You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘JRT Moran’ tag.

Summertime and the living is easy . . . and Sassafras is bringing fuel to MSC Marianna.

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JRT Moran is preparing to assist MSC Busan out of its berth

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Another section of Rockefeller University’s River Campus is shipping in aboard Witte 1401 moved by Emily Ann, 

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passing Zachery and Jason Reinauer and

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and Dean.

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Crystal Cutler moves Patricia E. Poling westbound . . .

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Brendan Turecamo assists MSC Busan back out

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on its way

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to Norfolk.

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All photos taken yesterday by Will Van Dorp, who is leaving the area for a while.  Details tomorrow.

 

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Some people are up before dawn on Easter because of work.  But at sunrise this morning from Bard Street and looking west . . . it was gray.

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Looking east . . . dawn smudged the rosy fingers’ painting.   Lucy Reinauer pushed RTC 83 in that direction, while the Moran 6000 hp tractors returned to the barn after helping Hanjin Shenzhen out to sea and southbound.

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And the Bayonne windmill has revived its current production.  Passing it in order were JRT Moran,

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and James D.  In the distance, that’s Barney Turecamo and

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Miriam also passed.

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Caitlin Ann and

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Hunting Creek also worked their way into Easter morning.

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And I decided to get to work also.  All photos by Will Van Dorp, who did versions 1 and 2 of this in previous years.  Here was a different take on Easter.  As for Caitlin Ann’s being blue . . .

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here’s how I first saw her.

 

Many thanks to Erin Urban, executive director of Noble Maritime for those photos and information.

What’s this?

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The interior view is unique;  the exterior  . . . of course has been seen so often that your eyes might see right past it.  This beacon in the harbor has appeared in countless tugster posts, and will continue to do so.  Here’s just one. What you may not know is that in the lighthouse there is a “construction cam” focused on work at the New York Wheel.  Be sure to try “live stream cam 2” and its time lapse.  

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Below is a view of CMA CGM La Scala from a week ago, the same day the Noble Maritime crew was at the light.

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Here’s the abridged written report:

“Weather:  Cloudy, not windy, mid-60s°      Access:  The Emily Miller out; the Nicholas Miller back.  Left at 9:20; back at 12:30.

Tasks accomplished:  We brought out materials with which to clean up, including contractor’s bags, brooms, cardboard boxes, and another dustpan.  We also brought out a 60 lb. bag of mortar and water.  We added a new light in the cellar and brought out two more Mag lights and a long extension cord so we can light the cellar and any other places that need it.  We also brought out another 5-gallon can of gasoline.

André cemented the area in the cellar below the new cellar door.

Pete and Kevin got the light set up in the basement and then began the clear out.  Then, with Erin, they began removing accumulated trash and unneeded equipment.  We cleaned and cleared all the rooms, especially the second floor supply room and the stairwell, and organized a tool cabinet on the first floor.  We found a box of stuff having to do with the web camera and stored it on the fourth floor in the room where the web camera batteries are set up.

The New York Wheel worker charged up the batteries for the web camera and got it working again; it had been down since last fall.

Next steps: We will go out to do more work on the interior.   We have to shovel out the cellar, for example, and finish painting the small rooms on the fourth level.

We will at the same time do a video explaining all the aspects of the work we have to do at the lighthouse.  Our spring projects will include getting more ventilation and painting the exterior so we can set up the canopy and the solar power to light the interior and exterior of the site.”

Click here for a USCG history of aids to navigation.  Here are some 360 degrees views from Robbins Reef.

Many thanks to Erin and her crew for their work and for permission to use these photos and this report.

At the same moment, I was getting these photos of CMA CGM La Scala, with JRT Moran tailing and

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Kirby Moran made up to the lower set of recessed shell bits.

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Last two photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Random, but mostly a celebration of orange.  Click here and you’ll see how obsessive i’ve been about these juice tankers.  More even than about wine tankers, which I’ve no knowledge of ever seeing.  Milk tankers, you ask?  Well, if you mean the ones that travel from farm to processing/bottling plant, I’m familiar with them but no pics.

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Shanghai Trader came in the same day.

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Orange Sun, operated by Atlanship SA, was involved in an incident near here back in 2008.

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Stealth Berana, here with Scott Turecamo and New Hampshire lightering, seems to have undergone a name-change recently.

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Back to the juice tanker, it seems that fewer than a dozen of these vessels carry one-fourth of the world supply!

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Here’s another shot of Caroline Oldendorff with ABC-1 at stern starboard quarter and Nicholas Miller passing along port.  Go, Nicholas.

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Aleuropa is another operator of juice tankers.  Carlos Fischer is one of their vessels.

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Zim Tarragona is named for an ancient port.

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A juice tanker called Southern Juice was renamed to the last three letters of its name  “ICE” for its trip to Bangladesh breakers beach.  See the story here on p. 19/20.

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The salt bulker Aghia Skepi is named for a Greek Orthodox holy day.

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Finally, Orange Sun  . . . you’d think it would have an orange hull, like the Staten Island ferry in the background, right?

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All photos of the sixth boro activities by Will Van Dorp.

Prayers for and condolences to families/friends of Specialist crew.  Here’s a photo I took of the boat back in 2007.

 

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Here was Janet D pushing crane barge Jared Walter the other day.

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Another crane barge, this one pushed by Quenames, which I never seen pushing anything but a petroleum barge.

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Tugboat Sassafras moving Doubleskin 30 into IMTT, and then going over to Brooklyn light.

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And finally, it’s Harry McNeal and Miss Julia  . .. again moving crane barges.

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Last one for today . . . it’s JRT Moran, and those do not look like deckhands on the bow.  I’m just wondering.

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The container ship being assisted is Northern Justice.

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No matter what you do, be careful out there.  Here’s the latest USCG report I could find.

Here and here are previous posts in this spirit, but first, the answer to yesterday’s bridge identification question . . . Joseph Chomicz nailed it . . . it’s Outerbridge Crossing, named for a person of commerce.

Today’s question is:  as you look through the photos in this post, can you think of a type of cargo that seems to be missing in the sixth boro in recent months?

In the photo of the self-unloader below, Outerbridge Crossing is seen from the south side, not from directly below.

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Although the light is not ideal in the photo below, this is the stern of the self-unloader Caroline Oldendorff, poised to auger salt off to a pile between the oil tanks.

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I like the effect of the flag in front of the spare wheel.  I last saw Caroline on the Mississippi here.

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Here’s an unusual tugster perspective . . . Eagle Madrid leaving the south end of the AK, passing Perth Amboy and

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snaking through the channel across Raritan Bay;  that’s Brooklyn in the background to the right.

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Here’s another unusual tugster perspective . . . Sea Halcyone (formerly Unique Sunshine) passing Shooters Island as seen from Faber Park.

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Note Margaret Moran assisting to port, and a (mothballed??) Liberty IV still on the hard to the left, and several raucous gull drones doing some pilotage.  Maybe?

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Here JPO Pisces gets overtaken by Tangier Island before

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passing MSC Katya R, who’s

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seen in by JRT Moran.

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Heina, although no self-unloader, is discharging the same cargo as Caroline Oldendorff had in her holds:  salt.

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So which cargo seems to be missing . . . in recent months?  My perception is orange juice, my favorite drink.  Have I just been missing the ships, or is there a change in the supply chain?

Again, congrats to Joseph for naming the bridge in yesterday’s post.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

First, my take on the identification of the tug from the film in yesterday’s post, it’s a model and filmed in New Deal Studios in LA.    That would explain the logistics.

So, for today, let’s start with Miss Katie . . . outbound last Thursday.

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Miss Katie, 1998

 

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Mister T, 2001

 

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Ruth M. Reinauer, 2008, pushing RTC 102

 

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Discovery Coast, 2012

 

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Kirby Moran, 2015, assisting STI Fulham

 

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JRT Moran, 2015

 

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McAllister Girls, 1968, moving B. No. 231

 

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Amy C McAllister, 1975, also assisting B. No. 231

 

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Brian Nicholas, 1966.   Sturgeon Bay, 1987

 

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Eric McAllister, 2014, passing NYK Nebula

 

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Irish Sea, 1969

 

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James D. Moran, 2015, assisting NYK Nebula

And finally, we return to Miss Katie because two days later, she caught some unwanted attention.  Details here.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are previous posts in this series.

When I saw a parade of Moran tugs heading to meet a ship or some ships, I suspected something large was coming.

And when she appeared around the bend, she did look quite large,

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Cosco Napoli did, and much as I wanted to keep my hands in my pockets, I took the photos I could.

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Kirby Moran (6000 hp) assisted.  I’m not sure if Margaret Moran (3000 hp)–to starboard–was assisting also.

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and JRT Moran (6000 hp) was back there . . .

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That’s a total of 15,000 tugboat hp, i.e., 11,185 kW, I believe.  Cosco Napoli‘s engine is rated at 69,620 kW, which converts to 93,362 hp, if I used the correct horsepower conversion, and I know how complicated the “horsepower” is.

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So, for some more numbers:  Cosco Napoli, capacity of 8000+  teu.  1099′ loa x 137′ x 45′

Comparing this container vessel to the largest one recently arrived in Oakland and Long Beach, CMA CGM Ben Franklin is 63,910 kW, 18,000+ teu, and 1309′ x 177′ x 37.’

Here’s another comparison, CSCL Indian Ocean recently grounded on the Elbe . . . her numbers look like this:  69,720 kW, 19,000+ teu, and 1311′ x 192′ x  39.’

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Click here for the previous posts in this series.  It’s good for me to revisit past posts because then I can locate and correct some errors, like having two “2”s in this series, now corrected.  I also notice that i’ve learned a thing or two about a thing or two.  Like, technically, the color is not “maroon” but “signal red.”  Or is it?  Maybe only model makers call it that? I’m also happy about the people I’ve met along the way who helped me learn these things and who sometimes send along photos.  All photos today were taken a bit south of the sixth boro and come from frequent contributor Jed Jedrlinic.

Jed took all these photos around Norfolk a few years back on the dates shown, but let me arrange the boats in the order of manufacture.

Patricia Moran was built in 1962 but then saw a major redesign and rebuilt in 1999;  it was the 4th of the MORtrac class. The only photo I’ve found of her pre-1999 is here . . .  on page 3.

photo date 9 MARCH 2010

photo date 9 MARCH 2010

I don’t mean to be critical, but the modern wheelhouse/rest of the house marriage here looks . . .  transitional to my 2016 eyes.

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Marci Moran launched in 1999, the first Moran tractor  built at Washburn & Doughty  (W & D).

photo date 5 OCT 2010

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Karen Moran, 2000, the 2nd W & D tractor.

photo date 2 JULY 2010

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photo date 2 JULY 2010

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Tracy Moran, 2000, already the 4th W & D tractor.

photo date 9 MARCH 2010

photo date 9 MARCH 2010

 

photo date 9 MARCH 2010

photo date 9 MARCH 2010

Kaye E Moran, 2003, the 8th W & D tractor.

photo date 9 MARCH 2010

photo date 9 MARCH 2010

 

photo date 9 MARCH 2010

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photo date 9 MARCH 2010

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April Moran, 2006, the 12th W & D tractor.

photo date 9 MARCH 2011

photo date 9 MARCH 2011

 

photo date 9 MARCH 2010

photo date 9 MARCH 2010

And finally, one of my photos, JRT Moran is the most recent–so far–and 29th W & D tractor for Moran. She’s barely seen here, but in the background are Kirby Moran–27th, and James D. Moran–28th by  . . . W & D.  Rhat’s also the ATB Linda Moran in the way background.

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All photos credited to John Jedrlinic, except the last one, which was taken by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s an index to the 44 prior posts by this name.  CMA CGM Parsifal here is heavily laden, looks huge–and for the sixth boro is one of the largest that have called to date–almost 11oo’ loa and around 8500 teu-capacity, but relative to the current largest container ship in the world is smaller by half, ranked by capacity.

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I’ve done lots of posts focusing on intriguing names, but Parsifal needs to be added to that list.  In the foreign-to-me world of opera, Parsifal was a “pure fool,” the only knight unsullied enough to get the magic sword back from the evil seductress Kundry.  Cool.

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Here’s JRT Moran–the sixth boro’s newest new tug–coming out to meet Troitsky Bridge.

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JRT teams up here with the venerable James Turecamo, a tandem that shows evolution in twin screw design over almost a half century.   Troitsky [trinity] Bridge is named for a structure in St. Petersburg;  for some reason it’s almost the name of a fun civil engineering competition.  Local high schools run such competitions also.

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Port Moody waits in the anchorage as USNS Red Cloud gets refurbished at GMD.

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I caught Leopard Sea in Nola here just over a year ago.

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Santa Pacific, with hatches cracked open, waits  . .  for orders?

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NS Antarctic gets around.

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Robert E. heads out for a job, passing NS Antarctic and  . . .

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Cielo di Milano, as Sandy Hook Pilots summer station boat New Jersey comes in for a call through the KVK.

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Living along the banks of the sixth boro has disadvantages, but I truly enjoy the fact that this too is part of the traffic.

 

All photos this month by Will Van Dorp.

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