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Looking from the Anthony’s Nose side of the bridge down toward Jones Point, you can sense the scale of the terrain from the way it shrinks the ship,

BBC Seine on the Hudson passing Iona Island.

That’s the south slope of  Bear Mountain to the right.  I’m not sure whether the other peaks have separate names.  More of that mountain can be seen below and was included in this post from almost half a year ago.

BBC Seine was moving quite fast with a favorable current . . . 15+ kts, I believe.

How’s that for a wake.  Is there another word for this indication of turbulence?  Anyhow, at that point, I heard a noise from high up on the bridge that

sounded like this.

Such was the occurrence.   Can anyone identify the prey by the feet?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

On January 10 Emily Ann was moving crane barge eastbound in the Kills.

Columbia New York has lift capacity of 400 tons.

Any time I see Emily Ann, I think of a story shared here by a reader about her role in saving lives in the Florida Strait.

A reliable source tells me that even juvenile loons know this story, although they’ve not yet seen a crane like this.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was the first in this series of titles, from almost seven years ago.

The barge with green containers, the bridge, and the Glovis roll on-roll off (RORO) vessel all look great bathed

in January morning light,

a bit of wolf moon light thrown in as well.

I don’t know if this RORO has called here before, but she is less than a year old,  

and you can tell.

She leaves our fair city for Tema, Ghana.  I’d love to see her in tropical light.  Anyone there reading this?

And here’s the FLOFLO for today, this common goldeneye who flew onto this water and will flow off north when the days lengthen and the sun gets hotter.   The last other type of FLOFLO–the one that floated Peking out– was documented here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s eager to hear from folks in Ghana on this vessel.

I’ve mentioned before that this is my miscellaneous category, although “everything” you pull out of your line locker or junk drawer is important for something, “miscellany” sounds dismissive.

Here’s how this post  works:  I’ll put in no comment until the second time through.  Starting with the one below, see the man face mostly down in the small craft sculling with right hand.  See the “cannon” forward, recoil preventer in place?

 

Someone’s altar?

I’d meant to include this a few weeks ago, but forgot.

And here . . . notice a splash of color where often you’d just read a phrase like “safety first” or “no smoking”?  Ice waters below and

lock walls here.

“Yes!!   I beat the ship,” thought he.   But why’s he blowing the horn so much, a**hole!!@#, thought he.

And finally . . . ever stop into a Wawa for coffee?  I’ll get back to that.

Reprise time.  See the gun there?  I paced it out at about nine feet long.  It’s a punt gun, formerly used by “market hunters” in a host of flyways, including locally along Long Island.  I finally visited the New York State Museum in Albany recently, and this is one of the displays.  Much more about punt guns and sneak boxes here.

Nearby in the Museum, here’s a sixth boro diorama.  Meseck boats came up in the previous line locker post also. And here’s the Carroll Towing post I’d wanted to include that 1946 clipping in.

And the painting on the forward side of the superstructure, here’s more on that CSL project to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the creation of an independent Canadian confederation.  And if you ever wonder what the francophone Canadians call the “Canada goose,” it’s a bernache du Canada.

And that SUP racing to cross the river in front  of a ship!  It’s that season, and soon conditions like those that created a near-fatal incident last summer will present themselves again.  Don’t be a statistic!  Here’s James Berman’s article from Workboat magazine with the “wheelhouse perspective.”

And Wawa, I’d read this and let it slip through my fingers.  They are having an ATB unit built.  Nah . . . not to transport coffee, which is sold at their midAtlantic convenience store gas stations. I’m wondering what they’ll call it . . . Wawa One?  Wawa Wanna cuppa?  Watuppa?

 

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who wishes you a happy and peaceful day..

I don’t care that it’s February, but the number of subsequent days with temperatures over 50 degrees in the sixth bor0 tells me it is spring–or has been.

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Notice the difference between Severn and Fort Schuyler?  Here proximity highlights the difference in height of the upper wheelhouse,

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but Severn is of the 4200 hp class and fort Schuyler, the 3000.

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Ah, the line and boom boats.

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Joan is one of the Moran “giraffe” boats and see HR Otter?

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She reminds me of the long gone Odin.

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Here’s a closer-up of the HR Otter, a name that immediately conjures up Kenneth Grahame.

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Some different pairs are possible here, and they’d be the same.

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See the pair there?

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a pair of hands.  Is there a word for the painted design centered on the bow of some vessels, like figureheads but not?

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Hope they clap for mardi gras!

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

A news story I read this morning prompts this continuing of the critters series.  I link to the story at the end of this post.  All the following photos I’ve taken since September, and filed away until I feel there’s a story.   Let’s start here in a New Jersey marsh creek,

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go to the North Fork,

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the KVK,

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more of the KVK,

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still more there,

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and finally to the freshwater in the Erie Canal.

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So here’s the story about a laker captain and his floating forests  . . . .  Click here for more info on part of Pittsburgh Steamship Division fleet.

All critter photos by Will Van Dorp.

To clarify this title, the first post in the series has a lead photo showing a map of our journey broken into legs marked by pins.  Legs 4 through 6 took us from Waterford, shown below, to Oswego.

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Urger stood by all spiffed up for the steamboat festival.

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Erie Canal Cruises accommodated sightseers eastbound toward lock E18.

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Tender 4, the electric motor vessel, assisted in a dredge project.

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Tug Erie tied up at the end of the work day.

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Here’s the cutterhead of one dredge.

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Lucy H returned light past Rome, NY.

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Never have I seen so

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many bald eagles.  This one is banded.

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And leg 6 ended in Oswego.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will post again when able.

 

Click here to scan the many posts with KVK in the title.  Here’s a new one inspired by arrivals that had many folks, aship and ashore, paying attention.

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Wavertree is suddenly and lavishly being regaled with sights of 21st century merchant vessels

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Products tanker Polaris, delivered 129 years after Wavertree

and crew from all over the world are paying attention.

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And a mile farther east, at the old gypsum dock, tugboats like Laura K Moran and

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Stephen B pass.

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If you want to read a good book about when and how the US took possession of Eagle, read Captain Gordon McGowan’s The Skipper and the Eagle. The book has an introduction by Peter Stanford, a foreword by Alan Villiers, and the journey starts out from NYC’s own LaGuardia.

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I have many more closeups of the barque;  maybe

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I’ll put them up if I get encouragement.  A previous posts featuring Eagle can be seen here.   For a comparison of steering apparatus on Eagle with other vessels, click here.

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Here Swallow Ace crew check out an Eagle.

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The long street on the landside of this portion of the Kills is called Richmond Terrace.  For photos and explanation of what is and used to be there, click here and here,  from the ever fascinating forgotten-by.com.  Click here to see an image of a square rigger bulk carrier docked in front of Windsor Plaster Mills, now an Eastern Salt facility, in its heyday.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

As you know, today is the first full day of spring, and this morning roar man looked like this.

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My neighborhood looked like this, and

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a local shipyard looked like this, with snow obscuring the name entirely or

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partly.

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But lest you think I’m glum  . . . my day blossomed as soon as I saw

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this . . . juices–at least orange juice–flowing, infusing by the ton into the port.  And this . . .

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new life–at least a vessel new to me in the sixth boro.  Welcome Josephine K. Miller.

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And you guy below and friends, you gotta go.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp. Snow obscured tug is of course Little Toot, only recently employed in North river icebreaking.

Click here and then scroll to the last three pics;  you’ll see a sixth boro version of the photo below, taken just east of Lyons.

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Near the Montezuma, these passed twice, and they were certainly not the mute type.

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Lots of herons hunt for fish from the locks, but they fly away as a boat appears.  This one, however, may have thought himself fleet

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footed enough to play ostrich.

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The parrot that share an apartment with me stretches each morning before flying; ospreys  . . . it appears . . . do the same, especially

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if they transport meals like this.

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Final shot for today . . . the four-point buck here just about to  find footing and camouflage on the north bank.

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All photos here taken by Will Van Dorp, who has access to wifi AND a more contemporary computer tonight.

 

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