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Numbers are hard to keep straight, but I think we’re up to 11 in this series.  The most relevant preceding post would be “High and Dry 8” here.

Yesterday I think I caught Saint Emilion getting hauled, with quite a few folks looking on, although maybe that number of folks is standard.  Doing the honors was the mobile boat hoist over at Bayonne Dry Dock & Repair.  

See the ladder in the water to the left?  I’m supposing it’s standard practice to have divers ensure that the slings are properly positioned before hauling out.

 

 

All photos, WVD.  Because so many interesting shapes of a vessel can be seen only when it’s hauled out, I’ve done a long series of posts on such.  This might be a stretch, but when exposed, the hidden lines and features of a vessel can seem a bit like nudity.

No . . . what follows is not a count down.

But here was nine, and eight is already linked above, 

seven,

six,

five,

four and H & D Caddells 4

three and an erroneous three.  [See . . . I have a challenge with numbers.  I’ll have to go back and renumber at some point. Unintentionally duplicating numbers is the result of working too fast.]

two and another erroneous or at least inconsistent II

one

and then there were others, only some of which werePegasus and Patty Nolan…and some schooners . . .

…you know. . . superlative like newest, biggest, fastest, most powerful,  most teu. . . it’s a series I should have started long ago, but tugster is a public work-in-progress.  And I’m skeptical of superlatives… since they change regularly.

A quick post today, but this is a story I need to find more out about.   See those orange slings hanging from a buff framework?   I’d noticed it several times recently but never paid attention until yesterday.  It’s not an art installation.

Notice the fine print in blue:  Bayonne Drydock and Repair Corp and Cimolai MBH 1280?  Well, I read that is the current largest mobile boat hoist (aka travel lift) in the world, capable of lifting up to 1280 tons!  That is a big a$$ boat lift!    And Cimolai is building a larger one–a 1500-ton lift– in Florida.

Here’s more on Cimolai, with some NYC projects already completed.  And one more site about Armando and Albina Cimolai  . . . here.

Photos, WVD.

If you’ve never seen one of these lift or splash a boat, here’s a video.

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