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Recognize the skyline in the background . . .the Empire State Building and 432 Park stand out for me.

I’ve done fishing posts before, but a lot of them relate to winter or to fish tugs . . . .  Seeing Mackenzie Paige II and Ruthy L traverse the sixth boro the other evening seemed unusual for me.

It appears they were headed into protected ports along the northside of the Long Island Sound to escape the storm back in the second half of September.

 

In the port of New London, I’m not sure if Mystic Way,

Jolly Roger, and All for Joy all still fish.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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Steel barges rules these days, although a few all wood or partly wood barges still exist as reminders of past stages of technology.  But a glass barge? And reading that it’s sponsored by Corning Museum of Glass …  that could give one pause.

As it turns out, I saw this barge opened up a bit later and took advantage to learn more.

Hot glass was in fact being shaped.

It turns out the “glass barge” is a set of kilns set up on a steel barge;  in summer 2017, the glass barge traveled to three locations in central and western NY state, as

a prep for a glass barge voyage from Brooklyn to Corning next summer.  Click here for a short intro to glass blowing, and here for a much more extensive video.

Wet newspaper . ..  yes, it’s the cheapest effective material for this stage of the process.

While researching this post, I learned that Corning already does glass blowing at sea demos on cruise ships. 

Who knew?  Stay tuned for more info on the glass barge and its visit to NYC in the summer of 2018.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Different day . . . different character . . .  the Hudson can have thick patches of fog, which

allow Dorothy J to slip past structures on a mysterious shore.

Farther along, Miss Gill guards some incongruous piles of

coal that surely did not arrive through the Delaware and Hudson Canal, which I visited recently but didn’t dip my foot into.

Wendell Sea waits alongside a fuel barge, and

Christiana–not a frequent visitor in the sixth boro–does in her own way

up by the GW Bridge.

 

Helen Laraway stands by scows of different sized crushed stone.

And this gets us down to the sixth boro.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Way in the distance where the waterway narrows, that’s lock E-11 and accompanying moveable dam, Amsterdam NY.  Click here for closer-ups of some of the Erie Canal locks and bank scenery.

I saw no names anywhere as this catamaran cut dynamic grooves into a calm river, where I was waiting–in vain–for a vessel in the opposite direction, hoping to get photos of it navigating through the morning mist.  By this time, that mist had dissipated.

Here Bear motorsails westward past Little Gull light . . .

Anyone help with the name of this large sloop in the sixth boro about three weeks back?

It looked to be about 60–70′  . . .

America 2.0 plied harbor waters operations

out of Chelsea Piers.

Off Croton Point, this metallic-looking catamaran headed upriver.

Again, I noticed no name, but the flag could say Bermuda.

Even as the mainsail is lowered, Clearwater is unmistakeable.

And this brings up back up to the Oswego Canal, it’s brigantine St Lawrence II;

her rig conspicuously missing tells me it went on ahead on a truck.  St. Lawrence II here was nearing Oswego.

And to close this out, here are three photos from Lake Erie, late summer.

 

 

All photos recently by Will Van Dorp, who by this time should be back on the St. Lawrence River.

 

I’ve left on another gallivant before “processing” photos from the trip in from Chicago, these being from a portion of the Hudson in various times of day, qualities of light, and types of weather.

Down bound in the port of Albany, we pass Daniel P Beyel, Marie J Turecamo, and –I believe– Comet.

By now, Daniel P is part of the way to Florida.  And I’m intrigued by the units on the dock beyond her stern . . .

…nacelle covers–and I assume the innards–for what looks like 20 wind turbines.  This led me to find out how many wind turbines are currently functional in upstate NY.  I come up with a total of at least 770 as of a year ago: 528 installed since 2006  in the northernmost band from the Adirondacks to the Saint Lawrence Valley, 165 since 2007 in western NY, and 77 since 2000 in central and Southern Tier NY.  Read specifics here.

Treasure Coast loads cement in Albany County, where Lafarge has just dedicated an upgraded facility. 

Pike awaits the next job at Port of Coeymans.

B. No. 225 gets moved northward

by Jane A. Bouchard.

And Tarpon–has to be the only one in the Hudson–moves a fuel barge as well.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

We continue along the Great Coast, now on Lake Erie, a place of

dramatic early morning skies.

And lakers against the canary daybreak.

Calumet has just left the Cuyahoga,

Italcementi Essroc has the very best logo . . .

and Stephen B. Roman has worn it for some time now, as it also has the distinction of being the first vessel to break out of the Toronto winter ice most years.

The engineering department catches some air and ambience entering Cleveland on a late summer evening.

See the hatch in the hull of Buffalo directly below the ladder on the port side?

J. S. St John (1945!) is a sand dredge I’d love to see under way.  I caught these two slightly different angles in Erie PA.

 

And finally, American Mariner–possibly transporting grain to ADM in Buffalo–makes her way into port and up the ship canal after dark sans assistance.  Two details not captured by these photos include the sound of crew opening hatches and the effect of three spotlights picking up a variety of landmarks along its path in.

Here’s the scoop (pun intended!) on the purple lights on the Connecting Terminal elevator.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Whatzit?

Well, six names later (George E. Wood, Russell 9, Martin Kehoe, Peter Spano, Edith Mathiesen, and Philip T. Feeney),

125 years after transforming from hull #7 at Bethlehem Steel Sparrows Point MD, to a Baker-Whiteley Coal co. boat

after many crews lost to time and countless jobs and

lost numbers of miles in salt water and fresh,

and all the ravages of neglect,

sabotage,

and time

scrapped from the bottom yesterday without

upsetting the crane,

Philip T. Feeney is gone.

Closure I hope.

Many thanks to Skip Mildrum for the first photo and the last three.  Click on the other photos to see the tugster post where I first used them.

I observed all this from a public place which some of you will guess–since clues are all over this– but I won’t identify.

Security on the water caught my attention, as

did this large steel mammal swimming

along with the escort.

It was my lucky day.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I could barely make her out, since we were several miles off a shore I was paying attention to for its own sake.  Some closeups taken last year appear at the end of the post, showing Lee A. Tregurtha as she’s put together now, so different from her first lives in the Atlantic and Pacific which could have seen her torpedoed and coral- or something-encrusted in the deeps.

Some major quarrying takes place there, north of Alpena MI,

rendering a +800′ ship almost invisible.

I know I’m exaggerating, but this enterprise leads me to imagine that Lake Huron might be enlarged here until there becomes an Upper Peninsula and a Lower one with a long coastline between Huron Beach and Petoskey,  creating the island of Cheboygan in between and a cable-stayed crossing at Indian River.

Yes, I digress,

but some thousand years from now . . ..

who knows . .

 

So here’s how the fore section of  Lee A. looks today.  She was launched in 1942 as SS Samoset, then six months later acquired by the USN as USS Chiwawa.

Here’s the distinctive stern.

The midsection arrived from Germany in 1960 towed by the tug Zeeland.

For all the details, here’s a tip of the hat to George Wharton and located on boatnerd.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I used to see this as a kid from my first beach while learning to swim.  Those eroded cliffs defined the edge of my world, making me wonder whether they could be an eighth wonder beckoning me to become the discoverer.

I find myself looking at this landscape again, six decades later, and wondering instead what the research boat is probing,

following what appears an erratic path,

past my first lighthouse, which back then I never imagined could be seen from this angle.  Here’s the lighthouse in winter almost a decade back.

Here’s the research boat, RV Kaho, whose christening I attended here three years ago.

Might these be among the bottom features Kaho seeks?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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