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Fire off the free foton fireworks!

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For 3286 times before today I’ve posted since

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November 26, 2006.  My very first post was here.  In the big scheme of things, 10 years is a short time, yet I have seen a fair amount of change in my beat–the sixth boro–in that time, particularly shore features, bridges, and some of the actual vessels afloat.  I certainly have learned a lot since 2006.

It does take some time every day, and I’ve thought to discontinue many times . . .

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but I continue.  Thank you all for reading, commenting, correcting my errors and typos, answering my questions, suggesting ideas, sending along photos, offering me jobs, giving me work, inviting me to stuff, indulging my made-up words, recognized me, alerting me of events to shoot, unlocking doors, sending me gifts, buying me elixirs, sharing company, entrusting me with secrets, keeping me off the partisan shoals on FB, and generally being friendly.  You all have kept me going, have convinced me all this needs to be documented, and therefore, I’ve put at least 25,000 photos into the public domain.

Digital cameras make this documentation easy and the internet lowers the cost.  So I hope you continue to read the blog, respond, send along photos, and more.  If the photo enlarges well and it fits, I’ll use it, crediting you by name or pseudonym.  (Cell phone photos do not often work, unfortunately.)  The boro is complex, perspectives infinite, and the “gallivants beyond”  just plain innumerable.

Will I keep it up for another 10 years?  Who knows whether anyone will be alive next year . . . although I hope we’ll be.

Again, I am humbled and thank you.

Here was post 1000.

Here are anniversary posts from select previous years:  2008     2010    2011   2012   2014   2015

 

Here’s a short but motley set of photos.  Can you identify the tug below sporting the Canadian flag?  Answer follows.

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Below it’s Barry Silverton, pushing Fight ALS eastbound on the East River.   Big Allis identifies the location, where Don Jon folks/equipment have recently placed the platforms to the lower right side of the photo.

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And finally, from the Port of Toronto, it’s Mr. Kane, who first appeared on this blog here, although it is not identified except in the comments thanks to Isaac Pennock.

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So the top photo, it’s Cheyenne, quite possibly the last vessel to traverse the Erie Canal this season.  I’m not sure if they have already reached the Hudson River.  She’s flying the Canadian courtesy flag because she had just exited the Welland Canal at Port Weller at that time.  Here’s a photo taken by fire girl two seasons ago, Cheyenne doing the part of the Canal at the east end of Sylvan Beach.

Thanks much to George Haynes, Jonathan Steinman, and Jan van der Doe for these photos.

Happy Thanksgiving to all.  Thanks much for continuing to read tugster.  If there’s interest in the proposal below, I’ll try to fashion a post from your contributions soon if not tomorrow.

Proposal:  If you are working [today] Thursday and therefore having lunch and/or dinner at work–whether on a vessel or in any other work setting–and you choose to take a photo of the dinner–any aspect of the meal–and send it to me, please do and I’ll try to devise a post with it on Friday this week.  Thanks for the consideration.

You may remember the Sojourn story here, about a Belgian freight barge that the original owner and builder sold, lost track of, and then rediscovered in upstate New York?  Here was how she arrived in upstate NY.

Well, after two years of work, she’s under way–just ahead of winter storm Argos.  These photos were taken yesterday (Thursday) by Bob Stopper up in Lyons, NY.  Below, Sojourn is easing not Lock 28A,

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heading for Lock 27, and

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and out of the canal before it closes, draw-down takes place, and ice invades.

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Calling all eastern Erie Canal watchers and Hudson River photographers, here’s Bob’s short background to the vessel:

“First arrived in Lyons on November 12, 2013 . The boat was built in 1963 and originally used as a coal and materials barge. It was used for over 40 years by the same family, but eventually because of family illness, the barge was sold. The barge was purchased by Paula Meehan, founder of Redken Cosmetics, renamed the Sojourn, and converted in 2006  to a Hotel Barge and used for high style cruises in France. Ms Redken shipped the barge via freighter to America with the intention of cruising American waters, especially the Erie Canal. Unfortunately, Ms Redkin died in 2014, and the barge returned to the Lyons Dydock on October 15, 2014. It sat  in the Lyons Drydock and began to deteriorate  until purchased by a young hi-tech  internet entrepreneur from the state of Washington. The newly renovated barge, 126′ x 18′,  left Lyons on November 17 headed for its new home in the NYC Harbor.”

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All photos by Bob Stopper.

You may recall that my connection with Lyons is that it’s the county seat of the county where I grew up.  It’s also the county where Grouper languishes, about to freeze into another canal winter.

 

Over six years ago, I posted with a title this one mimics.  Richard Dixon is to the left, clearly USCG white, indicating its primary mission.  My question is what color is the larger vessel to the right?

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Maybe you can guess more about this vessel below.  The photo comes from a secret salt from a small Caribbean port I will also leave nameless.

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So the unidentified patrol vessel is the P-840 Holland, 355′ offshore patrol vessel for the Royal Netherlands Navy.   The design is intended to minimize radar visibility, but the color is also a blue gray said to camouflage it on the horizon better than gray.

Contrasting with that blue, check out the gray of LHD 7, USS Iwo Jima, which arrived in the sixth boro a few days ago in honor of Veterans Day.

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Top three photos come thanks to Capt. Nemo.  The fourth was taken by Will Van Dorp.

For more gray, click here.

 

 

Leaden skies cover my sixth boro today, a dour sign leading me to the Gmelin collection and the grim discovery that well over a third of the photos of shipping represented in his photos from the 1930s by a decade later were sunk or scuttled as fanaticism drew the world into war.  Take this photo taken in 1931.  To situate the photo in the sixth boro, note the Stevens Mansion–demolished in 1959– just above the stern of the ship.  Nerissa was launched in Scotland in 1926, ran between NYC–St. Johns NF until 1931, when she ran between NYC and the Caribbean.  Her end came in 1941, when she was torpedoed off Ireland by U-552, on her 40th crossing with mostly Canadian troops from Halifax to Europe.  The number of souls lost was 207.

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Here’s another victim, Empress of Britain taken in 1932.  You can see the Empire State Building less than a year “topped-out” at this time. Empress of Britain made its first crossing from Southampton to Quebec City in spring 1931.  Here she was likely completing her first visit to the sixth boro, headed for Southampton to complete her first trip around the world. In November 1939 she was requisitioned as troop transport.  Less than a year later she too was sunk by a combination of a German bomber and U-boat.    She was the largest Canadian-owned merchant vessel lost in WW2;  beyond that, she was the largest ship sunk by a WW2 submarine.  For others, click here.

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I’ll be looking for sunshine in the next days and longer.

Sometimes I know what these are or it is.  In this case, I don’t.  Photo is not the sharpest, but this cargo does intrigue.

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Likely, the top photo and the two below are unrelated.  Ashley Hutto took the top on Sunday, and I took the bottom two Saturday.

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The cargo on the barge pushed by Sarah Ann is uncovered and looks more like an art project, whereas the cargo pushed by Susan Miller looks more utilitarian, but I’ve erred before.

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Do you remember this cargo from November 2012?  I knew what it was, but I would not otherwise have guessed that it would become

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part of this.

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Many thanks to Ashley for the top photo;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Another secret salt’s been photographing, this one in the waters near Galveston, a place I’ve not been.

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Here he passed San Roberto and Rana Miller, which I have not seen in the sixth boro since 2009.

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The orange boats are AET, and assist with lightering operations, as does Rana.   Josephine K Miller must be offshore.

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Mr. Henry works for Barry Graham Oil Services.

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Thor is one large tractor tug.

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I’m not sure what vessel that is in the foreground, but

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Ocean Star appears to be a petroleum museum, a concept I’d not considered,

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whereas these rigs have not yet been promoted–or demoted–to museum service.

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One of these years, i’ll have to gallivant this way.  Many thanks to the secret salts.

 

Thanks to Gerard Thornton for use of these photos.

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Steppenwolf, or at least strutting gull.  Beneath the wheel, or at least the wheels of the cranes.  The Glass Bead Game, or at least the metal box shifting enterprise.   Journey to the East, or at least shuttling between east and west and all the other cardinal points . . . .  Maybe a dedicated literature carrier?

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I’ll stop here, but I love these moody, Hesse-enhancing photos by Gerard.

I have seen Ernest Hemingway in the boro a few times, and I’m waiting for Thomas Pynchon, although I thought I recognized him more than once.

 

I’ve done so many Grouper posts over the years that I should  recap.  The photos you see below show a tugboat called Green Bay, which was built in Cleveland OH in 1912 as Gary.    Here are the subsequent renamings of Gary:  Green Bay 1934, Oneida 1981, Iroquois 1987, Alaska 1990, and finally Grouper 1998.  Today, Grouper languishes in the Erie Canal near Lock E-28A, a good 325 miles from the sixth boro.   Many folks would love to see it resurrect with the name Grouper or some other one.

I’ve gotten lots of email about Grouper, but I really like messages like this one I got last weekend from Jeff Gylland:

“I rode Grouper as a kid all the time.  My Grandfather, Lester Gamble,  was the captain of then tug Green Bay out of Manitowoc, WI.  Have many memories of strong coffee and even stronger language.  The boat was converted from coal to diesel in the 1950s.  I have many pictures if you are interested.  Would love to come to Lyons with 50 gallons of paint and put the old Green, White and Red in the correct places.”

So I wrote Jeff, told him what I knew, and a bit later got another email, this one from Jeff’s aunt, Deborah Wiegand:

“I see my nephew Jeff contacted you and already sent some of our photos.  I have a collection ( maybe 20+) of professionally taken photos of the Green Bay taken during the years 1953-69 when my dad Lester R. Gamble was her captain.

The family had thought the tug had been scrapped until a historical blog based in Manitowoc came up with the information on her decline and current situation and brought it to my attention. It is heart-breaking to us.  Both Jeff and I regularly rode along with Dad on tows and have many stories & good memories to share of her.  Please let us know how we can help. Don’t hesitate to call me is you want to chat.”
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I believe City of Midland 41, below, was converted into a barge which began operating as Pere Marquette 41 in 1998.  Ah, the circle of life.
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Here Green Bay moves the Great Lakes steamer SS South American, built 1913, which some readers may recall seeing in the Delaware River as late as 1992.

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Edward L. Ryerson is a beautiful bulk carrier, launched in 1960,  still operating on the Great Lakes.

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Note the ice on the harbor here.

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Here Green Bay fights a fire in 1952.

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Many thanks to Deborah and Jeff for these fabulous photos.  It is my hope that Green Bay, Grouper, et al  .  . is brought out of its stupor in Lyons and finds yet another life.

 

Palabora . . . she’s got LEGS!!!  Italian legs.  … Lei ha le gambe!   gambe that will stand astride that harbor and be noticed, cartwheeling on the shore as traffic goes in and out of the Kills, and

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the legs of Bartholdi’s lady will be forever modestly covered.  So why are they made in Pescara on the Adriatic, and not in an American steel mill?  When you break it down, some parts are from Canada, Holland, Germany . . . .  I have no problem with this fact, but I think it should be noted as such.

Thanks to New York Media Boat for the photo.

Here are previous iterations of this title.

 

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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