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It has suddenly gone from winter to limbo to spring, and that brings folks outside.

Out in small boats, meetings for dock plans,

surveying this strange place called NYC,

keeping bow watch,

racing geese,

or stowing wires . . .

 

 

 

it’s all easier on spring days like this.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here are previous installments focusing on background.

Sometimes the partial reveal and the juxtaposition highlight what’s on the shorelines, like those triple deckers in Bayonne that would blend in perfectly in many 19th century mill towns.

Or the hugely forgotten Singer plant in Elizabeth, hugely forgotten by most residents of Elizabeth, that is.  Imagine, if someone could turn the clock back on that one, 10,000 people would have manufacturing jobs . . . either sewing machines, or

weaponry of all sorts.

 

But one detail on the bank over by the NJ-side of the Bridge caught my attention.  So I thought these beams would be trucked from the disappearing bridge to a scrapping yard.  How surprised I was when the crane lifted the beam off the truck not 1000 feet from where they’d been on duty for decades and

lowered them

one after the other

to what might be a series of trucks below.  I can’t quite see what becomes of the beams on the ground at Bergen Point.  And I think that’s the Passaic small boat.  ??

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  Keep your eyes open and stay safe.

More old steel today and all from Jan van der Doe.  I posted a stern view of the vessel below a few days ago . . . here’s more of the story, as much as I understand.  Between 1944 and 1990, it had German, Belgian, and Dutch owners, both governmental and private.  Since 1990, it’s been owned by Americans who keep it in Rotterdam.

The rest of these photos Jan took in Hamilton ON, and some of the boats

might be in greater jeopardy.  Florence M, Tony MacKay, and James A. Hannah have all been on this blog before, and with some of the same company.  One of these days, they may no longer be there, and they may no longer BE.

I gather these are Carrol C 1 and Bonnie B. from that same 2015 post.

Molly M I works for Nadro Marine and was built in 1962.

William is the name and Bermingham is the company here, and she’s almost 80 years old.   Unrelated:  What material is stored in the domes?

Many thanks to Jan for his updates from Rotterdam and Hamilton.

 

This glossy is not great in itself, but it’s in color and is time stamped, which makes it fantastic.

Here are more of these great photos.  I’m not sure what the ship below is, but the others

are Eugene P. Thomas,

Lebanon, built 1907 and scrapped 1967 . . .

and Diamond Alkali, 1917 to ??

Now this person looks like he had a clear vision and a firm hand on that tiller.

 

Many thanks to Harley R for sending these photos along.  And let’s hope this is a rejuvenating year for the old faded red tug in Lyons.

On a weekend with the theme of rebirth and such, how can Grouper not come up.  She certainly needs someone with a clear vision to hold a steady hand on the tiller…

I took these photos about two months ago, and winter looked like it’d hold everything in place forever then,

 

Here she was hibernating on the Great Lakes several decades ago …

 

But go back even farther . . . she had an illustrious past working with classic vessels . . .

that she outlived.  Click here for a 9-minute video that starts on SS South American’s last day of service in October 1967.

 

What a smart boat!  Triage catches up with everything eventually, but for for the 1912 boat originally called Gary, it’s not time yet, I hope.

Thanks to Harley R for the vintage photos.  There are more to come.

This photo of Godfather should catch someone’s eye, but I’m going to direct that attention then to Paul Johnson’s wonderful site, which if you have an hour to kill, will make that go by in what seems a minute.  Thanks to RG, my brother-in-central-African-1970s-experiences for passing this along.  As to Godfather, she’s by a year or so an older sibling of the boats currently known as Atlantic Salvor and Atlantic Enterprise.  Currently, she’s called Crosby Enterprise.

Here was a surprise . . . Petrel in the sixth boro.  I haven’t seen her in quite a while, since I’m not in Philly much any more.

 

Here’s a head-on view of HMS Justice.

Thanks to Jed, here are some photos from last year showing the mighty Bluefin.

photo date 6 JUNE 2016

with photos taken in Virginia waters.

photo date 6 JUNE 2016

Jan van der Doe has recently returned from a trip to the Netherlands and sends along photos of these tugboats.  Given the stack logo, I’m guessing this one below is a live aboard, and

Alphecca was built in 1913, converted to diesel in 1959 and you can click here to see and hear the engine running.

Below, it’s FairPlay 23, which has appeared on this blog before.

Unrelated:  A reader wrote to ask this question:  “Could you help me find info about a little tug named the Ali M.  My friend SK owned and operated her out of Bayonne for a while and sold her before his passing many years ago.  I believe he had her at the Atlas Yacht club.  I was curious what ever happened to her.”            I don’t recall ever seeing a tug named Ali M.  Anyone help out here?  Anyone have a photo?

The reader is also looking for any info on the vessels shown below in a painting by his father from the 1990s.  Thanks for any help.

Thanks to RG, Jed, Jan, and Peter for sending these along.  And be careful out there.

Petrel and HMS Justice photos by Will Van Dorp.

or Bridge.

Below is a photo I took in October 2011 . . .

Also from October 2011, when the bridge looked like this,

squeezing under the roadbed looked like this, and

the McAllister stern quarter escort looked like this . . .

the mighty Maurania III, that is.  Here’s the complete post I did back then.

But five and a half  years have elapsed, not without change.  So earlier this week, Suez Canal in the KVK and under the Bayonne Bridge looked like this.  See the worker above the new roadbed?

See him now?

 

So this week it was Marjorie B on the stern, and

 

Ellen forward.

 

 

I hope to be around and doing this five and a half years from now to see what there is to see.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Yesterday I mentioned the request to help the Roaring Bull ferry project, and that’s now fully funded. Thank you.   Here’s another and more somber request that you might consider, the Captain Joseph Turi Memorial fund.

Sometimes posts just write themselves, like this one.  After seeing someone else post a photo of a large tugboat named Abundance and a barge named Stymie, I had to follow suit.  I tried unsuccessfully to find what or where Densa is.

Arctic Breeze as a spring morning dawns?

Ah . . . the good lord DOES have a village named for him upstate along the Erie Canal . . . , a village that’s also associated with other noteworthy folks.

Here I have a serious question . . .  is there a seacoast town anywhere where high school girls vie for this title as they do for such titles as Miss Apple Blossom?  Click here for some other crazy contests . . .

Oops . . I shot the photo too early.  Here’s a closer up view of what Michael Miller is pushing.

And if there’s a Suez Canal in the Kill Van Kull, might there be a Kill Van Kull in the Suez Canal?

And finally . . . do you remember Roaring Bull?  Well, they are a struggling ferry operation over Susquehanna, great people with a long history.  Maybe you can contribute some of your tax refund now and take a ride on the ferry later this summer.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Scrapper 1 focused on loading scrap from scows onto a bulker anchored in the Upper Bay.  Since then many posts, such as this one, have shown loaded scows pushed hither and yon in the harbor, and like this one, even down an ice-encrusted river.

Today’s post features a unit and a crew heading out bright and early to load scrap that once was the machinery of daily life.  In the shot below, I get the sense that the heat exhausting out the stack has just erased a segment of the Bayonne Bridge roadbed, cauterizing it.

Cauterizing is an extreme first aid term I’ve read about and grateful I’ve never had to perform.

I use the term here because this crew, small company, and 1960 machinery engaged in commerce illustrate how like a single organism really are the sixth boro and by extension the supply chain they fit so smoothly within.

Happy harvest, gentlemen.

All the rest could not happen without your part being played.

All photos and sentiments strictly by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here are previous installments of this title.  Marjorie B hurries alongside the container ship to assume position

closer to the bow, froth sprayed back by the head-on wind.

As they make their way through the gap,

all is lined up for the tight turn to starboard.

By the way, did you notice the landing net?

Well did you?  Actually I hadn’t either until later.

See the landing net stacked above the portside of Marjorie B?

Let’s roll back to a close up of the second photo, and there it is.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s always amazed by all the details I miss until I go back and look at the photos.

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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