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I’m working on some tougher posts, but here’s an easy one.  Let’s flip the calendar back approximately 10 years, give or take a month.  Then it was Barents Sea, not Atlantic Enterprise.  Rowan M. McAllister is still around, although in Charleston SC.  And the container ship under the “un-raised” Bayonne Bridge is Zim Qingdao, currently eastbound across the Atlantic.  The other McAllister tug I don’t know.

Melvin E. Lemmerhirt, now Evelyn Cutler, eastbound toward the Brooklyn Bridge  . . . well, all’s quite changed about all this.

Maryland –I’ve yet to see her as  Liz Vinik–was bunkering the brand new Queen Victoria.

Peking was then–as now–out of the water, although currently her dry dock is in Germany.

Penn No. 4 still goes by the same name, but it’s now a Kirby boat.

George Burrows was never a regular here, and I’ve no idea of her current disposition.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes you enjoyed this backward glance.

 

Here was the first in this series of titles, from almost seven years ago.

The barge with green containers, the bridge, and the Glovis roll on-roll off (RORO) vessel all look great bathed

in January morning light,

a bit of wolf moon light thrown in as well.

I don’t know if this RORO has called here before, but she is less than a year old,  

and you can tell.

She leaves our fair city for Tema, Ghana.  I’d love to see her in tropical light.  Anyone there reading this?

And here’s the FLOFLO for today, this common goldeneye who flew onto this water and will flow off north when the days lengthen and the sun gets hotter.   The last other type of FLOFLO–the one that floated Peking out– was documented here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s eager to hear from folks in Ghana on this vessel.

“irrespective of operating conditions, all vessels must be clear of the Montreal-Lake Ontario section [of the St. Lawrence Seaway]  at 12:00 hours on December 31st, [2017].” quoted from Seaway Notice No. 26–2017

Above and below, Leonard M and Ocean A. Simard struggling to extricate Federal Biscay, as seen from Robinson Bay, on January 6, in temperatures double digits below zero, Fahrenheit.

Yet, here we are as of earlier this morning in the areas east and west of the Snell Lock [between groups 3 and 4].  Green AIS symbols are ships, all down bound, and aqua are tugs, assisting in that effort.   Key follows.  Check this news update from Massena NY on boatyard.com for January 8.

1  Pacific Huron.  It had grounded farther upstream in late December.

2  Performance and Robinson Bay

3  Federal Biscay and Ocean A. Simard.  Federal Biscay precipitated this delay, when it got stuck in Snell Lock last week.  It was freed Saturday. 

4  Billeborg, Beatrix, and Mitiq

5  Ocean Tundra and Martha L. Black

This should make for interesting story to follow on AIS or on FB group St. Lawrence River Ship Watchers.

Leo Ryan’s Maritime Magazine comments on the gold-headed cane ceremony each January in Montreal honoring the first ship into port of Montreal each year.  There should be a similar “recognition” of the last ship out of the Seaway.  Name suggestions, anyone?  Definitely there should be recognition of the efforts of the tug and ice breakers crews ensuring that the last ship gets out.  For some reason, I recall a kid’s book . . . The Story About Ping.

Many thanks to Nathan Jarvis for the top two photos and assistance with information.  The photo below I’m not sure who to credit to, but it shows Robinson Bay‘s efforts to extricate Federal Biscay last week.

And as of 10:54 today…

Federal Biscay and Pacific Huron are competing to be Ping;  the others are downstream following Black and Tundra.

Here was a related post, Yano, watched by John Watson and me simultaeously and from different vantage points, each of us unbeknownst to the other.

Before the snow and cold hit this past week, actually Wednesday Jan 4, I was tipped off about an impending BDD dry dock exit in Bayonne.  And when James E. Brown grasps the door–think of it as a plug–that confirms something will be floating out.

To the extreme left,  see the plug, and Capt. Brian A. McAllister positions itself on the stern of USNS Soderman.

Ellen has the starboard stern quarter, and

Eric has a line on the bow.  For a point-by-point comparison of Eric and the Moran 6000s, click here.

 

Note how the ship dwarfs the lighthouse, and

the harbor dwarfs the ship,

almost entirely obscuring Alex standing by.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whom wonders if anyone’s going to get photos of Millville and 1964 in the anchorage today.  I’m tied up.

Here are previous posts in this series, and here’s probably the most dramatic set of photos ever from Paul, taken January seven years ago.

Below, that’s the view of the mouth of the Rondout . . . . and the light at the end of the north breakwater, which looks so beautiful here.

Here’s a view along the deck of Cornell, when

Frances was about to pass, headed north on the Hudson,

which looks like the concrete parking lot of an abandoned shopping mall.

 

 

But commerce goes on, Katherine Walker on station

and Haggerty Girls moving heating oil.

Daisy Mae, however, is making her maiden voyage home, up to Coeymans.

Many thanks to Paul Strubeck, who sent me these photos as soon as he thawed out from the trip.

And completely unrelated, I just added a new blog to my blogroll, GirlsAtSea, started this month by a Romanian bridge officer named Diane.  Check it out here or from the blogroll.

 

Click on the photo below and you’ll see basic details of 1979-built LNG carrier LNG Virgo.  

Click on the image below, and you’ll find a 9-minute video with details of a boatload of refugees rescued by LNG Virgo in the South China Sea and what happens 30+ years later.

Lauren Vuong, one of those refugees, writes:  “I was seven years old when my family was rescued from the South China Sea in June 1980.  We were part of the “Boat People” crisis.  We were ten days at sea, lost and depleted of food, water and fuel.  Barring a miracle, death was an imminent certainty.  That miracle appeared in the form of a liquefied natural gas carrier flying the American flag, LNG Virgo, an image that forever cemented itself in my mind as being synonymous with life and freedom.”

Lauren, now making a documentary about their rescue, has a GoFundMe site if you want to help.  Recently Lauren was at SUNY Maritime at an LNG conference.

Lauren’s story reminds me of an email I got a few years back and shared here;  it involves a rescue conducted by a tug that went on to work in the sixth boro.

 

Twin Cities tug North Carolina (1952)  breaking ice.  Next two photo thanks to Paul Scinocca on FB.    As I said yesterday, fresh water reacts differenttly than salt water to extreme temperatures.

American Mariner in Twin Cities Ports (Duluth MN and Superior WI)  harbor on what has to be the last run of the season.  Thanks again to Paul.  Here’s more on recent temperatures in the Twin Ports.  Click here for photos I took in Twin Ports a half year ago.

And here, from the FB group Erie Shipping News, a photo (l to r)  of tug New York (and Dorothy Ann and Elizabeth Anna) from December in Erie PA,

and from a few days ago . . .  .  Here’s more on recent weather in Erie. GL tug New York is over 100 years old.

Thanks to the folks at Erie Shipping News and Paul Scinocca in Duluth for this glimpse of early January elsewhere.

You can read  Ice 5 or 3 or 2.  But freezing temperatures in salt water look different than in fresh water, salt ice not like lake ice, which is a topic for tomorrow. The sixth boro low temperature in the first two days of January was well above 0 F, Maine and Minnesota well into the double digits negative F, and Anchorage, a balmy 46 ABOVE, warmer than places in Florida!

But I digress, cold is cold and uncomfortable.  Polar bear plunge notwithstanding, a strong swimmer won’t last a minute in this water.

 

But work goes on . . .

with extra layers

and precautions.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who really postponed admitting the new year had arrived because–dangerously– it was more comfortable thinking otherwise.

 

aka I’m off script, doing junkster instead of tugster…  This is like hitting the snooze button for another few precious minutes of sleep.

Besides,  I found this wall of old Detroit steel, some painted up like bricks in the wall.  Scrapping is a necessity, but here’s to preserves like this.

Given some pesky dark ghosts annoying me, I’m buoyed by playfulness here,

just scrappable cars piled up and painted

a splash of spring colors in winter.  Too many other places of scrap hint at the terror that left them there; that’s not here.

 

Someone had fun here once.

Let’s sport about . . .

let’s sign on with a program to get this year going . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose time in the grove teaches resolve that distinguishes us from bears, turtles, bees, and other critters that hibernate; as well as learning that his preference is for shooting outdoor painted or rusty metal rather than feathers, scales, rock, stars, skin, or fur.

Related:  Here’s a place to add to the must-visit list.

I went to bed early, never heard all the hoop-la, and see no need to change calendars yet.  I’m sticking far inland in the grove of the tree of knowledge.  It’s not that I have bad feelings about the new year;  rather, I have no feelings, no expectations, no resolve.  Eagerness might come tomorrow, or aging may have stifled it forever, obscuring the ways ahead as pine needles have these once-fine automobiles,

only a hint reveals here or there.

Maybe in a few days, after I put the new calendars up, things’ll get as defined as these shapes.  Identify this beauty?  Answers follow so that you can guess, that is, if you want to linger in this grove, as I certainly do.

Wandering in this grove, I’m looking back to get a sense of going forward.  And what I really see is what Jacek Yerka can render.  I even posted a grove car photo referring to him back almost six years ago.  You’re guessing the make and year of these machines, right?

Some of these shapes I can recall and associate with friends now lost, and

others challenge my memory.

Some could be dusted off and running in less than an hour,

and others . . . maybe need cutting loose from the vines, and

then some  . . . have been doomed by clueless work, ill-informed priorities.

More soon, if Will Van Dorp, who took these photos, decides he can postpone 2018 a bit more and stay in temporal limbo.

Oh, Here are IDs, at least my guesses, skipping over the truly unidentifiable, imho:  1953 Studebaker 2D Commander, 1953 Buick Roadmaster, 1961 Buick LeSabre, 1961 Borgward Isabella, 1938 Ford firetruck, 1941 Ford Deluxe

 

 

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