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In part 1, Treasure Coast slowly made her way to mid KVK, and I thought it was to get fuel, but it was soon apparent that she was there for an assist, to help ATB Galveston and Petrochem Producer to get off the dock.

The scale of Galveston is apparent from the workboat;  the tug is 144′ x 46′.

She’s slightly larger than Lynne M. Rose, and works with a total of 12,000 hp.

My vantage point has not changed here, so the movement here derives from the ATB powering astern.

Notice just to the left to the mooring line spools . . .

Normandy is the second assist tug.

Once the ATB is pointed east, the assist tugs back off.

 

 

 

Treasure Coast follows the ATB toward the Upper Bay.

As of posting, ATB Galveston/Petrochem Producer are off Palm Beach on their way to western Louisiana.

All photos, WVD, who has just confirmed a return to the bayous of western LA myself next week.

Unrelated:  If you’ve always dreamed of owning a tugboat yacht, here‘s one that popped into my feed just before post time.  Below are two photos I took of the same tugboat, Shenandoah, in Waterford on September 13, 2009.

Tug44 was a friend of the Buffalo-based owners at that time, Baltimore registry notwithstanding.

 

I’ve mentioned before here that I used to freshwater fish, a lot.  Canoe fishing at daybreak was the best, although there were days when nothing seemed alive in places where other days the waters fizzed with life and I could have several meals of fish in the boat before most people were awake.  The same could be said about sitting in certain places along the sixth boro.  This happened the other morning.  First Pelham left the dock.  

Just east of the salt pile she passed Treasure Coast, which was just more than stemming at two or so knots.

 

After pirouetting for a while just off Atlas Yacht Club, she spun back eastward and I thought she was going to refuel.   Adjacent to Treasure Coast are ATBs Galveston and Ruth M. Reinauer. I was introduced  to US Shipping back in 2008 with their ITB Philadelphia here, here, and here.

And we’ll pick things up there tomorrow.

All photos, WVD.

Related:  File this under the “I heard that but didn’t process it at the time” heading:  US Shipping Corp was acquired by Seacor almost a year ago.  Seacor is quite the diverse shipping company.  I recall last late summer was busy, and I didn’t come to understand that fact until now.  US Shipping has maintained their white/red/green livery.

Tangentially related:  Want to see a tugboat “constructed” in a 10-minute video?  Check out this video from Ocean Groupe from Canada.

Clearly unrelated but FUN:  Check out this live-eel barge . . .  it transports live eels!  Thx, Phil.

Consider this to be in the spirit of Dawn 2021.  I wasn’t there at dawn because the ship I wanted to catch–CMA CGM Von Humboldt–departed in the 0’darks, but I arrived a bit later, cold notwithstanding.

The first tugboat I photographed in 2022 was Zeus!  Truth be told, her profile against the Raritan highlands was unmistakeable, but I was a half hour too late for a better shot;  I hadn’t expected a traffic tie-up.  She’s headed for Hampton Roads and beyond.

The second and third are Bruce A. McAllister and 

Ava M, going to the Narrows to see someone about a ship

Next it was Brendan Turecamo assisting a Liberian-flagged tanker, Horizon Thetis.  If you want some interesting origin stories, check a mythology text about the relationship between Zeus and Thetis

Chemical Petrochemical Trader with Brownsville as the prime mover was next.

A while later Bruce A and 

and Ava M came in with their catch, Ever Far.  I’ll put up more photos of this new Ever F-class vessel later. 

And finally, it’s my first view ever of Centerline’s Rubia, ex-Denise A. Bouchard.  If you look closely, you can see Centerline’s lion on the stack. And the name Rubia . . . that’s Spanish for “blonde”… hmmm;  it looks more platinum to me.

All photos, January 4, 2022, WVD, who finds it interesting what cold, clear winter temperatures do to photos.

Why does time pass so quickly?!  As if it were just a few years ago, I recall this Wilmington NC stop on the road trip return from family in Georgia.   I was surprised by the amount of traffic in this Cape Fear River port, like Margaret McAllister here passing Corpus Christi with Petrochem Supplier. Margaret McAllister is one of McAllister’s ex-USN Natick-class tugs, in Margaret‘s case previously known as Tonkawa (YTB-786)

Kathryne E. McAllister (the 1980 one) followed the Margaret to sail a tanker. 

Kathryne E. is currently laid up, but Moran’s Cape Henry (That’s a popular name for tugboats;  I know of at least two others, one Kirby and one Vane.) below is still working, although currently in the Caribbean.

The first few days of January 2012 were as mild as those in 2022.  Here Ellen S. Bouchard heads west in the KVK pushing B. No. 282.  Ellen S. now wears Centerline’s lion logo.

Iron Mike might still wear Wittich Brothers black, blue and white, although I’ve not seen her out in the boro in a while. 

Atlantic Salvor passes in front of a quite changed Manhattan skyline, as seen from St. George.

Gramma Lee T. Moran has departed the sixth boro for Baltimore.  Southern Spirit is an active crude tanker  but she goes by Celsius Esbjerg, currently departing the Bohai Sea for the Yellow Sea.

A light Mckinley Sea heads west in the Kills.  She’s currently painted in Kirby colors, but laid up in Louisiana. Beyond her, Laura K Moran–now based in Savannah–assists tanker Mount Hope.

Marion Moran is out of the Moran fleet, and is likely wearing Dann Ocean livery, although I can’t confirm that.

The 1983 Sand Master was always a favorite of mine;  she was sold into the southern Caribbean, but she may be scrapped by now. 

Capt. Fred Bouchard was sold to a southern California construction company.

And we hold it up here, midmonth, with a vessel type I’ve not seen in a while . . . a livestock ship, Shorthorn Express, which had come into the Upper Bay for services, not to transfer cargo. The 1998 Luxembourg-flagged  Shorthorn Express is active, currently traveling between Israel and Portugal.  I used to see these regularly coming into the Kuwaiti port of Shuwaikh.  I also recall a horrendous sinking of a livestock ship heading for China back in 2020.

All photos, WVD, in January 2012.

I took these photos a bit over a week ago, and she’s already most of the way to the Gulf of Mexico.  I know that’s what ocean and coastwise transportation does and how it earns its money, but for some reason I’m still fascinated by this.

Assist was provided by Ruby M.

Chemical Transporter has capacity of 156,000 barrels.

 

The four US Shipping tugs–Brownsville, Corpus Christi, Galveston, and Freeport–are massive:  144′ x 46′ and powered by 12,000hp turning 13′ props . . . .

Can anyone tell me crew size?

All photos, WVD.

I realize that snow days occur here every year, even though not as frequently as they might farther north, but the movement of a squall across the boros rewards with interesting photos in spite of the cold.

At 0925 the other day, Maersk Edgar was in the clear although a squall concealed the lower Manhattan skyline.

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Here’s zoomed in closer because I hoped to confirm the unit to the left as Kirby’s Rebel, which I’ve not seen in ages. I hope I see her close up before she leaves town.

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Corpus Christi was clear.

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At 10:00 Weeks’ tugs Thomas and Shelby moved in to retrieve a crane as soon as they completed the salt pile job.  That’s Dreggen in the background. Nearly eight years ago Thomas and a crane were involved in a job that involved fishing out a certain geese-ingesting aircraft  from a forgiving North River.

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Red Hook moves a barge past a snow-cloaked IMTT.

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Emerald Coast heads out at 11:37.

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Peking appears from the edge of space.

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And here by noon, I was disappointed in my hopes to get a photo of Hyundai Pluto, entirely invisible beyond ACL Atlantic Cartier.  The port may have been closed around this time because Hyundai Pluto had arrived inside the Upper Bay, then spun around–not a lightly undertaken feat–and headed out to the Long Beach anchorage.  Atlantic Cartier anchored in Gravesend, and Atlantic Conveyer did the same off Stapleton, not a common occurrence for a containership.  Or maybe I just misunderstood what what going on, my perception beshrouded from myself.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

The sixth boro tidal strait typical known as the East River, surrounded as it is by impressive urbanity, is nonetheless a significant waterway.  These photos today come from Jonathan Steinman, as did these of Ginga Lion, a 507′ loa vessel.

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But Jonathan was surprised–as was I when I got his photos– to see ATB Freeport travel through the strait last week, even though New London, its destination, is closer by the “inside” route than by the alternative outside of Long Island, which it followed on the return.  The tape says the tug is 144′ loa and the barge–Chemical Transporter— is 521.’  While tug and barge are notched, the combined length of the units exceeds that of similar large units operated on this strait by Kirby, Bouchard, and Reinauer.  For what that’s worth.  Here’s some backstory on Freeport‘s costly construction.

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Thanks to Jonathan for these photos.

Given today’s date, the reference above to Lion, and the beautiful weather outside in NYC, I need to link to this lamb post from a year and a half ago.

To pick up where yesterday I ended . . . Chemical Transporter is not a ship.  Rather it’s the barge married to–or at least in a relationship with–ATB Freeport.

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This Workboat article makes clear the circuitous and costly ($91 million !@#@!) route this 150′ tug followed from keel lay to launch.

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I’d love to see the interior of this 2007 vessel.

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R. L. Enterkin is a tug I’ve seen on AIS for a long time, but the other day,

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I finally got a close-up as she went out to pick up a “tail job” at sunrise.

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At the head of the tow was Layla Renee.

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Click here for many posts I’ve done on Resolute.

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Thomas D. Witte–here passing off Wall Street– has carried many names since 1961.

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Zachery Reinauer was launched nearly a half century ago at Matton Shipyard . . . up above the Federal Lock in Troy and right across the river from the boyhood home of Herman Melville.

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Ellen . . . focus of countless tugster posts… as

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has Brendan Turecamo.

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HMS Justice–NOT this one–debuts on this blog with the photo below, which almost makes it appear she’s equipped with her very own drone…. but there must be an illusion happening there.

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And to close out this post . . . from M. McMorrow . . . the most intriguingly named tug of all . . . Tug of War.

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The last photo from Mike and Michelle McMorrow, who’ve contributed photos here before.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

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