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That is a long way from the Staten Island base these boats have long used . . .  and how many engine rooms are hot here?

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So Katie G and Colleen McAllister danced their way east to get north and way west past the dancing (or leaning) towers of the East River this morning.

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Notice you can still see the original Libby Black name in the raised metal of Katie G McAllister, soon to be named something else?

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Here’s a previous post I did featuring Katie G. remaking a tow at the Battery.

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Click here and here for posts featuring Colleen at work.  Here’s one at the dock in Mariners.

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I’m guessing this voyage will take about three weeks?

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Godspeed, and beat the ice!

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Click here for another way to move a tug with a cold engine.  And here–scroll to the 4th photo–to see another way it can be done.  And another.  And I’ll add another post here with alongside towing.

Recognize this location for sixth boro riverbank living?

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The fine print there says USNS GySgt. Fred W. Stockham (T-AK-3017), which was just outside the VZ Bridge a few days ago.

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Now it’s over by FDNY Marine 9, as if it were someone’s yacht.  The complex finally looked open, so I wandered in and

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here’s what I saw . . . right here on Staten Island.

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I don’t know who lives here or where the clientele comes from, but I’m positive the President-elect will be checking the residency papers on the opticians selling goggles.  Will there be waivers? here.

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Actually, I left quickly because this place gave me a Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy feel.

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Now THIS is a strange juxtaposition in this Potemkin Village.

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But don’t take my word and photos for it.  Click here or next time you’re in Stapleton, check the place out, before new tenant emporiums arrive.

All photos this week by Will Van Dorp.

 

I blame my dear friend Christina Sun for this post.  Well, “blame” is the wrong word, but I’ll use it. She started it many years ago with this post on her blog, a project which I believe is “under re-powering and life extension,” to borrow someone else’s phrasing, and needs some encouragement, although she’ll blame me now for speaking that.

I’m impressed by murals, official and otherwise.  Mayor Steven Fulop in Jersey City  has promoted this public art in the city on the west side of the sixth bor.  Enjoy these.

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I like the wave here, but even more, love that copper sheath on the cylindrical corner to the lower right.  It reminds me of a firecracker, or old-fashioned “rocket of the future.”

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Near FIT in Manhattan, folks were painting

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these as I passed.

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Here are some on 9th Street in Brooklyn in the block directly south of the Gowanus Canal.

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Back in Manhattan, here’s one seen from both ends on the west side of the Maritime Hotel, a once-maritime related building that was left as on the high tide mark when the port receded and left Manhattan.

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Upriver in Troy and under the Green Island Bridge, it’s Troybot, who in the third panel of four

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appears to be saving a sinking passenger vessel.

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Also in Troy and under the Route 7 Bridge, someone summoned the spirits of some exotic sirens.

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This is a unique form of tagging, drawing on the algae-covered walls of a lock chamber as it drains.

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Oswego invites its high school students in.

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That Great Lakes city also has this mural about an event in another Great Lakes city that inspired this quite profound hymn.

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Here’s a mural visible from the Cuyahoga and under a bridge in Cleveland.

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Ann Arbor’s Huron River has never known these faunas, but someone still imagined them.

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But it was in Montreal this fall that I saw the best murals, as on this wall, with a variety of influences.

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This one commemorates an actress from the Beijing opera. Click here for the back story and the artists.

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Here are some in Beacon NY a few years ago.

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And this brings me back to Staten Island, and Lina Montoya’s projects, these over along the tin sheets screening off Caddell’s.

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Philadelphia is where I first encountered the result of the city organizing a murals program. See some here.  I’ve heard about the Oakland project, but I’ve never been there.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, whose point here is that he takes photos of other things while focusing boat to boat.

 

Call this one a triple whatzit, my series driven by the watch word “if you see something, say  (or post) something.

I’ll just put up the photos, and then say what I know or don’t know.

Below, I don’t know but think it’s

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a lifeboat drill performed while Anthem of the Seas was in town the other day.

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I know the vessel as the one that’s been studying

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sharks around the world, most recently off Montauk and southern New England.  Here’s their site.  I don’t know if they are studying sharks in the sixth boro.

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And this final one, I don’t know but  am wondering if this might be part of a future Marine One fleet, doing

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test landings the other day.  Here’s more on that.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who always tries to keep his eyes wide open.

See the two big shoes on the Nadro Marine barge pushed by Margot?  You might also call them “pedestals” for the New York Wheel.  Those are size 110-ton shoes.  A little over a month ago, NY Media Boat caught the legs arriving, the legs which will wear these shoes.

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Here’s a close up with two crew getting prepared to offload these shoes.

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Chesapeake 1000–which you’ve seen working here and here–did the lift.  In the photo below taken just prior to the shoes’ arrival, Chesapeake 1000 is offloading the “multi-axle” furnished likely by Supor.  Sarah Ann assists with the swiveling of the large crane.

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Here’s a closeup of the multi-axle (there’s likely another name for that, but I don’t know it)

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and the drone that someone is using to document the transfer of cargoes.

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Here Margot finesses the Nadro/McKeil SV/M 86 with the shoes to the lift point.

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Here’s another view of the same, looking east.

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At this point, the barge is 110 tons lighter as the shoe is lifted and moved carefully onto the dock.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.  More shoes to come, although my Canadian cousins call them “boots.”

Click here for some details from SIlive.com.  And since it’s always good to see more Margot, click here.

Leaden skies cover my sixth boro today, a dour sign leading me to the Gmelin collection and the grim discovery that well over a third of the photos of shipping represented in his photos from the 1930s by a decade later were sunk or scuttled as fanaticism drew the world into war.  Take this photo taken in 1931.  To situate the photo in the sixth boro, note the Stevens Mansion–demolished in 1959– just above the stern of the ship.  Nerissa was launched in Scotland in 1926, ran between NYC–St. Johns NF until 1931, when she ran between NYC and the Caribbean.  Her end came in 1941, when she was torpedoed off Ireland by U-552, on her 40th crossing with mostly Canadian troops from Halifax to Europe.  The number of souls lost was 207.

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Here’s another victim, Empress of Britain taken in 1932.  You can see the Empire State Building less than a year “topped-out” at this time. Empress of Britain made its first crossing from Southampton to Quebec City in spring 1931.  Here she was likely completing her first visit to the sixth boro, headed for Southampton to complete her first trip around the world. In November 1939 she was requisitioned as troop transport.  Less than a year later she too was sunk by a combination of a German bomber and U-boat.    She was the largest Canadian-owned merchant vessel lost in WW2;  beyond that, she was the largest ship sunk by a WW2 submarine.  For others, click here.

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I’ll be looking for sunshine in the next days and longer.

I’m surprised I’ve not heard this be called DUBQEG, “down under Brooklyn-Queens Expressway of Gowanus” a la DUMBO.

I was here last week waiting for … and when the twin bascules of the Hamilton Street Bridge, I thought it was someone else, but

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I was equally pleased to see Sarah Ann–previously June K–arrive to exchange scrap scows,

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exchanging the light 141 for the loaded 136.

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Two things that really impressed me were (1. the intensity of multi-modal traffic at this location and

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(2. the gentleness with which the Sarah Ann crew negotiated her 2700 hp in such confined space.

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And yes that is a Coney Island bound F train approaching the Smith-Ninth Street Station, the highest subway stop in the system, one from which you can see the Statue.

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Scrapping needs to happen somewhere in the city,

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and it continues to be one aspect of marine commerce in Gowanus.

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Bravo to the Sarah Ann crew for their impressive work.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I have many more Gmelin photos, but as an indication that I still inhabit the present-day sixth boro, I’ll show some sign of life for a few days.

For outatowners, Gowanus Creek (now Canal) is one of the most polluted waterways in the US, which is no secret to locals.  By the way, Gowanus rhymes with “you want us” with a silent “t.”

I took this photo this week just upstream of the 9th Street Bridge.  In fact, when a man swam down the Canal last year, he wore some serious hazmat protection, as the Media Boat shows here.

What I was not aware of is how much effort is going into addressing the accumulated pollution of more than a century.

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This barge holds several excavators at work in the Fourth Street Turning Basin, one of the dead ends in the Canal.

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As needed, the barge is moved by this small tug/pushboat that might be called 1337E.

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Besides black goop that I might photograph next time, wood and other detritus is being plucked from the bottom.

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Gowanus, there’s hope.  I’ll be back.

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Click here and here for some posts I did when I last visited the Canal . . . in 2011 and 2013.

As to connections between the Gowanus area of Brooklyn and the Erie Canal, click here.  For a photo of the Gowanus Bay New York State Canal Freight Terminal, click here and scroll to p. 22.

It appears I’ve not put up a batch of photos of this handy floating fuel station since here, but I’ll have to check the archives later today.  For now, these are photos of Chandra B and her hard-working crew I took last week.  Know the location?

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The two buildings through-lit by sunrise are Nouvel’s 100 Eleventh Avenue and Gehry’s IAC Building.

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And in the recesses along Chelsea Piers, Chandra B is well into its workday as the sun rises.  Here she tops off Utopia III.

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Chandra B‘s crew is ready for lunch before most people have breakfast.

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Click here for some of my Chandra B photos from Professional Mariner magazine.

 

Here’s the series that this follows, a series that shows how busy this craneship still is at certain times of the year.  Of course, this could also be called what do you do with an obsolete New York City ferry, a vessel delivered by Electric Boat on October 14, 1929 and replaced by a bridge in fewer than 10 years.

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Yes, this is the bow of the craneship, and until I spent a day on board last fall, I assumed the bow wheel was non-functioning if even present.

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Excuse the rain spot.

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Closeups of bow and

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stern.

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Here’s a shot from the deck of Wards Island from the incredible warm late November day last year when we pulled a day’s worth of buoys from Oneida Lake, and at the

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end of the day, getting a glimpse of the builders plate in the engine compartment.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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