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Not quite half a year ago, I caught Rose from the sunny side.  

This undifferentiated mass in the Ambrose Channel yesterday was quite impressive as well.

As a reference, the towers of the VZ Bridge towers in 693′.  The length of the tugboat in the foreground is just under 90′.

I’ve not pointed out Robbins Reef Light in a while, and that’s part of the Manhattan skyline beyond, also an undifferentiated mass in the morning fog.

The 13,500 teu vessel came off the ways at a Hudong-Zhanghua shipyard about two years ago.

She was assisted in by four tugboats.

 

Margaret, Jonathan C, Kirby, and Kimberly.

 

The three-mile strait called KVK, or the very Dutch name Kill van Kull, is hardly straight.

 

As she rounded Bergen Point, a trailer crossed over from Bayonne to Staten Island, harbinger of what will happen to whatever number of containers leave the ship in the next two days in Port Elizabeth.

All photos, WVD.

About two months ago, CMA CGM Brazil called in the sixth boro.  She’s one of four 15000 teu vessels, the largest ULCVs to date to call here.  Recently, the next one visited, CMA CGM Mexico.   Technically, her capacity is 15,128 teus.

I’ve stated this before:  a vessel this size makes the boro’s largest assist tugs look small.  In the photo below, notice that Brendan Turecamo‘s upright mast barely extends above the hull lettering.

If I heard the numbers right on the VHF, the ULCV had 42′ reaching toward the channel bed and just shy of 200′ reaching up toward the bridges, Bayonne and VZ.

Up close, she could be divided into the bow and bridge,

the midbody, and

the stern.

Note the small white fishing boat alongside just forward of the first tug.

All four Argentina-class ships are working;  the first to arrive in NYC was the last to come off the ways.  They were all built at Hyundai Samho Heavy Industry Shipyard, which would be a fascinating place to visit.

She stacks containers 20 across.   Compare that with 16 across as the largest I saw here 10 years ago.

When the assistance with the curves from Port Elizabeth to Con Hook is complete, all four tugs cast off and return to the base.

Here‘s more on the Hyundai shipyard.

All photos, WVD.

By the way, the engine here is MAN 11G90ME-C with scrubbers,  generating just over 92,000 horsepower.  I’d love to know more. 

I’ve seen this Explorer class CMA CGM once before, at least.  I’m not counting on CMA CGM Zheng He to call in the sixth boro, unfortunately.  If you don’t know the namesake of that ship, Admiral Zheng He, he’s someone to find more about. You can start here

It gives no consolation that CMA CGM Magellan, here in October, came and went unrecorded by my camera. 

If you don’t know much about the namesake of this ship, for example how many times he actually crossed the Atlantic and about which there is some controversy, click here.

What caught my attention most, though, was the patches of hoarfrost on the hull of the ship.  It should not be a surprise, because the same stuff coated my windshield yesterday morning. 

More patches are here.  But then, it was the stark distinction between the light/shadow on the tug, on JRT.

Then shadows appeared, burnt into the frozen hull.

See the docking pilot himself and the shadow?

See the pilot nearing the bottom of the ladder and reaching out for the deck hand?

Happy November, all, from WVD.

This is “restricted visibility,” and as you can imagine, lots of fog horn blasts were sounded.  An alternative explanation is that APL Dublin just folds herself into another dimension.  The ship was launched in 2012.

Believe it or not, the vessel below is also APL Dublin, photo taken about 10 minutes earlier in a less foggy area of the sixth boro.

On a much clearer day, Erato exchanges containers in Brooklyn’s container port.  As of this writing, Erato is making for Haiti.

Algoma Integrity discharges aggregates in Brooklyn.  She began life in 2009 as Gypsum IntegrityGypsum vessels used to frequent the North River earlier THIS century.

CPO Hamburg enters the port of NYNJ.  A 2009 vessel, she was previously called Seattle Express.  The CPO and Conti vessels are part of the Offen Group.

I expected Sealand Illinois to be long and sleek and Maersk blue, as she appears in older photos.  She dates from 2000.

And finally, ONE Marvel is right up there in the constellation of great names, but 

when she last arrived inbound, the fog dimmed even her magenta skin.

Outbound, let’s have a look at this ULCV,

YM Width, a Taiwan-built box ship from 2016.  She’s one of 26 W-class vessels operated by Yang Ming.  Also in the boro recently were YM Wellhead, YM Wind, and YM Warranty, and another W-class vessels you might recall is YM World.    

All photos, WVD.

 

 

When I started this blog, Evergreen presented itself in the sixth boro with their D class.  Then they added size and capacity with their L class.  Today for the first time,

I saw an F class, Ever Focus.  I can imagine subsequent ships called Faith, Fruitful, Frugal, Friendly . . .  really I’m just guessing.    Below, it appears more structure has been added to prevent losing containers overboard.

 

The superstructure seems much more compact, yielding space for a payload.

I’ve read this vessel has entered service in 2020; we’ve seen quite a number of brand-spanking boats arrive here this year, such as the Hyundai and Seaspan boats.

Someone more knowledgeable than me might explain why it appeared only one engine is operating.

BOLO . . . the next F class Evergreen boat.  The F class, though new, is by no means Evergreen’s largest.  They’ve already completed several of the G class:  Ever Golden, Ever Goods . . .  These come in a 20,000 teu and 1312′ x 194′ . . . .  There’s a lot of stuff being moved around the ocean, mostly in the direction of the “advanced” countries.

All photos, WVD.

How about a tale of the tape for the ones that have served NYC:  D class boats are Panamax:  964′ x 105′ and 4711 teu.  L class come in at 1099′ x 151′ and 8452 teu.  This F boat is 1096′ x 157′ but somehow  . . . 11850 teu.

Here are the previous 5 installments.

What’s this below?  Double click on it before continuing.

An ULCV named Peony

passed by a cloudy day recently and the water turned so blue

I could feel it.

Just the color was cooling, relaxing.

All photos, WVD, who for a moment heard the low throb of the diesel and felt this otherwise quiet, massive machine slide by.

 

I did not forget in the beginning of April about the 2020 calendar enhancement;  there were just too any things going on! So today I both catch up, and get ahead.  And according to my accounting robot, today I post for the 4,500th time.  Champagne is spilling all over my editor’s floor, but he’s not sharing.

YM World came in last April as Anthem of the Seas was departing.  If one keeps records with the goal of tracking change, few industries have changed as profoundly as the cruise industry has in the past year, and all that in the past two months.

Truly YM World, an ULCV,is huge.  But earlier this week, MSC Anna sailed under the Golden Gate, over 100′ longer, almost 40′ wider, giving her a total teu capacity of over 19k, compared with around 14k here.  That 5000 teu difference equals the total capacity of an average container ship serving the sixth boro 10 years ago.

 

The May calendar page features James D Moran nosing up against a pink magenta wall.

Here she comes in to meet off the starboard side.

Then she matches speed

and comes alongside to drop off the docking pilot.

All photos, WVD.

 

 

Tightrope?

 

This ULCV shows 17 containers across.

It’s a bit surprising to see a Moran 6000 on starboard bow, also on a “tight rope.”

YM Evolution . . . without counting the rows of containers, does it look less beamy?

It is  . . . 15 across.  By contrast, CMA CGM Amerigo Vespucci, the other day here, carries 20 across.

All photos, WVD.

 

As coronavirus spasms across the globe, affecting all aspects of public activity, container ship runs has been blanked.  But you would not guess so from the string of CMA CGM vessels that came in one sunny day last week.  La Traviata rounded the bend just before 1100.

The teu capacity of this 2006-built ship is said to be 8488 containers.

She was so light that the prop wash splashed froth to the surface.

Ten minutes later CMA CGM Thames appeared.

Thames carries 9200 containers, and was built in 2015.  I’ve never seen either Thames or La Traviata in the sixth boro, which does not mean they’ve not called here before.

 

A few hours later, a third CMA CGM vessel arrived . . . Amerigo Vespucci, one I had previously seen.

The 2010 Vespucci has capacity of 13,344 containers.  She one of the 1200′ vessels that now regularly call here.

That totals to 31,032 teu container capacity represented by a single fleet transiting inbound in less than a quarter of a day!  And to do some math here, that’s about 117 miles of containers stacked end to end, ie., the distance from the Staten Island St. George Terminal to the Delaware Memorial Bridge.

For some perspective, a Korean company will begin operating the largest teu vessels to date . . . 24,000 teu.

So like I said, last week I did not sense that container ship sailings were slowing, which does not mean they are not.

All photos, WVD.

Unrelated:  A new word for a wasteful and polluting practice is coming from pandemic  . . . they’re called ghost flights . . .  Here‘s more on why airlines choose to fly these almost empty planes.

I knew it was coming.  VHF chatter alluded to it.  AIS showed it.  And for going on 10 minutes I’d heard it . . . sound, at intervals of not more than two minutes, a prolonged blast, of which I’d heard no fewer than five . . .

Then in addition to the chest-penetrating blasts, I became aware of a low rpm throbbing. When the bow first appeared, it came with no hint of what followed.

A gray ship on a mild but foggy winter’s day . . . its size seems exaggerated.  It was so foggy that Bergen Point was closed to all traffic over a certain tonnage, although waivers could be requested and granted.

 

The white bridge remained invisible.

 

It seemed the vessel tiptoed out,

restrained by the Moran tug.

And after she had passed, the stern remained visible as the bow blended into the fog.  The fog horn, now oriented away, seemed to have moved much farther than the ship had.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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