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Well, the season is wrong and the implement over the right shoulder belies merriment, but the hat and beard are almost right . . .

The colors here are festive, but  . . . it’s not right.

Floating here in a TowBoatU.S. water sled “pushed” by 150 horses past Boldt Castle . . . or if you choose to believe that’s what the North Pole looks like, or

 

here, near a navaid in the 1000 Islands . . . yes, these last two are much better.  Santa transport, another service of Seaway Marine Group.

Merry Christmas to all my faithful readers and commenters . . .  Now you can leave the internet and enjoy the day with whomever you choose to.  Or, you can check out all these tugster Christmas posts from past years.

Top two photos by Will Van Dorp, and last two from Jake Van Reenen.

Who knows what an imaginary guy looks like anyhow?  Here’s a mid-19th century view. The Dutch descendants upriver celebrate him this way, from a 2013 tugster post.  Or, is this Santa person really based on a folktale from the Sami in Lapland?

Today’s photos and text by my friend Lew, whose annotations I adapted.

“Crews with lots of blue equipment have been dredging Old Saybrook North Cove off the CT River.  Though they’ve has been here since mid-November, this is about the first chance I got to take some pictures.  I was out for a late afternoon bicycle ride and had only my phone and “beater” pocket camera.”
Off Old Saybrook,  which tug?

Here’s dredge Michigan with Brian Nicholas and Paul Andrew….

 

 

“Though the sun doesn’t cooperate for those us shore-bound by an early haul-out this time of year, they take the loaded scows out to Long Island Sound where approx 1/2 mile offshore, dredge Delaware Bay (spudded down off the Knollwood section of Old Saybrook) transloads to a larger barge that

Atlantic Enterprise takes to the New Haven dumpsite.”

Many thanks to Lew for these photos, especially this good profile of Atlantic Enterprise.

And here’s something quite unrelated . . . want reclaimed barn lumber for the finest of projects, check here.

Many thanks to Lisa Kolibabek for these photos.  Any guesses what’s happening here, besides a green tug approaching a RORO?

See the mariners?  Lowering something?

Another ship . . . .

Dropping a line . . .

What’s that bag at the end of the line between the vessels?

Aha!   I include these photos out of order.  So we’re back to the mariners  . . . and the rest of the earlier photo.

and they’re RAISING something related to Philadelphia’s SCI Santa Run.  The delivery vessel here is Jupiter, a survivor from 1902.

This gives this photo a whole new interpretation.

Ditto this photo.  Crew dropped a line . . .

to receive a package from the tug that includes the “red guy” with the extravagant beard and unusual flotation jacket.

Indeed . . . a great idea.   Bravo to SCI of Philadelphia and South Jersey.

Thanks for these photos to Lisa, who reports visiting M/V MORNING LAURA, M/T FREJA HAFNIA, M/T LILLESAND.

She also sends along the Santa Run 2017 report from SCI:   “80 ditty bags were delivered to the 80 seafarers at the Packer Avenue, Axeon, and Paulsboro Refining terminals.   See our website at sciphiladelphia.org.  The top sponsors are Urban Engineers and Mary Ruth Talley.   During the month of December we deliver about 2000 ditty bags to all the seafarers of the Pennsylvania and South Jersey side of the Delaware River.   They include hats, scarves, work gloves, socks, and basic daily essentials of shaving cream, deodorant, toothpaste, etc.   Many of the hats and scarves are knitted throughout the year by volunteers from all over the region.   This year, as part of their rebranding campaign, Philaport sponsored over 700 ski caps.   The ditty bags always put a smile on the seafarers face.  To be thought about when so far from home during the holidays is so appreciated. ”

Here’s the SCI main site with the starting point for their archival photos.  I understand that SCI NY used to do a similar run with W. O. Decker.  I’d love to see photos  . .  from the 1990s or earlier.   PortSide NewYork used to as well.

For some of Lisa’s Christmas cheer photos from two years ago, click here and scroll.  Jupiter is one of the loved vessels of the Philadelphia Ship Preservation Guild. 

 

 

 

 

I’ve never been to Venice, a fact I’d love to remedy soon;  maybe I have to visit it soon.  The third photo in this recent post about lighthouses had a mystery location.  Congratulations to Tommy Bryceland, who guessed it was Venice.

Since large ships do call in Venice, there must be rimorchiatori aka tugboats, like Ida C.  Click here and work with the language to see their whole fleet.  Of course, you’d expect gondolas, with their 1000-year-old design.  Gondolas, whether in Minnesota or NY or Las Vegas,  appear all similar.  Given the connection between Marco Polo and Asia to the east, I wonder if there was design influence with the beams I recall seeing among marsh Arabs in southern Iraq . .. .

Here’s a better profile of an unusual cruise ship, Wind Star.  

More rimorchiatori in the Grand Canal the day Jonathan was out there with his camera include Marina M C

 

 

and Clara C.

All photos thanks to Jonathan Steinman, some of whose previous photos on tugster can be found here.   A previous post with photos on the water in Venice can be found here.

For the full set of rimorchiatori da Venezia, click here.

The cargo port is to the west of old city.

 

Remember the December 2016 saga involving

Colleen McAllister and Katie G. McAllister?  Note the blackout painting where the stack rings once were?  Thanks to Krystal Kauffman, here’s

an update from Muskegon.

The photo below comes from Jake Van Reenen as they were departing Frink Park in Clayton near the 1000 Islands.  It’s a moody photo.  Ontario–ex-Jeffrey K McAllister— and Erie–ex-Missy McAllister— traveled from the East Coast, with a stop in Halifax, and

were in Cleveland earlier this year.  If that is Erie, along Ontario‘s starboard side, she’s already received some paint.  South Carolina, maybe scrapped by now, is a product of Manitowoc 1925.

Maine, a product of Cleveland, dates from 1921.

Towmaster is a 1952 product of Bushey, currently shown here in New London.

Ira S. Bushey also produced Thameship, a 1940 vessel, two hulls later than Chancellor.

Thanks to Krystal Kauffman for use of the first three photos, hats off to Jake Van Reenen, and the others by Will Van Dorp.

If you “do” FB, Krystal has a FB page called My Michigan By Krystal. 

 

About four years ago she arrived  . . . and has been lifting into place this huge structure sometimes described as one of the largest current civil engineering project in the country.  Her original name Left Coast Lifter , a ZPMC product, stuck despite attempts at New Yorkizing it, renaming it I Lift NY or Ichabod Crane.

I saw the size of those blocks recently when I drove across the new bridge for the first time, but being alone in the car . . . obviously, no pics.

But the Lifter has been repurposed now.  I don’t suppose my attempt to rename her now will succeed any better… But how about Downstate Dropper, Tappan Zee DeconstructorDewey-Driscoll-Wilson Dismantler?

But thankfully, the crane does more than just drop the sections for scrap, and I’m often not so thrilled by state or federal decisions, but here’s a good one:  sections of the old bridge will be used to replace compromised infrastructure in the Hudson Valley.  Here’s a story.

And the rest of these photos, thanks to Glenn Raymo, show these sections on their way to re-use, signs and all.

 

 

Many thanks to Glenn for use of these photos.  The top three photos by Will Van Dorp, who has posted about this bridge many times . . .. 

 

It’s mid afternoon, and what’s this?  In past years, I’ve posted photos discharging coal in the harbor, loading scrap away from the dock, and lightering salt.

Midmorning earlier I’d seen Frances slinging a scow out of Duraport, but I had  no clue

where she was headed.

Until some hours later.  Frances here delivers an empty scow to starboard of SBI Phoebe.

And here’s a split second after the top photo.  Any guesses on cargo and its provenance?

Frances stays busy, delivering an empty and taking a load to Duraport.  Must be lightering.

Thanks to Phil Porteus who was passing Duraport in the wee hours, 0123 to be precise, now we know SBI Phoebe was being lightened so that it could complete discharging here.

So are your guesses ready as to cargo and origin?

It’s sand from Egypt, a raw material they have lots of.  But what makes Egyptian sand worthy of being transported across the sea and ocean?  Salt content or lack of it?

Many thanks to Phil for his night photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Under wraps last summer, this new build in Cleveland was ready for the intended client, but  . . .

“we have a problem” finalizing the deal, so there had to be another deal.

So finally a month ago, San Jose got under way from Cleveland getting through the Saint Lawrence and around Nova Scotia bound for eastern US.

Jack Ronalds caught the next two photos as the tug and crew sought refuge in Port Hawkesbury after having ridden out gales from the mouth of the Saint Lawrence to the Strait of Canso.

When the stormy seas lay down, they left port again, rounding the point at Canso, but southern coast of Nova Scotia was still rough and required sheltering again before making the jump across to Portsmouth NH,

arriving in the wee hours at this lovely spot on Ceres Street up the Piscataqua a ways.

I have long history with the Piscataqua going back to the mid-1980s.  As a much younger kayaker, I used to ride its current all the way around New Castle . . . .  Here, here, and here are some previous tugster posts mostly showing Portsmouth.  Note the Christmas tree of Drum Point?  To her port side is Mary M. Coppedge.  More Moran photos from Portsmouth will be included in an upcoming post.

Here’s a closeup of San Jose, with an

even closer up here, showing the location of its intended client.

And finally, here’s a view of the Moran yard from Badgers Island, Maine, a short distance across the Piscataqua.  What these last few photos fail to convey is the inviting smell of lobsters, shellfish, and other delightful fruits of the sea.

San Jose COULD be called Handy Four, as its largely the same vessel as Handy Three shown below, as taken in 2013 in the process of my writing this article.  San Jose will soon be painted to match the other Moran tugs in the photo above, as Handy Three has already been since PRT has been purchased by Moran.

 

Thanks to Jack Ronalds for use of his photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp, who just has to find some good lobster for dinner today.

 

George sent me these photos months ago, and I apologize for leaving them in storage for so long. But since I have a lull in traveling, these photos need to come out now, starting with Deschenes, about which I’ll have more to say at the end of this post.  This photo was taken in the interestingly named town of De Tour Village, MI, a place definitely on my list for a summer trip.

As I reconstruct George’s journey, which started and ended the same day in Sault Ste Marie MI, he drove close to 500 miles to get these photos.  I’ve rearranged the order.  This fish tug on the Garden Peninsula appears to be called Morning Star, although likely in earlier days it had a different name.  I skipped this peninsula on my trip last summer.

Farther east and south, he shot Siscowet (1946) over the fence.  As of some time ago, the Burger Boat vessel was still not scrapped.

Lake Explorer, built 1963 as a USCG 82′ cutter, is now retired from the Minnesota Sea Grant program. No doubt, the vessel below has shifted some of its work to Lake Guardian, which I caught here entering Milwaukee harbor.

Krystal started life as 45′ ST 2168, later USACE Thunder Bay, launched by Roamer Boat in 1953. Some Roamer STs previously posted on this blog can be located here.

LARCs . . . here’s one.

This tug yacht . . .  George had no clues about.  Anyone?

Linda Jean, built in Green Bay in 1950, spent a quarter century as a fish tug before transformation into a pilot boat, a role she continues–I believe–to serve. I’ve long been intrigued by fish tugs.    In the distance, that’s Drummond Islander IV, 148′ x 43′ with 32-car capacity, since 2000 providing year-round service to  . . . Drummond Island.  Click here for the great shots of her “walking” over the ice on a -15 degrees F morning.  How can drones even work in that?

If there were plans to scuttle this Chicago River icebreaker fireboat as a dive site over a decade ago, well, only skydivers could descend on her in her location as of some months back.  It’s Fireboat Engine No. 37 aka Joseph Medill, launched in 1949 and retired in 1936 1986.

My reason for starting out with George’s photo of Deschenes is that she is for sale.  Here’s a photo of the boat in 2003.

Here she is out of the water at Passage Boat Works in De Tour, MI, and

and here’s the paperwork.  If interested, here’s more:  asking price is $22,000.00 and contact is Les Thornton at les.d.thornton@gmail.com

Thanks to George and Les for use of these photos.

And happy thanksgiving, today and every day.

Unrelated:  Enjoy this slide show of the work leading up to the opening on the VZ Bridge 53 years ago today, and below, that’s Sarah D outbound under the VZ near midsummer earlier this year at 0530  . . .

I’m always happy to put up others’ photos. Cell phone shots, though, don’t display well on a larger screen.  If you’ve sent a photo that I’ve not yet used, I’m working on it.

First, from Phil Gilson .  .  Driftmaster is retrieving a car that plunged off the fishing pier in Bay Ridge earlier last week.   Driftmaster‘s fleet mate Hayward sometimes gets drawn into such recoveries also, as is shown here.  And from tugster, here’s more fishing of this sort.

These are the folks who locate and investigate below the surface,

although it might be possible to use tools on Hocking as well.

Here’s a repost of a hypothetical map of my neighborhood assuming a sea level rise of 100′.  Here are additional hypothetical, less extreme maps.

And finally, from Glenn Raymo, enjoy these photos of the Science Barge The Judy being moved upriver for winter.

 

Moving the barge is Fred Johannsen, previously appearing on this blog among other times here, when it had, in my opinion, a less attractive paint scheme.

Thanks to  Phil, Jeffrey, and Glenn for use of these photos.

 

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