You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘New York City’ category.

The first six photo here comes from Jonathan Steinman, taken on June 13.  The Donjon tugs has delivered Chesapeake 1000 to a point just off Rockefeller University’s campus to prepare for lifting prefabricated modules for Rockefeller’s River Campus.

0613a

Step one for Donjon is to secure the gargantuan crane.

0613b

Then Atlantic Salvor moves into place to

0613c

receive the massive anchors, a job that Salvor may be IS uniquely qualified to perform.

0613d

 

0613e

The yellow lighted buoys mark the anchors’ positions.

0613f

By the time I got there on June 17, sans camera other than phone, several of the modules had already been lifted from the waterborne transport into the locations where they’ll stay for a very long time.  See time lapse of the installation of modules 1 and 2 on youtube here.

0617a

A dozen more modules will still be lifted when

0617b

water, tidal, and atmospheric conditions allow.

Click here for more information of the River Campus project, one of many construction sights to behold along the East over.  A calendar of additional lifting can be found here, subject to change.

And many thanks to Jonathan for use of his photos and information about the project.  Next time, I’ll bring my good camera.

Previous sights to behold there can be found here.

And while we’re on the topic of heavy equipment, here’s a vimeo update of of invisible gold project happening off Block Island.  I want to get back there soon.

 

 

In case you’re wondering if this blog has gone adrift . . . I’ll just plead solstice-ogling syndrome.  Why stay on course when a grape popsicle 1949 Mercury oozes by like this, and it’s tickling your tastebuds and it’s

ch1

for sale, although I did not ask any particulars.

ch2

Only at the mermaid parade could you get a photo like this, although the photographer here might

ch3

be photographing the Chevy here with a right angle spy lens.  Or maybe she was putting me in the frame?

ch4

Rattus rod!

ch5

I’d let this guy park for free.

ch6

Mesa sunrise on this mid-1950s Lincoln?

ch7

And finally, seeing this old Ford made me remember this unit from

ch8

way south Coney Island Caribbean.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has now recalled that although Coney Island is surrounded (mostly) by the sixth boro, it is still part of Brooklyn.

 

Most paraders don outlandish costumes, like this one . . . how could there be a chicken-of-the-sea

cs

named Lady Gaga.

ckiksea

And these next two photos MIGHT puzzle you . . . since the woman in black shorts and boots seems to command a lot of attention even though she is not particularly be-costumed.

cs1

Lots of attention and with a weird parasol.

cs2

Besides music and dance, I enjoy the costumes–however over-the-top or under-the-bottom– they may be.  Even librarians dress up and carry conventional parasols, as

cs4

do museum folk.

cs4b

And it’s fun, except for the man in blue shirt blocking half the street and bombing lots of my photos;  I’m sure I’m not alone in finding that just loutish.  His press pass can’t license him to photobomb that shamelessly, can it?  Maybe someone with a press pass can weigh in on protocols for photographers at events like this?

cs5

Sometimes paraders break out of the procession and pose with the kids at the parade.  I like that.

cs6

 

cs6b

 

cs3

 

cs7

If you haven’t seen the 1979 movie called The Warriors, here’s a reference to that.  I like that movie now because it depicts what parts of the city are said to have looked like 40 years ago.

cs8

Well, start counting down the days until the 2017 parade and make plans to be there.

cs9

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  If you didn’t recognize the woman in the black shorts near the top of this post, here’s the story.

Meanwhile, here’s my second shorter recording of Gypsyfunk Squad.  Here was the first one.

Soon after this shot, the queen of hearts and troupe danced for the judges with this on a loud sound box.  That makes for a good day, even though I can’t remember Alice, a rabbit, or the dormouse.  But that’s one of the things I love about the parade . . . good music and dancing.

heartdanc1

After then parade, Gypsy Funk Squad played on . . .  Here’s my phone-recorded sample of King Jack Neptune playing the oud, with a mermaid queen, percussion and dancers.  Hear more oud–related to the lute–here.

oud1

Of course, Dick D. Zigun, honorific mayor of Coney Island,  always leads off the parade with his drum and band.

drum

I’ve never seen this sort of Mexican dancer in the parade, but they surely raised the bar for quality.

mexdanc1

And of course, mermaids can make politics much more palatable than most politicians or media marketeers.

lead

But mostly, it’s exuberant music and ecstatic dancing.

hapdanc

How many starfish have you seen trumpeting?

mermbrass2

And high octane drumming overcomes stasis.

drum2

Enjoy the photos, the solstice, and the strawberry moon.

oud2

 

mexdanc2

 

hapdanc2

 

drum1

 

mermbrass

 

end

Click here for mermaid parade years and here for annual solstice mermaid migration years.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who WAS a judge!

 

Here were previous snapshots of sample small craft on the sixth boro, a city of water all summer and all other seasons as well.  Here one of the four-season RIBs of NY Media Boat passes along the western margins of Brooklyn, where a lot of folks congregate in the evening.

sc

Manhattan is one of Classic Harbor Line‘s vessel.

sc1

Crew launch Christian works all summer and all other seasons too.

sc2

Tara heads under the Brooklyn Bridge as light fades.

sc3

Fish appear to be active over where Kate used to chum with food scraps.

sc4

And this skipper seemed to enjoy pushing his craft against the currents in Hell Gate.

sc5

 

sc11

 

sc10

 

sc9

 

sc8

And there are so many other small craft in all parts of the sixth boro.   All these photos taken recently by Will Van Dorp.

Land mass area can be quantified in square miles, but I’d love to work with a mathematician to measure the area within NYC limits which is navigable, i.e., the sixth boro.  Of course, “navigable” would need defining too. Immeasurable, of course, is the number of photos  taken daily of vessels with the sixth boro.

Like this one of Crystal Cutler pushing

rt4

Patricia E. Poling westbound at the Brooklyn Bridge.

rt3

Taft Beach pushes BMLP 703 and 305 in the opposite direction.   Also working recently have been

rt2

Paul Andrew with scrap,

rt5

Sarah Ann with more scrap,

rt6

Thomas D. Witte with crane barge Columbia,

rt7

James E. Brown with a spud barge,

rt8

and Fort Schuyler in various locations.

rt9

rt1

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated, here’s an interesting video on the salvage of  Modern Express . . . passed along by JM.

Also, as we near the mermaid parade, here are details on a performance to get you in the mood, an adaptation of Oscar Wilde’s the “Fisherman and his Soul.”

 

This collage of orange and blue indicates that something unusual approaches . . .

mf1

0846 hr . . .

mf2

0904

mf3

 

mf4

 

mf5

Atlantic Salvor might have been headed out on a long range mission, but

mf6

at this point, I realized this mission would begin in the Lower Bay of the sixth boro along with

mf7

lots of other vessels, although

mf8

 

mf9

something new this year was the escort of four commercial tugs:  Sassafras, Miriam Moran, 

mf10

Atlantic Salvor, and Normandy.   1150.    I was happy to find someone to talk to.

mf11

It’s fleet week NYC.  Welcome all.

mf12

It’s USS DDG 96,

mf13

HMCS D 282,

mf14

WMEC 911,

mf15

HMCS MM 700,

mf16

HMCS MM 708,

mf17

LHD 5,

mf18

DDG 99,

mf19

and LSD 43.

mf20

At 1216, Eric McAllister joins the welcome party . . .

mf21

 

mf22

 

mf23

WLM 552.

mf24

An E-2 flew by too.

fw

 

mf25

The message on the port wheel well ((?) amused me.

mf26

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was last year’s arrival.

 

Yesterday was National Maritime Day.  At the edges of the Upper Bay, people associated with the maritime industries gather for a memorial.

vm1

at Marisol Escobar’s American Merchant Mariners’ Memorial statue.

vm3

Two of the newest tugboats in the sixth boro–Fort Schuyler and Kings Point, named for two area maritime academies–stood off.

vm2

 

vm4

 

vm5

Service and sacrifice were honored.

vm6

Prayers and

vm7

other words were offered by SCI’s Rev. David Rider and Marad’s Paul “Chip” Jaenichen.

vm8

 

vm9

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I suppose I could call this RT 163b, since the photos in both were taken the same day, same conditions of light and moisture.

Let’s start with Charles D. McAllister with Lettie G. Howard bare poles in the distance.

ns10

Evelyn Cutler with Noelle Cutler is tied up alongside a barge with Wavertree‘s still horizontal poles. Click here to see Evelyn as I first saw her.

ns9

Viking is high and dry, post the winter work.

ns8

Timothy L. Reinauer is back in town after a very long hiatus, at least from my POV.  This may have been the last time I saw her.

ns6

Mary Gellatly gets some TLC as well;  click here for the previous time she was in a “random” post.

ns7

Beyond Mister Jim, a pile of sand is growing in the yard just west of the Bayonne Bridge on the Staten Island side.

ns5

Elizabeth and Marjorie B. McAllister head out for a job.

ns4

Tasman Sea heads for the yard as

ns2

Amberjack departs.

ns1

 

And for closure, it’s Marjorie B passing in front of a relatively ship-free Port Elizabeth.  Click here for a photo of Marjorie B high and dry a few years ago.

ns3

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

And in contrast to all that, in Niigata earlier today, here’s some great vessel christening photos from Maasmondmaritime.

I considered calling this “random vessels,” since I haven’t used that title in a while, but here is a tighter focus for a few days:  tugboats.  Here I also randomize the backgrounds and seek out some vessels infrequently seen.  Like the rare and exotic  Shelby Rose and

rt4b

Jay Michael and Vicki M and

rt5

Patricia with her racing stripes up against the gantry arms.

rt6

Wye River and James E. Brown here cross the south end of Newark Bay, where

rt7

Sandmaster has been tied up for (?) nearly a year now.

rt99

Sassafras did a circle in Erie Basin recently, and

rt8

 

Thomas, the Weeks tug, strode into town, picked up a barge and headed straight for Texas!  The first time I saw Thomas was January 2009.  Remember what memorable event splashed into the Hudson around the middle of that month?

rt4

 

Buchanan 12 here is light and seen from almost her prop wash.  I hadn’t noticed the Boston registry before.

rt1

Quantico Creek stays local a lot, but Severn I don’t see much.

rt2

Here’s Tangier Island behind . .  yes, Gerardi’s Farmers Market. 

rt3

 

OK . . . that’s it for today.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.  More random tugs tomorrow.

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 945 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

Archives

June 2016
M T W T F S S
« May    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 945 other followers