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Given the location of the sixth boro, it’s not surprising how often “atlantic” appears in post titles.

It’s not quite an oxymoron, but those two words juxtaposed certainly seem odd unless you look at the context . . .    more on this at the end of the post.  But olive?  And I’m thinking the branch may be more needed now than the fruit . . .  Atlantic Olive Branch . . . on AIS?

For now, in this bright and rich morning light, let’s arc around the MR tanker and her escort . . .  Note the ship’s crew checking out the gangway . . .

as the ship passes what could be the village of St. George . . . and that link tells me I need to visit Fort Hill in the background there.

Escorting the tanker into the dock more or less straight ahead are Miriam Moran and Brendan Turecamo.

For all the apparent “non-sixth boro ness” of the tanker, the contact info for Diamond S is Connecticut . . .

Here’s looking back toward the POV of the first photo.

Happy Friday . .  .  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

This post follows up on Whatzit 36 . . . here.

Yup, it’s more parts for “the vessel.”

The two photos above come from Tony Acabono.  The rest come from Will Van Dorp.

Here Emily Ann moves some parts on Witte 1402 westbound, which confused me until I understood the routes.

 

So the parts arrive in USA/sixth boro from an Italian port on the Gulf of Trieste via a ship calling in Bayonne. Then they are stored in Port Newark until all efforts converge on getting

them here . . .

over in the the section of midtown Manhattan aka Hudson Yards, yards as in

train yards just of the west side of Penn Station Manhattan.  And there,

this monster called “the vessel” has begun rising.  At that link, you find a great slideshow featuring both with DonJon equipment and heavy lift trucks.

Since we’re talking public art, here is more I’ve seen recently . . .  Dale Chihuly’s blown glass creations displayed in the New York Botanical Garden, now until late October 2017.

Here’s more info on NYBG.

Then there’s this–which I just noticed yesterday– in Rockefeller Center, and which thankfully comes down after today . . . a 45′ gas balloon where the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree stands in late fall/early winter . . ..

Many thanks to Tony for his photos;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Click here for some of the previous posts featuring research vessels.

Here was Armstrong yesterday around this hour, but

as of this writing, she’s almost back to Woods Hole, cruising along the southern side of the Elizabeth Islands, an archipelago I’ve never visited.

For more info on

Armstrong and her mission,

click here.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s happy to see a science ship arrive with the fleet.

For more on the past 400 years of Woods Hole history, click here.

In case you’re wondering which vessel(s) will be where, here’s the navy.mil listing.  These photos are ordered in the sequence they passed lower Manhattan.

USCGC Hamilton WMSL-753,less than three years old, is home-ported in Charleston  . . . and Seattle.   How does that work?

 

RV Neil Armstrong AGOR-27 replaced the venerable RV Knorr, mentioned here once some years back.

USS Kearsarge LHD 3, named for a mountain I climbed decades ago, is the fourth in a line of vessels named for the US warship commanded by John A. Winslow that sank Confederate raider CSS Alabama, two of whose crew were Raphael Semmes and Irving S. Bulloch,  off Cherbourg France in June 1864, less than a year before the end of the devastating US Civil War.  This account of the Battle of Cherbourg is worth a read.

 

Our friends to the North always have a representation, and HMCS Glace Bay MM 701 is this year’s.

Glace Bay‘s classmate Moncton appeared on this blog back in 2012 here.

Four YPs are in town from Annapolis. Here are some YP photos from two years ago, different perspective.

Here’s YP 705.

 

And finally USNS Yuma T-EPF-8 is without a doubt the newest vessel in this procession, having been accepted earlier in 2017.

I wonder who the photographer in the yellow foulies is.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will be wandering around town trying to get more closeups these next few days.  And below is another shot of USS Kearsarge.

Here are more photos from May 1.  Betsy Ross is a product of  Yank Marine in Tuckahoe, New Jersey.  

Here, r to l, are three generations of sixth boro people movers . . . Betsy Ross, Garden State, and the new NYCFerry known as H202 for now.  Garden State was launched in 1994.

H202 crosses the bow of the mighty Helen Parker.

By an hour later, Betsy Ross is already roaring back from across Raritan Bay.

Closing shot is H202 wheelhouse as seen from the upper passenger deck . . . approaching the Marine Parkway Bridge.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is preparing to head back northward on the ICW, which I’ll call Gallatin’s Ditch.

I read the sign and decided to

wait until the greeters had left and then

bought a round trip ticket at Pier 11 for less than what I’d pay for a bagel and coffee

and got on the next ride to the Rockaways.  If you want to know specs and dimensions and such right now, click here.   Or wait, and guess who built the power plant and what the passenger capacity is, and I’ll tell you some of that at the end.

After a stop at the Brooklyn Army Terminal, we zoomed out towards the VZ at 25 knots, past Coney Island,

through the goalposts at Marine Parkway, and

to the new Rockaway dock,

where shuttles gathered or distributed potential passengers.

Then it was back to Pier 11 in the

pea soup thick

fog.

So the power plant is Baudoin Marine.  Passenger capacity is 150.  The captain requires a 100-ton license.   Here’s the NYTimes story.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s headed for the confluence of the Saluda, Congaree, and Broad soon.

 

I’ve posted photos like this one of Thomas D. Witte moving recycling, but I’ve never

been inside Pratt Industries plant on the Arthur Kill.  Recently, William Hyman has though, and he’s shared his photos here.  It looks –and probably smells–like any waste handling facility, but

giant claws move the scrap around and

caldrons do their magic and

cardboard stock comes out.

Photos I’ve taken of the recycling barges back almost 10 years ago are below.

 

Unless otherwise identified, all photos by Will Van Dorp. William Hyman’s previous photos can be found here.  Thank you, sir.

x

 

Thanks to a friend, I learned this morning what this is.  But I’ll give you an opportunity until the end of this post to ponder it as I did.

I’m guessing that since I’ve been paying attention to other soon-to-happen non-routine events in the harbor like the loading of Peking (more on that at the end of this post too) and the raising of the NYWheel legs, I completely missed this one until yesterday afternoon when I just happened to be walking to an appointment near Richmond Terrace.  Yes, I ALWAYS carry my camera, because in NYC, you never know what you are going to see in any of the six boros.

When I saw that it was DonJon equipment, I thought these might be additional structural members to be lifted into Rockefeller University’s River Campus.  After all, it was only about a year ago that preliminary structures were lifted into place over there, here and here.

Notice the curves and the staircases?

And the tow moved up toward the North–not the East–River.

So thanks to my friend Hank Beatty, those ARE structural members for something called “The Vessel,” unveiled months ago, a large assemblage of public art to be erected over at the Hudson Yards area of Midtown.  Click here for the speeches on the event of the unveiling back in September 2016:  2500 steps mounting 16 stories . . . billed as the Hudson’s Eiffel!  And the Hudsonside Midtown already has a pyramid!!

So here’s the update of Peking.  Now plans are for it to be loaded in early June onto Combi Dock III, not the identical Combi Dock I as I had been led to believe earlier.  So, put that on your calendars . . .  Thanks to T. V. for that update.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was the first of Don’s great photos, from about a year ago.  And technically, it follows from this set of pizza seawall delivery photos I caught almost a decade ago.

Your own galley turns out some delicious fare, but sometimes you feel a craving for take out, for pizza that comes in a box, which is not so easy when you’re away from shore, but then, delivery . . .

for all!  And even an average pizza is

delectable!  And the photos, they give an exquisite hint of sixth boro culture.   Sometimes bumboats –like this one once did on the Great Lakes–do this, and more regularly crew boats do. No matter how an unexpected pizza gets delivered, the very unexpectedness of it makes it even tastier.

 

Thanks much to Don for use of these photos, especially for you who didn’t see them on FB.

 

Oh . .  I don’t mean the boat that more than

once caught my attention from miles away because of that glowing color back ten years ago.

Not that striking prime mover . . . that seemed always engaged.

No, I mean

her fine namesake who passed a week ago.  My condolences to her family and close friends.   Waterskiing the East River?  I wish I had photographed that!

 

Here are some classic Tennyson words.

Click here for more pics of the orange June K and fleet mates.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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