You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Peacemaker’ tag.

My trickster truckster hopper is filling and will dump one of these days soon, but this photo fits better in the “seats” category.

But to put this back on the water, here’s the power seat on ex-Catherine Turecamo now John Marshall.  I’d love to see this vessel in her current colors and working in her current environment . . . the tri-state ports along southern Lake Michigan.  I wonder if this is the original 1972 seat.  For the photo, thanks to Mike Fiedler, who also sent along this photo of the helm seat for Lake Express here (scroll).

Here she was in the East River in 2008.

To take on a Peacemaker with a 50-horse Boston Whaler look-alike, your seat must provide a sense of power.

Now this is a well-appointed seat of power, currently a training seat for other seats of power.  It’s Pentagoet (1980), platform for tug and barge skills acquisition at Maine Maritime.

Can you identify this seat of power?  The exterior colors could be a giveaway.

The “sticks” move the rudders on Grand Erie, flagship of the Canal Corp, former Mississippi River system Corps of Engineers pusher tug.

Any ideas of this?  I’ll call it the mystery seat until the end of this post.

Here’s a clue:  those are my shoes and below the seat is a glass floor.

Here is the locus of power award Fournier Tractor (1984), which currently works mostly in Penobscot Bay.  I took these other photos of the Maine boats here almost five years ago.

And the last seat of power comes from George Schneider.  Orange is the color of Edison Chouest.  George writes:  “It was 2011, and I was sent out on the ROV support ship MAX CHOUEST while they did an ROV survey of the wreckage of the DEEPWATER HORIZON.  The MAX, of course, is dynamically positioned, and so the operator needs to have all the DP displays nearby, plus controls to tell the system how to maneuver the vessel.  But being a workboat, it needs to be able to operate forward (in transit) or aft (when doing industrial work).  So the controls move with the operator, and the “Cyber Chair” slides fore and aft within the bridge as well as swiveling.  The whole concept was completely overwhelming to me.”

Thanks to Mike and George.  All other photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s planning at least one more “seats of power” post, so if you have photos of a bridge/helm/wheelhouse seat, please send it along.

Oh, the mystery seat . . . was in a dockside gantry crane operator cabin.

 

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Georgia.  Peacemaker.  What a name . . .! If only we all agreed on what that would have to be . . . .  Happy all-the-holidays in all the languages.  I like this one I learned from frogma:  mele kalikimaka.  Or this one I made up:  mare. eek! charisma’s.

Type peacemaker into the blog search window for some info on her Brazilian provenance.

 

Bonne annee from Savannah, but look who’s working:  crews of Maersk Jenaz and tugboat Bulldog.

Except this bridge officer, maybe.

Transfighter heads out in the setting sun to meet 2010 at sea.

Diane Moran travels upriver for an assist.

Another shot of Diane Moran with Cape Charles farther back and Peacemaker to the right.

And a final shot for now . . . Cape Henlopen upriver as well.

More soon.  Happy New Year whether you’re at work or play.  Ooops!  In honor of Conrad‘s steam whistles tonight, which I’ll miss, check out Susie

King Taylor‘s whistles as well as

the calliope on Georgia Queen.

Party at least a little tonight (in the blinking of an eye if that’s all the time you can afford).  Happy 2010.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Seeing the Moran boats on the upper left side of this foto reminds me that I owe you an answer to Relief Crew 9‘s question, which herinafter, shall be dubbed the “tugsterteaser,” term coined by Jed.  Tugster teases maybe but always delivers.  Answer comes thanks to Harold Tartell:

“The year of that photo would be early 1962.  The M. MORAN (brand new but  doesn’t look it) has returned to New York from Pusan, Korea after towing a floating generating plant for the U.S. Navy.  She left her builders (Gulfport Shipbuilding in Texas) in Oct. 1961 and made the tow from there directly to Pusan.  The MARIE S. MORAN built in 1961 (now TERESA McALLISTER) and sister MARGARET MORAN (now BRIAN A. McALLISTER) were both built in 1961 by Dravo Corp., Wilmington Del.  They were on charter to Moran with an option to buy.  McAllister took them over with the same agreement later that year, and ended up buying them.  They were the first two tugs in McAllister’s fleet single screw with Kort Nozzles.”  Thanks Jed and Harold!

So back to more posteriors.  After reading the bottom paragraph of this post, decide whether to some the expression should be “negatively posterior”?

L. W. Caddell is a 1990 built 16′ breadth tug working around the Caddell yard.

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Christian Reinauer, 2001, 40′ breadth.

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Pati R Moran, 2007, 36′

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Zachery Reinauer and Thomas J. Brown, 1971 and 28′ and  1962 . . . 19′.

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Rosemary McAllister, 2008, 36′.

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And while we’re looking at sterns, here’s an unexpected detail on Peacemaker, a boathouse behind the fold-down stern.  Bowsprite sends along this foto.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp, except the last one.

And some discoveries lead me to reiterate my creative commons licensing.  Fair is fair.  More on this later.  But please comment on this:  what should I do if unauthorized use of my work turns up?  What would you do?

My sentiments of more than two years ago amuse me here, and “full frontal” isn’t even really.  So in connection with a project I’m considering, here’s really  fully frontally.  Let’s start with HNLMS Tromp.  Now in those twin radomes, I see teddy bear’s ears.

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BNS Lobelia is harder to read.

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Of all the vessels in the Standing NATO Mine Countermeasures Group 1 (SNMCMG1), the most unusual was HNoMS Rauma.  Ever-reliable Jed sends these links here and here on vessel and hull design  Although Rauma traversed the Atlantic with the rest of the group, she seems marginally seaworthy.  But what do I know?    For all the SNMCMG1 vessels, visit Bowsprite.

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Peacemaker .  . spider be-webbed?

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Crow, (1963, Brooklyn, NY!) as seen at the bulkhead in Waterford last Saturday.

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Evening Mist, (1976, Houma, LA), big square house.

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Gulf Service, 1979, Amelia, LA) taller, hourglass houses.

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And this circles us back to Tromp, here following the egg-shaped Onrust, (2009, Rotterdam Junction, NY), featured many times on this blog.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who leaves soon for Kingston for . . .

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“Kingston Waterfront on the weekend of September 19-20. From noon to 6 p.m. both days, the WOW (Working on Water) event includes a tugboat bootcamp, trolley rides, lighthouse tours, sea shanty singers and more including “wandering tug geezers” and a “Working Hudson Picture Show.” The event is funded by the Ulster County Quadricentennial Commission, NYS assemblymember Kevin Cahill, the City of Kingston Quadricentennial Committee, and the Historic Kingston Waterfront Revival (Robert Iannucci and Sonia Ewers). For more information, check out the website here [www.workingonwater.org]. Meanwhile, from noon to 7 p.m. on September 19 at Cornell Park, which is located on Wurts Street, there’s a free outdoor drum music festival. Jack Dejohnette, the famed jazz drummer who played with jazz greats such as Miles Davis, and Jerry Marotta, who has played with Peter Gabriel and the Indigo Girls, among others, are scheduled to perform”  as quoted from   the http://www.ci.kingston.ny.us/

“Working Hudson Picture Show . .. ”  OOps!  That’s me.  Gotta run.  I’ll be at the Picture Show collecting ghost stories.  If you got one, tell it to my video camera, please?

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