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Let’s pick up from yesterday and follow Atlantic Star from the Narrows to the part of the KVK called the “salt pile.”  To the right off the stern of Atlantic Star, that’s lower Manhattan.

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Ellen McAllister swoops in to deliver the docking pilot.  The signature “G” on the stack points to Grimaldi Group, of which ACL is an associate. Grimali’s West Africa service is a regular in the sixth boro with such vessels as Grande Morocco.

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Seen from head-on, the bow is knife edged, but in profile it’s plumb. Yes, that’s the Statue of Liberty in the distance.

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That’s Robbin Reef Light and WTC1 just off its right.  Atlantic Star and the other G4 vessels are operated by a crew of 16, compared with 21 for the G3 vessels like Atlantic Concert.

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The cranes in the distance are at the MOTBY terminal.

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We’re now in the KVK with the salt pile to port and

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the Bayonne Bridge ahead, and Atlantic Concert being assisted beneath.

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Eric McAllister joins, and we’ll pick it up there tomorrow.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, with thanks to the NY Media Boat for conveyance.

Here was Atlantic Star approaching the Narrows on Saturday, still a half hour outside the Narrows.  She was launched at the Hudong-Zhonghua Shipyard almost a year ago, and this maiden cargo voyage began in Hamburg on December 9, 2015.    Note the FDNY escort boat just forward of her bow.

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That’s the Verrazano Narrows Bridge off her bow and a fog-beshrouded WTC off her stern.

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The generation 4 (G4)  Atlantic Star followed a G3 Atlantic Concert into port.   Here and here are views from different perspectives of other G3 ACL vessels, all dating from the mid-1980s.

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More photos of the arrival tomorrow.

For a comparison of the G3 and G4 vessels by the numbers, click here and here.  For more detail on the vessel, click here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, protected under creative commons license.  Also, conveyance would not have been possible without the NY Media Boat;  thanks Bjoern.

 

Here’s Ocean Traverse Nord, 213′ loa and a trailing suction hopper dredge built in Quebec City in 2012.

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photo taken on St. Lawrence in June 2015

Here’s Manhattan, trailing suction hopper dredge built in Sparrows Point in 1904, hull #43.

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And this is Atlantic, hull #44, also from Sparrows Point.

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Finally, Dodge Island, loa 275′ and built in Slidell LA in 1980.

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photo taken off New Jersey in November 2015

Thanks to Barrel for the archival photos;  the two color photos by Will Van Dorp.

Related:  click here for lots of photos of vintage USACE dredge equipment.

 

Kyle’s words:  “Collecting postcards, mainly of shipping, is … one of my hobbies. I came across recently showing a parade of vessels with many more in the background, apparently in New York harbor. While most are distant, the closest tug is closest enough to see that it is under Lehigh Valley operation, however the name is just blurry enough to not be readable.   Doing a quick search, I believe the Lehigh Valley tug is the CHEEKTOWAGA of 1902.”

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My two cents:  “It could be the christening of the boat, given the pennants?  I was searching but you beat me to it.   Here is some info on the yard that built Cheektowaga, assuming that is the boat.”

My anteing up:  “Oops!  It can’t be Cheektowaga because that was built for the Lehigh Valley subset called the Easton and Amboy Railroad.

Following up on Kyle’s first line, I decided to search for some postcards online.  Quickly I came to this, which tantalizes as you scroll.  His is by Harris Post Card Co.

Click here for other posts Kyle contributed to.

Alpha is the caption on the photo, but there’s no 1928 boat by that name on this list.  Might it also have been called Captain Eric Bergland?

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Convoy is one of the four sisters delivered by Leathem Smith in Wisconsin in the spring of 1941. I love the coil on the hawser rack.   I posted photos of wo of the four sisters side by side in this post a few months back . .  scroll.

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You can read here a story of Evanick, christened in 2006 by the widow of its namesake.  Here’s the Professional Mariner story of her, comparing the Texas-built Evanick‘s power (3000 hp) as twice that of Raymond C. Peck, the vessel she replaced. Peck became Martha T and , unfortunately, made casualty news here in March 2013.

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Bluestone Drifter is not much unlike the self-propelled scows (SPS’s) used extensively on the Erie Canal.  This “crane boat,” as the USACE calls it, comes from Utica IN in 2001, making it much newer than the SPS’s on the Canal.

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Grand Tower, also Indiana-built, was commissioned in 2001.

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Prairie du Rocher is a 2002 product of the same shipyard as Grand Tower and Bluestone Drifter.

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Ditto Sanderford, 2005.  I’m starting to want to make a trip along the Ohio visiting shipyards  . . . soon.

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Iroquois, delivered in 2005 from a Louisiana shipyard, operates from the Nashville USACE yard.

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Barrel calls this Racine, but I can find no info about a newish USACE tug called Racine.  Anyone help?

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J. C. Thomas is a 2000 product of Jeffboat, also along the Indiana bank of the Ohio.  Click here for another product of Jeffboat, Cape Henlopen, some folks’ favorite people mover. Is it true that Jeffboat is considered the largest inland ship builder in the US?

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I don’t know the date of this photo of Derrick Boat #7 and tug Pilot, but the style of the derrick is quite similar to what is used in the Erie Canal.

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And finally for today, there’s an unidentified USACE tug pushing dredge William L. Goetz.  Anyone have an ID or an idea?

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Many thanks to Barrel for these photos.  More of them to come . . .

For an article on what is claimed to be the largest diesel towboat operating on the Mississippi–I’m always skeptical about superlatives–click here.  That article actually describes what could be called MV Mississippi V.  The largest one I’ve ever seen is MV Mississippi IV, now pulled up on a bank in Vicksburg, MS, a museum.  Enjoy these photos I took there three years and four days ago.

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All photos in this series came via “Barrel,” a 30+ year employee of USACE, and they’ve raised a handful of questions, launched a clutch of searches.

Stacy McAllister, previously Houma . . .  I don’t know the year this photo was taken, but since YTL-811 came into McAllister hands in 2003, that fact narrows the date.  By my count, McAllister has over a dozen–13 by my count–of these similarly remodeled tugs acquired through the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service.  How many can you name?  My answer follows.

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This photo of triple-screw Patriot, in a previous Vane Brothers livery, had to have been taken between 2001 and 2009, after which date Vane sold it to Mexico. See the last photo in this link.

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Here’s a mystery . . .  Which company’s logo is that on the stack of Anne, towing the Loveland 22 barge with the 260 rocket motor.  And what type of antenna is that on the after portion of Anne‘s deckhouse?

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Nearer is Connor A. Gisclair, now possibly known as Mr. Connor.  Anyone identify the smaller farther-away tug with the barge alongside?

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USACE tug Deland was built in 1919, and if my info is correct, it has been transformed into a commercial fishing vessel called Pursuit, operated out of Panama City FL.  I’ve tried unsuccessfully to find a photo of Pursuit. Can anyone help?

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This photo looks quite similar.  Six of these vessels were built by Johnson Iron Works in 1919, one of which was called Degrey and sank off Atlantic City in 1976 then known as Patrice McAllister.  Now forty years later, she’s still there and a popular diving spot in 55 feet of water.  Click here for a story on how hurricane Sandy modified the Patrice wreck.

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That’s it for today.  All photos have been provided by Barrel.

And the 13 McAllister ex-YTBs are as follows:  Kaleen ( Pontiac ), Stephen ( Okumulgee ), Jeffrey (Dahlonega), Margaret (Tonkawa), Donal G. (Antigo), Ellen (Piqua), Robert E. (Nanticoke), Beth M. (Ocala), Missy (Anoka), Dorothy (Tontocany), Patrick (Wathena), and Daniel not the one in Montreal( Shabonee ). There may in fact be others, given that Timothy McAllister (Wapato) is not listed on this site.

 

Here were the previous in this series.

The first three photos here come from John “Jed” Jedrlinic, whose previous contributions can be found here.

Coral Coast is a venerable 3000 hp 45-year-old, like some others I know, although they might not see all that horsepower as complimentary.

photo date 8 FEB 2011

photo date 8 FEB 2011

Katherine, same horsepower, is nine years newer.

photo date 8 FEB 2011

photo date 8 FEB 2011

This Michael S is based in Port Canaveral, where Jed took this photo.

photo date 4 MARCH 2011

photo date 4 MARCH 2011

Harry Thompson, whose previous contributions include this one, sent this along of Russell 11 (I believe that’s eleven, not two) compliments of his brother.  Does anyone know Russell 11‘s years of service?

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And the rest of these come from Barrel, who has sent along many others I will share this month.

Tug Bay Hawk dates from 1942.  Thanks to Birk’s site, here’s some info on her.

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Here’s Crowley’s Ensign on the Delaware River, 7200 horsepower.   Here and here are tugster posts of similar Crowley tugs.  In the distance, that looks like a Vane Brothers tug.

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Teresa McAllister, 1961,  was most recently on tugster here.

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And to close out today’s post, it’s Tenacious, now a 55-year-old freshwater tug.

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Many thank to Jed, Harry, and Barrel for these photos.

 

If there’s a shortage of any kind of stuff these days, there seems to be a dire scarcity of compassion, tolerance,  . . .  So it doesn’t matter what you believe or don’t believe, I’m sure we have common ground in thinking we need

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peace on Earth and goodwill towards everyone, especially this year.  That’s what I see in these decorations and hear in the music.

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From here in NY’s sixth boro on bows and

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sterns.

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From the south,

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the middle,

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and the north . . .

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and from this card someone sent me . . . have a happy day.  And a calm and boring day;  let

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me explain.  Click on the image below to hear a song by Capt. Josh Horton that probably captures the sentiments of crews at sea today.

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Here was 2014, and here was 2013.  Also, two years ago it thrilled me to share photos I received from the good folks at Hughes Marine to get photos from 1997 —here –of the year the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree came downriver by tug and barge.  And more good folks at Cross Sound Ferry sent along photos from 2003, here, when their ferry North Star delivered the tree that year . . . crewed in part by Rockettes!

If you’ve got time today for the background on how NORAD started reporting on Santa movements back at the height (or depth) of the Cold War in 1955, click here.  Here’s another version of the same Cold War story.

Thanks to Brendan Matton for the photo of Paul Andrew, Tali Padilla for the photo of Z-One lit up at the San Juan dock, Lisa Kolibabek of Cape Cod and Bonnie Halda for Jupiter both on the Delaware River, and Mike Magnant for the be-snowmanned Toot Toot.  Barrel sent me the photo of the red clad beard guy on the green 29. I took the photos at South Street Seaport Museum.

Finally, if you want to squelch the “red elf” mythology, check out the name of this 1963-built bulker AND its status.

 

Many thanks to Glen for this photo of his restored 1934 below.  His words:  “Naomi and I on our 1934 retired, fully restored USCG motor lifeboat up on the Snake River (a tributary of the Columbia) last spring. We did 14 dam lock thrus in 14 days! Have a great Holiday Season from Glen and Naomi out here in Washington State.”

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Here was a post I did two years ago on a 1929 Type T motor lifeboat, slightly shorter and narrower.  Scroll through here and you’ll see a photo of a Type-T operating in NY’s sixth boro.

Click here for a recent post that used Glen’s photos.

 

She started out as S. O. Co. No. 14 from a shipyard not far from her current Penn’s Landing berth and worked for almost 80 years.   For more on that story, read this article from the historiccamdencounty.com.

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The next two photos are credited to Bonnie Halda, who took them last week.

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Baltimore, completed in 1906, was built at the same yard as Pegasus,  1907.

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Except for the two credited to Bonnie Halda, all photos were taken by Will Van Dorp.   For a post with more photos of these old-timers and others, click here.

For an even older and much modified one, click here for a post I did on Charlotte, built in 1880 as a sandbagger.  Click here for info on Swell, a repurposed 1912 tug operating in British Columbia.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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