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You might have known that I had the good fortune to gallivant most of last week, and it’s tough to gallivant without recording some images.   I took several hundred photos, and not only of boats and ships.  As with infants, humans in unfamiliar places detect patterns, familiar details.  

Pattern recognition kicked in when I glanced across the Mississippi toward the Algiers side and saw Bouchard colors, although a little digging yielded info that Robert J. Bouchard, name notwithstanding, is now a Centerline Logistics vessel.  I suppose she’ll be painted soon.  Robert J. has worked in the sixth boro, but the most recent time she appeared on this blog was over 12 years ago here.

Dann Ocean colors are also familiar, but the profile is as well.  Rodney is one of several formerly Moran boats dating from class of 1975.  Rodney at one time was Sheila Moran. Of that same class, Moran’s Heide is now Dann Ocean’s Helen and Moran’s Joan is now Dann Ocean’s Roseada.  There may be others I’m unaware of, like the barge Carolina.

 

“Diaspora” refers to those who depart from a location, and they should be distinguished from the incoming (I’m wondering if there’s a word for them more general than immigrant) .  And as I understand it, Courageous, downbound here a few days ago on the Mississippi, was on its delivery and will be arriving in the sixth boro early this week, maybe today.  I didn’t notice her on AIS, but FB reports her departing Charleston SC for the sixth boro yesterday, Sunday. She’s sister vessel to Commodore, involved in a mishap this past summer.

 

I’d never have guessed that Crescent’s Miriam Walmsley Cooper had a sixth boro connection, but a little digging shows the 1958 boat once worked in the boro as Harry M. Archer M. D., an FDNY  boat. Anyone have a photo of her in FDNY colors?  Was she single screw already then?

 

I saw a pattern in the photo below because another formerly huge Bouchard tug saw transformation in the same drydock, Donna J. Bouchard to Centerline’s Robin Marie.

As it turned out, this was the former Kim M. Bouchard, now to be Lynn M. Rose.  Her eventual appearance will match Susan Rose.

And it appears that next in line for rehab and transformation, Robert J. will become a Centerline vessel as well.

All photos last week, WVD, who is happy to be back in the boros, any of the six.

Gallivants are intended to stimulate change, a path forward for which I’m seeking.  How strange it was then when I exchanged business cards with a Nola gentleman yesterday and his card was in the form of a Tarot card;  it was Death, the Grim Reaper signifying imminent major change in one’s life.  The old has to die for rebirth to be possible, like with plants.

Speaking of change, the calendar year too is about to change and in preparation, I recently created a 2022 calendars, of which 15 are left for sale. I’m expecting the shipment will arrive at Tugster Tower shipping office today. More details later but if you’re interested, email me your interest and your address. Send no money at this time, please, but prices will likely be up a tad because, of course, (fill in the blank here with your favorite scapegoat).

Unrelated:  Grain de Sail is back in the boro, their third time calling here in less than a year.

Crescent has fleets in at least three southern cities, and I’ve featured some of them previously here.

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Providence, built 1953, has quite some history in the Northeast, including the sixth boro. Port Allen was built in NYC at Consolidated in 1945, and Angus R. Cooper dates from 1965.

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I’d never thought of this before, but from this angle, it appears that W. O. Decker is painted in Crescent Towing livery.

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Margaret F. Cooper, similarly, worked for a time in NYC’s sixth boro.

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As did Miriam Walmsley Cooper!  But southern living seems to agree with these boats, from what I could see as I passed.

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Have another look at Providence.  I’m sure some of you have photos of some of these boats back when they worked in the Northeast.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

The photo below shows a vessel with a quite rare place of registry . . . Washington DC!  How often do you see that  on a stern?  More on that later.   These photos were taken about a week ago, and have since scattered to the seven seas.

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Florida has an unusual wheelhouse although it has to have great upward views . . .

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I was surprised to learn Balsa 87 was built in 2012, given its design and small size.

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Bonny Island . . . offloading

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salt?  Before Christmas it was in Savannah . . . now it’s–like me–is in the sixth boro.

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Bright Hero has since moved from Savannah to New Orleans.

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This one’s for bowsprite . . .  who sometimes is afflicted with the same type of misperception as I am . . .  Not surprisingly, this name has been given to many vessels, but this Ocean Pearl is currently departing Delaware Bay.

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UASC Shuaiba has since traversed the Panama Canal!

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And that DC-registed container ship . . . it entered Savannah escorted by Florida and

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and –15 hours later–departed with Savannah as escort.

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Washington Express . . . a great name.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA0aaaadn6The first two photos above were taken from Mariner’s Harbor, Staten Island on Dec. 17.    The next three were taken inbound Savannah, GA on Dec. 20.  The last one is Dec. 21 . . . As of today–Dec. 27–I’m wondering where Maersk Denpasar is . . .  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA0aaaabd70aaaabd60aaaabd50aaaabd4OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA0aaaabd1I didn’t understand the name Bulldog until I put together the fact that the University of Georgia team mascot is Uga, the bulldog.  And there have been Ugas going back for a long time.  Google it.

Meanwhile, I’m hoping to get from the #4 US port for volume to the #3 port by the end of Sunday.  All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

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Georgia.  Peacemaker.  What a name . . .! If only we all agreed on what that would have to be . . . .  Happy all-the-holidays in all the languages.  I like this one I learned from frogma:  mele kalikimaka.  Or this one I made up:  mare. eek! charisma’s.

Type peacemaker into the blog search window for some info on her Brazilian provenance.

 

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To see the four Savannah posts from almost five years ago, type “savannah” into the search window on left side of the blog page.  It hardly seems possible that a half decade has passed since the last time I was here.

Anyhow . . . on the road and enjoying seeing these Sun, Moran, and Crescent tugs . . . and all the rest.

 

From the air you can see the traffic . . . the sinuous lines it scribes into the legendary river.

From the bank, you can see sometimes three tugs abreast (l. to r. Bobby Jones-1966, David G. Sehrt-1965, and Born Again-1974) pushing more than a dozen barges slipping around the turn between Algiers and the 9th Ward.  And when I say slipping, I mean even big vessels seem to slide through this crescent. That erosion in the foreground bespeaks higher water.

Uh . . . a variation on seasnake?

Crescent’s J. K. McLean (2010 at C & G Boatworks of Mobile, AL) and New Orleans (1998 at ThomaSea) maneuver in front of 1995 American Queen.

Close-up of McLean.

Empty Barge Lines’ Grosbec (1980).

Olga G. Stone (1981) pushing oil downbound.

Miss Abby (1960 ?) upbound.

Slatten’s Allison S (1994) light and headed upstream past Bollinger’s.

Ingram Barge Company’s Mark C.  A few years back, I saw Ingram boats all the up in Cincinnati, OH and Pittsburgh, PA.

Another Ingram vessel featured a few days ago . .  . David G. Sehrt.

Vickie (1975) pushing  . . . crushed concrete maybe . . .

Port Allen (1945?!!)

Chelsea (1989)

I’m back at work in environs of the sixth boro, and this is the last set about Nola strictly defined.  Tomorrow I hope to put up some fotos from a jaunt-within-a-gallivant southwest from the Crescent City, a truly magical place to which I really must return soon because there’s much I’ve yet to understand . . . like why

the nola hula only appears to salute certain vessels.

And is it true there’s a nun driving a tugboat somewhere on the Lower Mississippi?  Here’s a ghost story, and if you have a chance to find it, listen to Austin Lounge Lizard’s  “Boudreaux was a Nutcase.”

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who also has tons of fotos from Panama to put up.

I’m deep in the “fog of travel,” a phrase I learned from David Hindin.  So only the facts, here:

Crescent’s Alabama.

Marquette’s Blake Denton and Ingram Barge’s David G. Sehrt, sporting her triple stacks.

Silver Fox motivated (I think) by Todd G.

BW Havis, as seen from Algiers.

Bisso’s Capt. Bud Bisso.

Greg Turecamo.

Ralph E. Bouchard.

Anna Victoria pushing heavy against the current painted with silt from a dozen of so Midwest farm states extending all the way to Montana,.

Traffic moves all day and night, just like the bon temps in Nola.

Coral Mermaid.

Chandlery boat Brandi.

And . . . just the facts . . . some legendary aquatic creature doing the nola hula for a sea-bound MSC Nederland.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  More soon.

If you didn’t see it yesterday, check out bowsprite’s nola.

Muddy water fast and wide separates St. Louis Cathedral from

boats bringing fresh air seekers like this waterblogger on the Algiers ferry named Louis Porteriere.

In mid-bend, the Creole Queen and Natchez (the 9th) dance in the current.  And  . . . yes, they did dance although this foto makes them look like blind jousters.

Tugboat New Orleans assists Power Steel make

a rotation in the current while

Blessed Trinity fights her way up river.

Capt. Jimmy T. Moran, developed for the Panama Canal but never used there,  heads downriver for an assist while

while the master plays the calliope.

It would be easy to stay here longer, but . . .

Many more Louisiana fotos to come though.

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