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It turns out, I’ve done a post like this once before . . .  in 2012 here.  When I took the next two photos on Tuesday, I’d thought all the fleet week vessels had already departed.  Well, wrong . . . there went LHD-3 USS Kearsarge . . .

which reminded me this would be

a good time to use a photo by a jolly tar back about 10 years ago.  Notice the long-gone, long transformed Odin bunkering LHD-3….

Mid afternoon Tuesday this was a sight to behold along the East River, here approaching the Williamsburg Bridge . . . whatzit?

It’s another of the fleet leaving town . . . USNS Yuma (T-EPF-8).  The photo above and next two come from an alert Tony A doing his commerce on the East River.  In the photo below, it’s the green-fronted UN Building along with river with Trump Tower (dark) rising behind it.

When I caught notice of this, I thought I could hurry to Fort Wadsworth to catch photos of Yuma with Manhattan behind it, but my underestimation of  EPF’s speed and the coincidence of hitting every stoplight on Bay Terrace meant that when I got to the Fort,

Yuma was already making almost two dozen knots and headed for Norfolk, a trip that took less than 24 hours.

The EFTs are a further evolution of the HSTs, which I posted about here. By the way, Alakai was renamed USNS Puerto Rico, but then later that name was removed, since there’s a new EFT with the name USNS Puerto Rico in the offing.   So is the former Alakai now nameless?

Many thanks to Tony A for sending along the East River photos. Thanks to JED for the Odin/USS Kearsarge shot, and all the others by Will Van Dorp.

Happy June!

It’s not just mea culpa.  I’ve done it, you have too, most likely.  “What?” you ask?  I’ll get to that.

Foreshortening does make for dramatic photos.  And that looks like a spare prop high up on the port side deck.

Watch out there, Madame Mallard . . .

What would Captain Ahab make of this profile?  Onyx Arrow was in port for less than a half day yesterday, arriving from Halifax and Europe before that.  Early afternoon I got these photos of her leaving town…

So this “we’re all at fault” title in Latin above?   We’ve all hit animals while driving:  birds, bats, other folks’ pets, turtles . . .  I’ve never hit a deer, but over a million are hit on US highways each year . . . .

Here’s what I’m getting at . . . see it on the bulbous bow?  Here’s more info on ship strikes . . .

It’s sad to see . . . like deer along the highway, but mitigation seems not so easy.  I know of a sailboat sailing with no engine running that hit one that may have been asleep on the surface . . .  middle of the night.

The last two photos come thanks to the always alert Tony A;  the others by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’m off gallivanting around NYC and getting more Fleet Week photos, so I’m happy to put up some more of John Jedrlinic’s photos.

Let’s start with an unusual angle . . . it’s Smit Indusbank, built 1968 in the Netherlands.

photo date 22 APRIL 2016

Pelican II seems to have started life on the Vistula River, upstream from Gdansk, in 1993.  Now it’s working in Barbados.

photo date 24 APRIL 2016

Uraga Maru, 2005, has always worked in Japan and is currently in the Tokyo area.

photo date 14 JAN 2008

St Lucaya, 1991, with that bow (visible better here)  you’d never mistake her for a vessel built in North America or Europe…  The same is true of Smit Tahiti, again, better visible here.

photo date 24 APRIL 2016

And finally, Midnight Chief is a small RORO  that would be right at home in San Juan PR harbor, where Midnight Coast could be a twin.

photo date 28 APRIL 2016

 

Thanks to Jed, who always comes up with the unusual and obscure,  for these photos.

 

Enterprise seems a great title for a post on National Maritime Day, but here’s a question answered at the end of this post:  Why–other than the 1933 proclamation by Congress–is May 22 chosen for this day?  Answer at the end of this post.

Jake van Reenen took these photos yesterday in Clayton, NY.  The title evokes my Salvor post from eight plus years ago.

Atlantic Enterprise and crane barge are headed to the sixth boro, still many sea miles ahead.

Jarrett M assists with the tow, a role it played about a month upstream through the same waters here.

 

 

I’m eager to see this Salvor twin back in the sixth boro.

This post from nearly 10 years ago features my first view of this vessel–then called Barents Sea–under way.

Many thanks to Jake for these photos.  If all goes as planned, Enterprise will arrive here in less than two weeks.  Eyes peeled?

So, May 22 . . . it’s National Maritime Day because of Savannah, that’s SS Savannah, she who began the first Atlantic crossing on this date under steam power 199 years ago . . . well, at least steam powered her wheels for a little over 10% of the trip, but you need to start somewhere, eh?  And this fact is alluded to in the 1933 proclamation, as well as in the 2017 proclamation.

 

Click on the photo to get the source of the photo and the story of her short life.  And the 199 years ago, that just begs for some sort of memorializing in 2018…

Did Hurricane Sandy unearth SS Savannah wreckage?  Read here.

 

Here from Lock E-28A, Bob Stopper’s photo of Canal Corp’s efforts to get the Canal open for season 200!

The rest of these photos come from Jan van der Doe, starting with Sandra Mary, 1962,  in McNally colors and built by Russel-Hipwell at Owen Sound in 1962.

W. N. Twolan, also 1962 built, alongside Menier Consol.

At the end and off the stern of W. N. Twolan, it’s the last side-wheeler ferry to operate on the Great Lakes, PS Trillium, launched in 1910.  To see Trillium after a 1975 refit, click here.

In what I first thought was an unusual military dazzle pattern is actually a 1966 Davie Shipbuilding former cargo vessel that’s been reborn as a floating dry dock.  Click here for Menier Consol transporting pulpwood. 

Last but not least, it’s William Rest, 1961.  Toronto Dry Dock is one of so many places I need to visit.

Many thanks to Bob and Jan for these photos.

Here are previous posts with this title.  Another unusual cargo that passed through here were these barged US, British, and Russian jets five years ago also in May.

I owe all these shots to Mike Pelletier and other folks who were at E2 in Waterford yesterday, as the Erie Canal opened for its 200th consecutive season.  It’s cause for celebration that Day 1 brings significant commercial cargo into the Canal.

The job will entail moving a total of 12 identical tanks from the Hudson River level to the Rochester level. At the end of this post, I share a photo I took at the Rochester area a few years ago in the fall.  Can you imagine what that part of the Canal looks like?  But I digress.

If you don’t know the story, let me highlight some details, although you can read more here.  The cargo here consists of three tanks, each 20′ x 60′ and fabricated of stainless steel.  If each tank holds 2000 barrels, or 661,000 cans, and if I drink an average of two six-packs a month, one tank holds a 4,500 year supply of Genesee for me….  Another way to think of it . . . if a party was held and each guest had three beers, all twelve tanks would contain enough beer for 2,644,000 guests!  That would be enough beer @ two or three beers each for every 21+ person in Wyoming, Vermont, North Dakota, and Alaska . .  and quite a bit more left over.  But I’ve really digressed.

Here the tow lies alongside the wall below E2. #Toast the tanks is the tag Genesee wishes “social media makers” to use to group-document this journey.

Here CMT Otter pushes the tow into the opened lower gates of E2.  Here is a previous post featuring Otter and fleet mates.

So, here the tow is inside and the lower gates closed. The shot above was shot from midpoint on the catwalk over the gates beyond the stern of the tug.   The lock chamber valves are now set to fill. The two crew lower photo are radioing distances to the captain.

 

Now the camera is back to that same catwalk.  What else do you see?   I missed it the first times I looked at this photo….

See the drone?  It’s between the catwalk rail and the portside stern of CMT Otter.  I’m guessing this is CMT’s camera team.

Believe it or not, this is the Canal through which these tanks will travel near the end of their journey to Gates . . . Rochester, beyond E33.   From the Canal, Rochester is mostly invisible.

Now some speculation . . . I believe the tanks arrived in the US aboard Wladyslaw Orkan on a voyage that began in Shanghai around March 13.  My guess would be that the manufacturer is Lehui, possibly in Xiangshan Ningbo.  If all this is true, I’m curious about this stated goal on the Lehui site:  “During a two-decade-plus journey, Lehui exercises “European Quality, Chinese Price” philosophy, which won Lehui “the most outstanding beer/beverage equipment manufacturer” in China.”  Where were previous Genesee tanks fabricated?  With concerted several decades effort, a 21st century plan to return more manufacturing to the US might be held on course with a mantra something like ““European Quality, Chinese Price, US Essence, ”    . . . concerted effort . . .

Click here to see the tentative schedule.

Thanks again to Mike Pelletier.

 

First, thanks to Peter Eagleton, Philip T Feeney in the 1970s.  I haven’t the heart to go see her in her current condition.

Next, Miss Ila, resplendent as a springtime cardinal!

Haggerty Girls nudging RTC 107 out of the Kills,

 

Helen Laraway passing TS Kennedy over by ConHook,

James William leaving Mister Jim over by the scows,

James E. Brown taking some rail cars past a wall of containers . . .

and finally . . . is that Durham setting up Willy Wall?  Is that what it’s still called?

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, except that first one supplied by Peter, whom I thank.

Thanks to Erich Amberger for these photos up near Mechanicville.  According to Erich, this could be the first boat on the canal this season.

Lock C-2?

 

And it’s the mighty Betty D, which I’ve caught here only once.

One of my goals for this summer is to travel the Champlain.

 

Many thanks to Erich for whetting my appetite.

 

Thanks to Tony A, whose previous contributions can be found here, here’s an insider’s view of a scrap ferrous metal run, starting with a view across the deep “hold” of the scow as it exits the Buttermilk heading for whichever of the sixth boro’s creeks has the product.

Once loaded, the scow is brought ship side.

Note the multiple load marks . . .

As the crane transfers the scrap into the hold of the ship, the tug may move to a safe distance or do another run.  By tomorrow, bulker Nichirin will be arriving in Iskenderun, Turkey, 15 miles from the Syrian border and less than 30 from Aleppo.

Photos I’ve taken over the years of scrap metals runs include these of Crow, in blue and

in red.

And here I think it’s Sarah Ann doing a really efficient run.

Thanks to Tony for the top four photos.  The bottom three are by Will Van Dorp.

And come to think of it, I wonder if the late great Crow has ended up in Iskenderun also….

 

I’ve posted photos like this one of Thomas D. Witte moving recycling, but I’ve never

been inside Pratt Industries plant on the Arthur Kill.  Recently, William Hyman has though, and he’s shared his photos here.  It looks –and probably smells–like any waste handling facility, but

giant claws move the scrap around and

caldrons do their magic and

cardboard stock comes out.

Photos I’ve taken of the recycling barges back almost 10 years ago are below.

 

Unless otherwise identified, all photos by Will Van Dorp. William Hyman’s previous photos can be found here.  Thank you, sir.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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