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The spate of vessels these days with bird names like Shearwater, ONE Apus, ONE Stork, NYK Crane, NYK Blue Jay, NYK Falcon, Dodo, Southern Owl . . . prompts this post.

During the time I sit by the water, I sometimes walk circles for exercise or talk to folks.  I listen to the radio occasionally.  I never fish, but I watch others do it and I take photos of birds, like here and  a lot of them here.

These are from the past half year or so.  Buffleheads are reverse snowbirds, at least reverse in the sense I hear it used;  you see them here only in cold dark months.

I could be wrong with some of these identifications . ..  but I’d guess two males and one female greater scaup, 

. . . male red-breasted merganser,

 

Canada (or Canadian???)  geese adult and young,

a common loon male, which you generally hear before you see,

a fearsome looking male grackle . . .,

more mergansers, and

some kind of gull, which a friend just calls “homie.”

So now you know . . .  some of the other types of photos I take along the water/land divide.

I almost forgot this guy . . . .

 

Imagine seeing this on the Belt Parkway . . .  a Bell helicopter on a trailer doing the speed limit.   Aren’t these things capable of speeds more like 150?

Wait . . . this one is damaged and the flotation bags have been deployed!!   It’s THAT helicopter!

If you watched network news last week, you may have seen this crash on the nightly news . . .  Click on the photo for more on the New York Media Boat and its multiple possibilities.

Never would I have imagined seeing this chopper, but there it was passing me on the Belt, followed by quite the colorful escort truck running interference as needed.

I occurs to me that this chopper, reportedly a Bell 206, blurs the sixth boro/other boros distinction, making it a sort of sea bird:  it typically lands on any of the terrestrial five boros, it flies seamlessly over them and over the sixth boro, which it can also land on.

Unexpected post by Will Van Dorp, who wonders where the aircraft was headed.

 

Spring and fog coexist a lot, and from there, the gradation from fog to summer haze is somewhat blurred.  Blue-hulled Oyster Catcher, in the foreground, gives clearest indication that this in not a black/white/gray photo.  I’ve searched online fruitlessly to confirm that Oyster Catcher is an NYC DEP vessel.  When

A panoply of vessels converge in the Narrows as the great gray ULCV approaches from many days at sea.

 

I’ve not been paying attention to how many of these ULCVs have multiple bow thrusters.  Anyone know the horsepower on each?

 

 

 

Three 6000s, one 3900, and two brants . . . all converging along with Cosco Faith.

For scale, notice the 25′-to 30′ outboard passing just to the right of the letter O in COSCO.  More to scale, note the size of engineering crew next to this crankshaft.

I waited for a messenger line for the deckhand to send up the towline, but  . . . it happened after they were out of range for me.

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I haven’t used this title in half a decade, but today I couldn’t resist. JRT waited at the Staten Island side of the VZ.

But so were the geese, the brants.

Lots of them.

As well as the gulls.

James D joined JRT as an escort gull whizzed overhead.

Now you see it?

Now?

Jonathan C meets NYK Blue Jay!!

More birds soon.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Looking from the Anthony’s Nose side of the bridge down toward Jones Point, you can sense the scale of the terrain from the way it shrinks the ship,

BBC Seine on the Hudson passing Iona Island.

That’s the south slope of  Bear Mountain to the right.  I’m not sure whether the other peaks have separate names.  More of that mountain can be seen below and was included in this post from almost half a year ago.

BBC Seine was moving quite fast with a favorable current . . . 15+ kts, I believe.

How’s that for a wake.  Is there another word for this indication of turbulence?  Anyhow, at that point, I heard a noise from high up on the bridge that

sounded like this.

Such was the occurrence.   Can anyone identify the prey by the feet?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

On January 10 Emily Ann was moving crane barge eastbound in the Kills.

Columbia New York has lift capacity of 400 tons.

Any time I see Emily Ann, I think of a story shared here by a reader about her role in saving lives in the Florida Strait.

A reliable source tells me that even juvenile loons know this story, although they’ve not yet seen a crane like this.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was the first in this series of titles, from almost seven years ago.

The barge with green containers, the bridge, and the Glovis roll on-roll off (RORO) vessel all look great bathed

in January morning light,

a bit of wolf moon light thrown in as well.

I don’t know if this RORO has called here before, but she is less than a year old,  

and you can tell.

She leaves our fair city for Tema, Ghana.  I’d love to see her in tropical light.  Anyone there reading this?

And here’s the FLOFLO for today, this common goldeneye who flew onto this water and will flow off north when the days lengthen and the sun gets hotter.   The last other type of FLOFLO–the one that floated Peking out– was documented here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s eager to hear from folks in Ghana on this vessel.

I’ve mentioned before that this is my miscellaneous category, although “everything” you pull out of your line locker or junk drawer is important for something, “miscellany” sounds dismissive.

Here’s how this post  works:  I’ll put in no comment until the second time through.  Starting with the one below, see the man face mostly down in the small craft sculling with right hand.  See the “cannon” forward, recoil preventer in place?

 

Someone’s altar?

I’d meant to include this a few weeks ago, but forgot.

And here . . . notice a splash of color where often you’d just read a phrase like “safety first” or “no smoking”?  Ice waters below and

lock walls here.

“Yes!!   I beat the ship,” thought he.   But why’s he blowing the horn so much, a**hole!!@#, thought he.

And finally . . . ever stop into a Wawa for coffee?  I’ll get back to that.

Reprise time.  See the gun there?  I paced it out at about nine feet long.  It’s a punt gun, formerly used by “market hunters” in a host of flyways, including locally along Long Island.  I finally visited the New York State Museum in Albany recently, and this is one of the displays.  Much more about punt guns and sneak boxes here.

Nearby in the Museum, here’s a sixth boro diorama.  Meseck boats came up in the previous line locker post also. And here’s the Carroll Towing post I’d wanted to include that 1946 clipping in.

And the painting on the forward side of the superstructure, here’s more on that CSL project to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the creation of an independent Canadian confederation.  And if you ever wonder what the francophone Canadians call the “Canada goose,” it’s a bernache du Canada.

And that SUP racing to cross the river in front  of a ship!  It’s that season, and soon conditions like those that created a near-fatal incident last summer will present themselves again.  Don’t be a statistic!  Here’s James Berman’s article from Workboat magazine with the “wheelhouse perspective.”

And Wawa, I’d read this and let it slip through my fingers.  They are having an ATB unit built.  Nah . . . not to transport coffee, which is sold at their midAtlantic convenience store gas stations. I’m wondering what they’ll call it . . . Wawa One?  Wawa Wanna cuppa?  Watuppa?

 

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who wishes you a happy and peaceful day..

I don’t care that it’s February, but the number of subsequent days with temperatures over 50 degrees in the sixth bor0 tells me it is spring–or has been.

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Notice the difference between Severn and Fort Schuyler?  Here proximity highlights the difference in height of the upper wheelhouse,

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but Severn is of the 4200 hp class and fort Schuyler, the 3000.

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Ah, the line and boom boats.

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Joan is one of the Moran “giraffe” boats and see HR Otter?

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She reminds me of the long gone Odin.

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Here’s a closer-up of the HR Otter, a name that immediately conjures up Kenneth Grahame.

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Some different pairs are possible here, and they’d be the same.

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See the pair there?

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a pair of hands.  Is there a word for the painted design centered on the bow of some vessels, like figureheads but not?

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Hope they clap for mardi gras!

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

A news story I read this morning prompts this continuing of the critters series.  I link to the story at the end of this post.  All the following photos I’ve taken since September, and filed away until I feel there’s a story.   Let’s start here in a New Jersey marsh creek,

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go to the North Fork,

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the KVK,

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more of the KVK,

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still more there,

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and finally to the freshwater in the Erie Canal.

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So here’s the story about a laker captain and his floating forests  . . . .  Click here for more info on part of Pittsburgh Steamship Division fleet.

All critter photos by Will Van Dorp.

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