You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Huron Service’ tag.

More of the Great Race soon . . . but a bit of back story.

When I moved to our fair metropolis in 2000 and started paying attention, I was taken by the Bayonne Bridge, so enamored in fact that I choose it as the header image for this blog in 2006, and now out of stubbornness– or something– have kept the old view.

I renewed my focus on the Bridge in 2011, “turning” became the key word in the titles.  Click here to see posts I did for its 80th, 84th, and 86th anniversary of initial construction, and here I marked the 80 mark again twice.   Over 10 years ago I alluded to the raising for the first time here.

Here’s a single post that looks at the change from 2011 until 2017.

For a baseline, let’s use sunrise April 24, 2008, looking from the west, those two boats are Justine McAllister and Huron Service, now Genesis Victory.

And from the east, December 2011, and that boat was Barents Sea, currently known as Atlantic Enterprise.   As to the bridge, note the box-grid work (not a technical term) on the Bayonne side of the arch.

From Richmond Terrace (Staten Island) perspective, here’s the bridge in February 2012.

By September 13, the box grid was covered, possibly to allow sand blasting.

By January 2014, the cover was off the box grid.  Yes, that’s Specialist.

By October 2015, the box grid was being extended upward, as

the vertical supports were being erected farther into Bayonne.

Here’s a December 15 view, showing the symmetry of the construction.

Here’s March 2016, and you can begin to see the location of the raised roadbed.

Here’s a view from May 2016 from the west side of the Bayonne shore.

By August 2016, the new span has been completely defined.

Here’s a closer up, showing the old level–still poet traffic–and the new level, along with the device used to place pre-cast portions of the new road bed.   The tug is Taft Beach.

Here, as seen from the west side, is most of the bridge in September 2016.  Note the gap still remaining on the Staten Island side.

By March 23,  2017, the upper deck was open to wheeled traffic, and the lower deck was ready to be dismantled.

Here’s a closer-up of that opening.

By April 2, a gap existed, and

by April 11, 2017, ships that might have scrapped  year before were shooting through the opening that grew wider by the week.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will continue this progression soon.

This might be the “newest-named” boat in the harbor, although you’ve seen Genesis Victory here before as Huron Service both with blue trim and orange.

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Laura K Moran first appeared on this blog back in 2008 here, as the sixth boro’s newbie.

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I’m not sure the story here, but Laura K holds station off the stern of MSC Sariska, who still has the hook down.

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Brian Nicholas and Evening Mist head out on assignment.

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Here’s an entire post I devoted to Brian Nicholas over four years ago.

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For a frontal view of Evening Mist, click here and scroll.

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Here Miriam Moran escorts Hoegh Inchon.  ROROs’ cargo is quantified not in teus, but ceus, and Inchon is a 21-year-old floating parking lot with 4300-car equivalent capacity.

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Maryland and Franklin Reinauer meet, with missions taking them in opposite directions.

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And with Red Hook we end.

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Happy springtime, like it was in the photo below, showing Huron Service about seven LONG years ago.

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All photos taken in the real maricentric sixth boro by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  The post about the documentary Graves of Arthur Kill seems to be getting a lot of attention the past few days.  Gary Kane and I can always figure out a time when one or both of us could do a screening for a group you put together.

 

Huron Service (1981) sailed into the springy morning it was.

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Chesapeake Coast (2012) lit up the dawn this morning.

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McAllister Responder (1967) and Gage Paul Thornton  (1944)  met in the KVK last Saturday.    Click here for Gage Paul‘s long history, during one part of which she carried the name Elizabeth McAllister.

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Joyce D. Brown (2002) passes Stolt Jade.

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HMS Liberty (1978)  . . .was originally a freshwater tug, one of two operating in the sixth boro for Harley, a company mostly based on the west coast but expanding.

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Houma (1970) like many of the vessels in this post, has operated under a long list of companies.

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Gulf Coast (1982) enters the KVK from the east this morning before 9 a.m.

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A parting shot of the vessel that started today’s post . . .  Huron Service, headed to refuel.

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All photos taken the last few days by Will Van Dorp.

I took these fotos Friday before the winds started.

Viking . .  . . To see how she’s evolved over the past 41 years, click here.

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Brooklyn was previously a fleetmate of Viking.  For her history, click here.

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Above and below . . . it’s Huron Service, which recently got new paint as well.  Here’s an overview–possibly out of date–of routes served by Genesis Energy.

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Clearly, from the foto, to say commerce USED to happen on the Gowanus Canal . . . uses the wrong verb tense.   Here, from L to R, it’s Shawn Miller, Samantha Miller, Miss Ayva, and Diane B.

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Finally, and still in Gowanus Bay, it’s Discovery Coast and

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Potomac and Hunting Creek.

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Stay inside or at least firmly attached to something substantial.

All fotos here from yesterday . ..

Liberty Service as you may never have seen her.  Here (third foto in this link) she was four years ago.

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Ditto Huron Service.  Repainting on Huron seems farther along than that on Liberty.   Here’s how Huron Service looked a year and a half ago.   Get ready for Genesis Energy. 

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In the past year, this Pegasus has sprouted an upper wheelhouse;  compare with here.

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Welcome to the waters around Houston.  Well . ..  I do mean the 118,000-barrel barge married to Linda Moran.  Uh . . . do tugs and barges ever get divorced?

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Trucks on the water pushed by Shawn Miller.

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I realized only later that–had my conveyance lingered here–I would have seen Catherine C. Miller push past with FIVE trailers/tractors on a barge.  See her in the distance there beyond the bow of  RTC 83.

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Reinauer Twins waits alongside RTC 104 with a faux lighthouse in the background.

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Lucy Reinauer–earlier Texaco Diesel Chief built in Oyster Bay NY–is the push behind RTC 83.

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DBL 29 pushed (ok, will. . .  open eyes.  thanks for the correction.)  moved alongside by Taurus.  See some of my previous Taurus fotos here and here.

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And thanks to wide-eyed bowsprite, a vessel I’ve not seen before pushing stone.  It’s Patricia.  She reminds me of a vessel I spotted along the road a few years back . . . Hoss.

So, this is the “plus” in the title, the group-sourcing request portion of this post:  what company is operating Patricia?

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And another question . . . from an eagle-eyed upriver captain.  Notice the weather instruments on this channel marker just off Bannerman’s Island (I am planning to do another post on this unique location north of West Point.) And . . .

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here are more weather instruments on this federally-maintained channel marker off the Rondout.  Questions:  who’s responsible for these and is there a website where  the data collected can be monitored?

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp, except for the last three, which come from bowsprite and Capt. Thalassa.

Speaking of bowsprite, today she’s running Radio Lilac and I’ll be there tending bar.  Here’s something of the inspiration.  Come on by if you have the time.  Teleport in if you’re otherwise out of range.

As I drank coffee this morning and read Kennebeckcaptain’s article on ATBs, sunrise colors warmed the color of the drab brick building across the way;  stoking the color did nothing for the 18-degree temperatures.  Time for a walk, I thought, wondering what I’d see.  Bright color, fresh

paint?  New steel and welds?  After all the pleasure I’d had watching the final days of construction as documented by the fine folks at Narrangansett Bay Shipping, my first glimpse happened here of Laurie Ann Reinauer!  As Don S calls it, it’s facet tug!

And she was not alone among ATBs:  tailing her was Patriot Service,

a very different-looking tug than –say–Meagan Ann.   By the way, see Meagan Ann in “push contest” video here v. Nathan E. Stewart.  (starts at 40 seconds in).

And then Huron Service.  That’s Irving Oil’s Great Eastern with yellow stack in background.

Laurie Ann made a U-turn somewhere off St, George and headed back west, allowing

a twice over and

a third and

–I was practically leering by now.

But it seemed like a parade, so I felt excused.  That’s Houma approaching on the left and a noisy Captain D with the parade to Laurie Ann‘s port.

All fotos taken this morning by Will Van Dorp.  Blizzard  (yeah, right) here tomorrow.

Not an ITB in sight.    On site here.

And for a little perspective, Kennebeck (and gCaptain)’s  post on Sea Reliance and its barge deals with a tug of more than twice Laurie Ann‘s bhp of 4000,  and a barge with 155,000 barrel capacity v. Laurie Ann‘s barge (which I haven’t seen yet) of 80,000.

Someone I care about expressed delight in seeing Hornbeck boats.  “They’re pretty, beautiful white and orange,”  I recall a statement.  Well, I have news for you:  they’re Candies.  What? are Candies?  Well, many of them are ex-Candies, at least.  That’s Otto Candies, LLC, Marine Transportation and Towing.

Like Patriot Service, ex-Sean Candies.   From a distance, I imagined the black stack-fronts as darkened windows.  Guess the total horsepower.

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114′ loa and launched in 1996.

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Spartan Service . .  new to boro6 this summer?  Formerly Domar Captain.

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Redundant radars?  Spartan is 101′ loa and launched in 1978.

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Huron Service, ex-Eric Candies.  Left to right in background:  Zachery Reinauer and Baltic Sea.  I first wrote about Huron here over a year ago.

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Left to right here in Gowanus Bay:  Huron Service 98′ loa and from 1981, Sea Service 104′ and 1975, and Atlantic Service 100′ and also 1975.  Bridge in the background is the BQE.

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Here’s Sea Service over at the Palisades anchorage . . . or is it called Yonkers anchorage.

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Erie Service, ex-Brett Candies 98′ and 1981.

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And here’s Michigan Service, ex-Kevin Candies 980 and 1981; along with Erie.  Now given these names, you know there has to be a Superior Service.  I’ve just never seen it.  Maybe it operates elsewhere.  Here’s the Hornbeck site.

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When I saw the colors here, I thought it was a Candies boat operating as a Candies boat in boro6.  Wrong.  It’s Sandmaster of Amboy Aggregates.  Oh, it’s ex-Ben Candies, 107′ and 1983.

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Answer to Patriot Service hp:  6140.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Again, click on a foto to enlarge it . . . at least, it does so on my machine.

Can you rank these tugs by horsepower high to low?  All foto’d since the start of October:  Barney Turecamo, pushing oil;

Meredith C., moving Jersey City westward in push gear;

Huron Service, pushing oil on a fall foliage tour;

Amy C., out to pick up some exciting foreign ship;

Dolphin, basking in the graving dock.  All fotos but one by Will Van Dorp.  The other is by Blake, age 7.  Guess which?

Vitals:  Barney, 5100hp.  Meredith C, 7200hp.  Huron Service, 3620hp?,

Amy C, 4000hp.  Dolphin, 4300hp.

Dolphin was snapped by Blake during OpenHouseNewYork.  Bravo!

First,  Happy Hudson Day . . . that’s why some folk don’t work today.

Update on Walrus:  Thanks to Gijs… Walrus stopped here for four days on its way to exercises with a Dutch frigate De Zeven Provinciën and the USS Dallas. Walrus then heads for Norfolk, end of October.  Info here.

Although the coexistence thread has languished, it retains its critical importance.  All denizens of the boro strive to avoid doing harm one to the other.  In the foto below, find two tugs (Evening Tide and Huron Service), three bridges, and then two unnamed kayaks, one sloop, and one powerboat.

Since time immemorial, movement here has resulted from human

power.

As part of Riverkeeper‘s Water Fest, eleven rafts–down from the Adirondacks–floated about a hundred lucky folks from 79th Street to North Cove.

Meanwhile, USS Nassau was in town for the commemoration of the century since the voyage of the “great white fleet.”  Thanks to Jed for the identification.

USS Nassau foto from the cliffs comes compliments of bowsprite–who is depicted somewhere in this post.  All others, Will Van Dorp, not depicted.

Hornbeck has a relatively new tug; this morning I got a closeup.

Well, it’s a make-over. A retrofit, you’ll learn if you scroll through the link.

I haven’t found any fotos of Huron Service as Eric Candies, then named for a Louisiana tugboat captain.

Here’s Huron Service lightering Indigo Point off Stapleton, Staten Island.

I’d welcome fotos of Eric Candies, the vessel or the mariner.

Now imagine tug Grouper retrofitted with azipods or VSP and an upper wheelhouse at the top of a giraffe neck, 1912 meets 2012.

Photos, WVD.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

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