You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘collaboration’ category.

Type the word training into the search window to the left on this page and you’ll get a variety of posts, as here.  And truth be told, many other options exist for summer training and sea time for ocean academy students;  I met cadets from at least three on my “go west” trip.  Yesterday David Silver got me advance notice of when this training ship would leave port;  thanks to him, I got these photos.

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Kimberly Turecamo assisted, as did Julia Miller and Amy C McAllister.

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By 1230 Friday, she was west of the Brooklyn Bridge and headed for sea,

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for Maine, and by

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this posting, she’s already east of Cape Cod.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Click here to watch David Silver’s 20-minute video of her departure from pier side.

 

Let’s pick it up in Toledo, OH and the century-old GL tug Mississippi.

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“Dieselized” 41 years after its launch, it still steers with a brass tiller in the wheelhouse, as demonstrated here by Captain Stabler.

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Keep good paint and in repair, and a 1929 tug like  Nebraska still has lots of life left.  Compare that boat to its terrestrial counterpart, a 1929 Mack truck.

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Mighty John III is a 1962 tugboat. The bands in the water distinguish sunlight from shadow in the Maumee silt water.

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Sea Eagle II is Louisiana built but now flagged Edmonton, AB.

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Pioneerland dates from 1943.

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Titan, here in the River Rouge, dates from 1940.

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Sheila Kaye is 65′ loa built in 1943.  Was it originally a government boat?

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Here in the St. Clair River is a small unit about which I know nothing.  That’s Canada on the far bank.

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Karen Andrie dates from 1965.

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And finally, from my sister in Frankfort MI, it’s the 1956 Kurt R. Luedtke.

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The last photo comes from my sister;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Many thanks to Wade P. Streeter for his help in getting these first photos of M/V Hon. James L. Oberstar from public locations along the River Rouge.

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Here she squeezes ever so slowly through the open Dix Street Bridge, showing her multiple builders plates and

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flower boxes abaft her house.

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Then she headed into the turning basin to offload her ore in the late afternoon.

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Before mid-morning the following day, she was light and ready to race back to Superior for her next cargo.

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She followed us for a bit before

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overtaking us and showing her stern on her way into Lake St. Clair and places north.

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More on the other vessels here later.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are more photos from Aleksandr, taken on a canal between Middelburg and Vlissingen.    Ruurtje tows while

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F-50 takes the stern as they move

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the aluminum superstructure of a future Damen-built patrol craft on barge Risico 11.

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Click here for another view of the tow.   Click here for a view of the Damen yard there.

This series handles my miscellaneous needs with updates, follow-ups, and oddments.

Let’s start with the mage below.  Click on it and you’ll learn how soon a sixth boro GUP vessel transforms into dive attraction named Lady Luck.  Thanks to Mike Hatami for passing along this info.

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If the image below looks like a boat, it is, or it was before San Francisco grew (or tumbled?)  over top of it.  For more info on the buried vessels of SF, click on the image.  Here’s more.

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Below, well that was me about 10 years ago.  After I had built a skin-on-frame kayak, I need to paint the porous “skin” with urethane, hence the respirator.  If anyone’s interested in buying me a token of appreciation to update this vessel–which I still have–click on the image to see my one-item wish list.  And thanks in advance.

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More old business . . . the photo below I took from the Manhattan side of the East River about 10 years ago, and

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this photo was taken by Robert Silva back in September 2014; of course this was what remained of the John B. Caddell after Hurricane Sandy, the suspense,  and the subsequent auction.

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By now, that old steel may have seen the hold of a scrapper like Atlantic Pearl . . . and been transformed in the heat

And finally, in response to a recent comment asking about Gateway tugs . . . the rest of the photos/text here I took/wrote in April 2014 and never posted because I was waiting for some additional info.

“What’s under the ‘white house’ here?

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Click here to find out.   And the tug C. Angelo is resplendent in the brightening daylight.

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So this is future defense works passing obsolete defense works.”

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C. Angelo in drydock?

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All photos except the top three and the one by Robert Silva . . .  by Will Van Dorp.

The first six photo here comes from Jonathan Steinman, taken on June 13.  The Donjon tugs has delivered Chesapeake 1000 to a point just off Rockefeller University’s campus to prepare for lifting prefabricated modules for Rockefeller’s River Campus.

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Step one for Donjon is to secure the gargantuan crane.

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Then Atlantic Salvor moves into place to

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receive the massive anchors, a job that Salvor may be IS uniquely qualified to perform.

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The yellow lighted buoys mark the anchors’ positions.

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By the time I got there on June 17, sans camera other than phone, several of the modules had already been lifted from the waterborne transport into the locations where they’ll stay for a very long time.  See time lapse of the installation of modules 1 and 2 on youtube here.

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A dozen more modules will still be lifted when

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water, tidal, and atmospheric conditions allow.

Click here for more information of the River Campus project, one of many construction sights to behold along the East over.  A calendar of additional lifting can be found here, subject to change.

And many thanks to Jonathan for use of his photos and information about the project.  Next time, I’ll bring my good camera.

Previous sights to behold there can be found here.

And while we’re on the topic of heavy equipment, here’s a vimeo update of of invisible gold project happening off Block Island.  I want to get back there soon.

 

 

I started a series called transitioning, but here’s something new.  Actually I did a transit post a few years back when a Boston ex-fireboat transited the sixth boro on its way to  Lake Huron to reinvent as a dive boat.

This post started with Glenn Raymo catching a shot of NOAA 5503 northbound in Poughkeepsie.

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Then, unprompted, Mike Pelletier, engineer of Urger noticed it between locks 2 and 3 in Waterford, westbound.  When I noticed it on AIS, southbound on the Welland, I knew she was doing a long haul.  So here’s what I’ve since learned:  this vessel “was transferred to NOAA from the CG in Fort Macon NC.  Its final destination is Muskegon MI,  where it will undergo a full overhaul and be refit for service as a research vessel on the Great Lakes.”   Many thanks to Glenn, Mike, and my other sources.

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But if NOAA is transiting far, Sand Master is going much much farther.  Any ideas what HN RTB is?

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Here’s a photo of Sand Master I got just over a month ago at the Great Lake just west of the Bayonne Bridge.

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Try Roatán, Honduras.

Thanks all for the photos and the information.  And please help keep eyes open for unique transiting vessels and those who work mostly here.

Barrel comes up with unusual photos . . . and this one below,  Merritt,  shows a side-cast dredge with a draft of less than 5′.

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It appears she’s still in use.

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Here’s the info.

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I wish that tree was not obscuring the tug, but the real star here is the ship, an oddity that began life in the last years of the nineteenth century as a battleship, BB-5.   The first in her class was USS Indiana, BB-1. 

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After 20 years as a battleship, she was idled for 20 years, at which point she was converted into arcane ship, Crane Ship No. 1, with lifting capacity of 250 tons, a weight more impressive then than now.  It does qualify this as a “second lives” post, though.  Finally, in 1955, she was sold as scrap.

bb2USS Kearsarge FORMER BATTLE AHIP CONVERTE4D TO CRANE SHIP PHILA NAVY YARD 1923

Click here for navsource’s great photo documentation–including the dramatic graving dock view below– of her entire half century career.

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Here’s a 1936 derrick boat, with a sign over the stern house that would get my attention.

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I’m not sure when she went out of service.

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Many thanks to barrel for these glimpses into the archives.

Given the history and range of projects of Elsbeth II, you might imagine how thrilled I was to see her for the first time yesterday.  And she has to be among a small set of working vessels based in North America with brightwork!  She truly fits under the category exotic.

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I saw this tugboat six years ago in the Delaware River, but Sarah D looks spanking new  in NYS Marine Highway colors.

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Happy flag day.  Do you know the significance of this date?

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OSG Courageous, she’s one large tugboat and an infrequent

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visitor in this port.  I can’t quite make out the barge name. Of course, she’s not as colossal as her big sister –OSG Vision–who spent some time here . . . four (!!) years ago.

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Sassafras is a fixture in the sixth boro, but she rarely looks as good as she does when many shore dwellers in the other boros are just waking up.  Here she

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lies alongside Petali Lady.

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Mister Jim here is lightering (?) bulker Antigoni B, who seems to have since headed upriver.

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And since this is called random tugs, let me throw in two photos from the Digital collections of the New york State archives . . . SS Brazil entering the sixth boro on May 31, 1951.  What the photo makes very clear to me is how much traffic in the harbor has changed in 65 years.   Can anyone identify the six tugboats from at least three different companies here?  I can’t.

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Here the party passes a quite different looking Governors Island.

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All photos except for the last two by Will Van Dorp.  These last two come from a treasure trove aka Digital Collections of the New York State Archives. 

Unrelated:  If you’re free Saturday, it’s the annual mermaid migration on Coney Island.

 

I’ve often posted photos of ROROs and PCTCs, but here’s the old school.  Here’s a Ford ship loading Ford cars from the Chester PA plant.  MV Lake Benbow was one of the first six Ford-owned vessels transporting Ford products around the world.  Click here for her interesting history:  built 1918 for the US Naval Overseas Transport Service (NOTS), purchased by Ford in 1925, which operated it until 1937.  Given the automobiles awaiting loading, maybe 1935 Fords, this photo appears to have been taken near the end of its time as a Ford vessel.

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The Chester plant made Fords from 1927 until 1958.  Click here for more photos and info on the Chester plant.  When that plant closed, operations moved to Mahwah NJ, where after some years, the same script was followed. 

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Click here for Ford production location photos both vintage and abroad.

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Ford was know to have tried to own all aspects of their operation, from the Fordlandia gambit to northern forests and mines, but other companies like US Steel, Bethlehem, fruit companies and petroleum companies did the same.   By the way, now that it’s summer BBQ season, do you know the connection between Ford and Kingsford charcoal?

 

Again, thanks to barrel for these photos.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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