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I took this photo in Waterford eastern terminus of the Erie Canal on November 1, 2010, and the canal had not yet closed.  I had just returned from part of a transit, and we had met lots of boats.  Although we had been bound for the Great Lakes, most, like the intriguing Baidarka, was bound for sea.  As of this writing, Baidarka is back on the Canadian Pacific coast.

A week later, in the sixth boro, docked in front of USNS Sisler, it’s the “love it or hate it” Sea Raven, now turned into new steel.

Sea Bear was engaged in the deepening of the sixth boro, and here a crew on the sheerleg was repositioning the anchor.

Lots of dredges including GLDD New York were involved.  More later.  Captain D, currently in the sixth boro on other duties, was dredge tender.

Then, as now Atlantic Salvor, was active.   I particularly like this shot with the 0730 “golden hour” light.  A very different set of buildings then largely defined the Manhattan skyline.

Wanderbird swooped through the harbor on their way south.

Padre Island and Terrapin Island were regulars recontouring the sixth boro bed.

Beaufort Sea, 1971, is no more. 

The brilliant colored Little Bear, built 1952, became a DonJon vessel, but I’ve not seen her since the Disch auction.

Susan Witte . . . I can’t tell you anything about her either.

Back then I would spend my Thanksgivings in Philly, and the high point of that holiday was not the excellent food and drink and company, but rather seeing the big barge for the first time.

Pilot towed in La Princesa, here assisted up the Delaware by Grace and Valentine Moran.   Pilot has been sold Panamanian, and La Princesa–577′ x 105′–I’ve neither seen nor heard from.  I believe Valentine is still active, but I don’t know about Grace.

All photos, WVD, who looks at these and wonders how a decade has so quickly passed.

 

I’d seen Ocean Tower on AIS earlier and watched it pass along with its tow, but I was focused on something else, so this was my best shot.  I had caught its reddish color, the Great Lakes Dredge and Dock color. 

Phil Little caught this photo from his Weehawken cliff.  I believe the tow had gone up the North River to wait for a favorable time through Hell Gate on the other side of the island.  

Later in the day I got a query from Lew.  This was the closest he could get from his vantage point, and he wondered what that gargantuan crane was.

I concluded I should contact my friend Nelson Brace, whose photos of Cape Cod Canal transits I always found spectacular.  Nelson told me he works with a group called ‘Photogs Я Us’ .  They even have a FB page that’s a “must-see” if you do FB.

And here’s the close-up of the dredge from ‘Photogs Я Us’ …  It’s the dredge New York. I’m not sure where she has more recently been working, but she’s currently heading for Boston, where the harbor channel deepening process is on.

Her bucket can dig down to 83′ down and take up to 25 cubic yds of material.

Many thanks to the fine photographers of ‘Photogs Я Us’ for these closeups.

Also to Phil and Lew for contacting me.

I recall when GLDD’s New York was operating in the sixth boro, deepening the channels here and here.  Also, she was passively involved in an incident some of you may recall as well.  Below are more photos I took of dredge New York working just NW of the Staten Island Ferry terminal in fall 2010.

Captain D is the assist boat.  These photos show the role of the derrick over the Liebherr 996. 

Here’s a crowded dredge zone.

 

Here’s the USACE on the project in Boston.

 

What?!@#!!  See the end of this post.

 

For the past few years now, NYC municipal trash has traveled by barge and train to landfills in several states.  Captain D here is pushing this barge with containerized trash from a transfer point in Queens to a rail loading facility in Staten Island. Click here for animated explanation of trash movement overseen by DSNY.

As I understand it, the green containers are covered by a Waste Management contract, whereas the black ones, the older slightly contract, by Covanta.

One constant in the harbor has long been the Staten Island ferry; the new “constant” is these trash containers.

 

 

As a resident of NYC now for almost two decades, I have to say that for all the population density and numbers, NYC’s five terrestrial boros are relatively “tidy.”

You just can’t do what we did in my youth . . . set up a burn barrel at the hedgerow end of the farthest field and stoke it once a week.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who got photos of the new DSNY container cranes moving to the SW Brooklyn transfer station here.

And the first photo was taken from the mouth of the Bronx River, where the trash barge lined up with the Arthur Ash Stadium with a LaGuardia runway in between. Captain D was coming out of Flushing Bay.

Know this New York NY boat?

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How about this one?

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Know this background?

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The one above is Taft Beach in lower Newark Bay and that’s the Union County (NJ) Courthouse prominent in the distance.  Below that’s Captain D on garbage detail.

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I’ve no idea what’s making that brilliant flash behind Joyce D. Brown . . . unless it’s another one of those supertall buildings springing up in Manhattan.   I guess “supertall towers” supersedes “skyscraper.”

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It’s Pegasus and

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Charles A and

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Genesis Vision.  Know her former name?  It’s here . . . the top of the Great Lakes.

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OK, so the “B” in the first photo is a vestige of Banda Sea.  See the complete name in raised letters in this post (scroll) from 2009.

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And Capt. Jason looks like this.  Know it?

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Yup, Mister Jim with the paint still drying.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

If you have a lot of free time, you can trace this back to the first installment.

These photos are all from the past week, starting out with Bouchard Boys, 1975.

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Pelham, 1960.  Behind her is USNS Red Cloud.

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Barney Turecamo (1995) and

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Scott Turecamo (1998).

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Eric R. Thornton (1960)

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Jill Reinauer (1967) and Dace Reinauer (1968) with RTC 61.

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Add Stephen-Scott (1967) and Ruth M. Reinauer (2008) pushing RTC 102.

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Margaret Moran (1979) starting a backing-down of Heina with

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James D. Moran (2015).  More on this backing down later this week.

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Captain D (1974) with CVA-604.

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Meagan Ann (1975)

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Houma (1970).

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Frances (1957) and I think I know the crewman forward of the house.

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And finally, I put this photo here because of a boat in the background.  Is that Kristy Ann Reinauer (1962)?  I thought she was scrapped half a year ago already.  Hmm.

Other boats here are L. to r.) Realist, Kristy Ann, Hubert Bays, Long Splice, Samantha Miller, Stephen B, and Hunt Girls, which has been in the yard there for (?) two years now?

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

For as multipurpose as sixth boro waterways are in summertime, my perception is that safety prevails.  RORO, barge on a short wire, and canoe stay well apart.

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Ditto here with spacing.

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PWCs . .  I’ll never be a fan.

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Foreshortening masks the fact that from a vantage point like Fort Wadsworth . . . I can see over 10 miles.

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The traditional ship here was launched in 1997;  the tug beyond  . . . in 2001.

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My only question is where that classy yellow sand is going.  TZ Bridge?

All photos recently by Will Van Dorp.

 

So yesterday was of course a day for a little  . . . Aprilscherz or poisson d’avril . . ., but now I am serious.  What you see below transports garbage, which might not impress you–but that unit towed by a single tug replaces 48 trucks between Queens and Staten Island.  Spaced for safe driving, that would mean about a mile of highway congested by that garbage alone.   Many thanks to Jonathan Steinman for the photo, which he took yesterday afternoon about 4 pm yesterday.

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Piecing the whole system together–I hope correctly–here’s a photo I took of Happy Delta in Bayonne less than two weeks after Sandy roared through.

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Here’s another shot taken the same day, showing Happy Delta arriving with its cargo, the blue Kunz cranes marked NYC Sanitation, WTC1 serving as the time stamp.

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Here’s a close-up I took yesterday about an hour and a half before Jonathan took his.  Here’s the story, six of these barges were built by Senesco and completed last summer.  Here’s the story in print about the time the order was placed.  Each barge carries 48 sealed garbage containers.  The barge is light here, heading for an eastbound passage on the East River.

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Compare the freeboard above to that in the next two photos, which Jonathan took half a week ago, as the tug and barge headed westbound–and south–on the East River.

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Another four feet or so deeper in the water.  That’s a load of garbage that’s not making potholes and stressing the BQE and other roads.

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And where’s it coming from with empties?  Here’s the answer in a recent SIlive version of the Advance.  I haven’t gotten over to the south side of the Goethals Bridge yet to confirm what I think is there . . . those blue Kunz cranes.  Anybody confirm this?  Am I way off?

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I took this photo as Captain D–a single 41-year-old tug–towed the 48 empty containers out of the Kills yesterday.

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So if you needed another reason to love tugboats . . .

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Here and here are more articles on moving garbage this way.

If you think “untruckster” doesn’t work as a name for this transportation system, consider the history of the word “dumpster,” here.

Many thanks to Jonathan for his photos from the East River.   Any photos he didn’t take . . . came from Will Van Dorp.

. .. that gray vessel on the Jersey side just north of the Outerbridge, we know what it is, and

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that’s Vulcan III at its stern, but what is it doing in the Arthur Kill portion of the sixth boro?  Just curious if anyone out there knows . . .  Here and here are more sites on IX 514.

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And this from l’amiga . . . Frances pushing north and Captain D pushing south . . .

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kind of a reminder me of a Dr. Doolittle character . . .  pushmi-pullyu . .

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I hope a reader can clarify above vessel and procedure.

The first two fotos come compliments of Tony Acabono, and the last two by l’amiga, both of whom I’m grateful to for passing them along.

And to paraphrase the former vizier of defense, there are known unknowns and unknown unknowns . . .  as in these two additional fotos from l’amiga.

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I know this is Grey Shark, but will the trucks onboard come back?   What if anything is in them?  If they return, will they be empty?

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Any answers to any questions would be quite satisfactory.

Atlantic Coast (blue & white with yellow trim and mostly hidden) and Captain D line up around a dredge scow a little over a month ago.   Rank this set by  the year built and horsepower?  Answers at end.

John Reinauer passes under the Bayonne Bridge last Sunday.

Davis Sea bunkers OOCL Malaysia in late October.

Jennifer Turecamo and

Paul Andrew both head west in the KVK.

Buchanan 12, push knees feeling no load except resistance of the water, heads east.

And the rankings:  Paul Andrew–1968, John Reinauer–1969, Buchanan 12–1972, Captain D and Jennifer Turecamo–1974, Davis Sea–1982, Atlantic Coast–2007.

As for horsepower: Jennifer Turecamo–4300,  Buchanan 12 and Atlantic Coast–both 3000, John Reinauer–2800, Davis Sea and Captain D–2000, and Paul Andrew–1200.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Related:  OOCL Malaysia–built 2000 and with its 73,500 horsepower, can cruise more at more than 26 knots carrying 5672 teus.

Where I’m steering  here most corresponds to the second post in this series, Coexistence 2.  On an ideal day, all traffic gets along, sorts itself out.  Big steel and small steel keep clear of one another, again

and again, no matter what the direction or

cargo or time of hitch or

commercial alliance or lack thereof, or

speed for whatever the purpose . . . understandings get articulated, negotiated, and agreed upon.

But then without warning and from out of nowhere, the wild jumps

in.  The beast, driven by terror of the predator and the mindless urge to mate, dives in

as members of its species have for millenia.  Some have always made it, wild and unfettered.  But now the environment has

changed;  rules and conditions altered.   And intervention happens or

doesn’t.

Many thanks to Bill Bensen for the three fotos of the deer.  For the record, Bill took these fotos about three weeks ago although it may be the same buck that jumped in this week.  For more of Bill’s fotos of animals of the harbor, click here.

Other fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Info on the vessels in the fotos:  Foto 1: Bro Albert is a Maersk product tanker with an unidentified McAllister tug in the distance.  Foto 2:  Marie J. Turecamo and Kimberly Turecamo pirouette parcel tanker Stolt Vanguard out to sea.  Foto 3:  from near to far, Taft Beach, Captain D, and ATB Pati R. Moran moves the barge Charleston with assist from an unidentified Moran tug.  Foto 4:  near to far is Davis Sea and Java Sea.

Related:  I included the tug Dolphin above as an attempt to broaden the term, given  Bowsprite’s recent treat (treatise?) on inanimate harbor “animal” life.

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