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Algoma Mariner (2011) heads upriver with a load of ore.  This time of year and until the St. Lawrence Seaway opens, Montreal is the head of navigation, so that’s where the ore will be discharged and sent further by rail.

Pilot exchange at Quebec City is facilitated by Ocean Ross Gaudreault (ORG).

 

 

Minutes after the exchange, ORG (94′ x 37′) cuts a swath back to the base

using its 5000 hp through the freshwater ice that’s come down from

Lake Saint Pierre.

Back in September, I got these photos of the pilots’ exchange.

 

For some info on the Canadian Pilots, Laurentian Region, click here.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

I’ve done a few dozen “port of” posts in the past few years.

I won’t tell you where Akureyri is yet,

but the geography is a clue.

So is the name of this pilot boat, which was built in this port.  Sleipnir was built in 1995, with dimensions 52′ x 16.4′ and is powered by a single 700 hp Cummins.  Mjolnir is slightly older and smaller.

Last chance to guess . . .

And the location of Akureyri is midway east-west along the north shore of Iceland, and about as far from Reykjavik as is Boston-New York.  Sleipnir was built here.

Many thanks to Klaus Intemann, whose site is here.  Klaus is looking eagerly for photos from NYC that relate to the departure this spring of Peking for Germany.

Did you recognize the name Sleipnir, an appropriate name for a pilot boat . . . ?

Answer is here.

 

Hats off to the small boats that work all year round . . . crew boats,

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patrol boats,

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fishing boats,

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line boats,

pilot boats,

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dive boats,

more fishing boats,

more crew boats,

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government boats,

more —soon to face major cuts--government boats

more line and boom boats,

and here’s a special . . . a historic life boat, long atop Binghamton, which is still intact as far as I know, and a bit longer ago had

guys in hazmat suits doing the last ever lifeboat drill aboard the 112-year-old condemned ferry.

And finally, of course there’s the New York Media Boat. 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who gives a hat tip to all the crews in small boats on the big waters.

 

See the Fort?

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No, I don’t mean Fort Hamilton on the other side . . . or the top of the bunker at Fort Wadsworth.

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This is the closest you can get to Fort Lafayette from land . . .

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at least, what’s left of it, where it once stood before it was dismantled to serve as the base for the Brooklynside tower for the Verrazano Narrows Bridge.

And Robert Cobb Kennedy, he was a would-be arsonist  or maybe reckless jokester Confederate officer who was was tried, convicted, and hanged in Fort Lafayette  less than two months before the end of that war.

Do any readers have photos of the Fort before demolition?  It would have to be from the late 1950s or earlier.

Here’s more about the VZ Bridge.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

You may recall that back in 2014, I often juxtaposed  canal&river/rail in photos like the one below.

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This post was originally going to feature only photos of the river and canal from the rails, like the one below, but

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then I decided to pair photos from the train toward the water with the opposite:  photos from the water toward roughly the same land area where the rails lay and the trains speed.

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Train shots are difficult because of speed, coatings on the windows, trees and poles along the tracks . . .  but I’m quite sure a letter that begins “Dear Amtrak:  could you slow down, open windows, and otherwise accommodate the photographers” would not yield a positive response.

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I hope you enjoy this attempt on my part.  And if you ever have a chance to ride Amtrak along the Hudson, Mohawk, and Lake Champlain . . . sit on the better side of the car; switch sides if necessary.

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Here we’re on the Livingstone Avenue Bridge looking south and

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here we are south of it, looking north.  Yes, that’s Crow, Empire, W. O. Decker, and Grand Erie passing through the open swivel.

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Here’s the pedestrian bridge in Amsterdam

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as seen from both vantage points.

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The 1766 Guy Park Manor from a speeding train and

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from the Mohawk River/Erie Canal, where post-Irene repair has been going on since 2011.   Here’s a photo taken soon after the unusual weather.

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Schoharie Aqueduct from Amtrak,

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a slow boat, and

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the east bank of Schoharie Creek.

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Little Falls onramp to I-90 from rail and

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below.

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The rail bridge at Lock 19 from the span and

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from west of it at Lock 19.

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And these all east of Utica I can’t pair, but decided to include here anyhow:  a dairy pasture,

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a construction yard, and

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a truck depot.

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Maybe if I write that “Dear Amtrak” letter, I could just ask if the window could be cleaned a bit.  If you’re going to try this, take amtrak when the leaves are off the trees.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who embeds this post from “Good Morning Gloucester” to reveal a bit of my past . . . 1988.  Scroll all the way through to see a piece of shipwreck “treasure.”

What happens if you build a pilot boat in Massachusetts to be used on the Great Lakes?  It needs to get to its place of use.

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Thanks to the NY Media Boat, I got these photos this week as the Huron Spirit hurried through

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the sixth boro.   North of the watery boro, I was invited to ride through the Erie Canal  before it closes on November 20.

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Above is the wall above lock 16 and below, it’s the approach to lock 19, where you have to first duck under the triple-track rail bridge.

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The photo below, taken at lock 21, was Wednesday afternoon.  By now, the newest Gladding Hearn pilot boat has exited the Canal and is making its way up the Great Lakes chain.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wrote this story on the Lakes Pilots.

Another secret salt’s been photographing, this one in the waters near Galveston, a place I’ve not been.

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Here he passed San Roberto and Rana Miller, which I have not seen in the sixth boro since 2009.

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The orange boats are AET, and assist with lightering operations, as does Rana.   Josephine K Miller must be offshore.

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Mr. Henry works for Barry Graham Oil Services.

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Thor is one large tractor tug.

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I’m not sure what vessel that is in the foreground, but

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Ocean Star appears to be a petroleum museum, a concept I’d not considered,

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whereas these rigs have not yet been promoted–or demoted–to museum service.

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One of these years, i’ll have to gallivant this way.  Many thanks to the secret salts.

 

Here’s an article published by the USCG on this profession. And here’s my article/photos from the October 2016 issue of Professional Mariner on Lakes Pilots Association, District 2.  The photos in this post are outtakes from that article.

Below the captain of Huron Belle maneuvers into position to switch a District 2 pilot for a District 3 pilot on an upbound ship at the south end of Lake Huron.

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Here Great Lakes tugs Mississippi and

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Nebraska finesse a ship to negotiate a narrow bridge span on the Maumee River, as guided

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by a Lakes District pilot.  Imagine calling the commands to ship’s helm and tugs on bow and stern while watching this evolution from the bridge wing  700′ back from where the ship steel could splinter the bridge wood and steel. A seiche here can cause the river to run upstream, and that bridge, which sees a fair amount of water traffic, is a midwest version of the Portal Bridge.

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Pilots read the water as well as a plethora of tools to keep shipping without incident. Mark Twain said that as a pilot he “mastered the language of the river,”  and that’s still a requirement today.

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And there’s always the transfer of pilots, which represents a significant risk.

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This was a calm day, but in adverse conditions,

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this is a challenge not to be understated.

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Almost all photos here by Will Van Dorp.

Here are the previous posts I’ve done on the wind farm southeast of Block Island.  I took the photo below on June 27, as blades to spin the turbines arrived in Narragansett Bay.

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Rod Smith took the rest of these photos in late July and early August.

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It shows Brave Tern as it prepared to sail out to the farm, deploy its sea legs . .  aka spuds  . .

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and put the caps atop the columns onto the bases.

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For the specs on Brave Tern, you can check them out here,

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or here,

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or

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here.

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And check out the froth from her stern!

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To keep up with construction off Block Island, check out the Deepwater Water site.  Or for even more updates, friend them on FB.

Many thanks to Rod Smith for all these photos except the first one.

I hope to get out that way in October.

Let’s start with one that I can’t identify, other than by its name . . . Charlie E, I believe.  I took this photo in Port Colborne.

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I was wrong when I thought McKeil’s Sharon M I was an ex-Candies tug like Na Hoku or Greenland Sea.  It turns out she was built in Japan.

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I can’t ever remember seeing a heaping load of coal like this . . .

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Petite Forte was docked also along the Welland Canal with barge St. Mary’s Cement.

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I’ll put up a pilot boat post soon.  Meanwhile, can you identify this pilot boat?

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Jaclyn is a 41′ tug built in 1967.

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Joncaire, it turns out, is an important name in Niagara history.

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Eagle is a 57′ tugboat built in 1943 and operating out of Cleveland. Here she heads for the outer harbor.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is unpacking as quickly as possible, and preparing to repack soon.

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