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Naming the setting is easy, but can you name this tug?  I thought it was Emerald Coast with a modified paint job.

It’s a newbie in town from the Harley Gulf fleet, appropriately named Lightning, given that sky. .

Iron Salvor I’d seen before, but at the dock.  The other day she loaded some fuel at the IMTT pump.  Her intriguing history was commented on here from two months ago.

I don’t believe I’ve seen Kodi before.

She comes from across Raritan Bay, from Belford.

Let’s mix things up with a photo from about 10 years ago . . . Swift, a 1958 tug out of New Haven.

I’ve never seen Miss Circle Line away from the dock, but getting this photo on a stroll along the Hudson the other day led me to discover (maybe again) that she’s a 1955 product of Matton’s shipyard, although she doesn’t appear on this shipyard list, unless my eyes fail me or the list is incomplete.

To go over to Europe, from Jed . . . it’s Union 5. 

photo date 15 JUNE 2017

And a rare shot from Jed, it’s Japanese tug Azusa.  Since then, she’s been sold to Indian concerns and operates as Ocean Marvel out of the port of Krishnapatnam.  Scroll down on that link to see a drawing of elephants being loaded . . . likely more than a half century ago.

photo date 16 Jan 2008

And in closing, here’s Decker and Matilda, photo I took on May 26, 2008.  Where does the time go?

Thanks to Jed for use of his photos, many more of which are in the hopper.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

I still have lots of these. If I were to spend money for a boat and lived in a place where I could walk to it every day, I’d get a fish tug.  All boats today are within a three-minute walk of the market at Bodin Fisheries.

Let’s start with the 1938 Ruth, which has become a static display at the Bayfield Marine Museum, which–to my disappointment– was closed when I visited.

Noree Jo was built in 1948.

Let’s have a look from all angles.

 

Cassie-K is slightly older, a 1945 boat.

John R seems to have gone to the birds . . . She’s from 1942.

 

The smaller red-hulled boat beside John R gave no clue of her name.

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She was still self-propelled and earning cargo credit in September 5, 2017, when I saw her near Mackinac Island . . .

 

Ditto two days later in windsor and a bit later

she was running down bound past Wyandotte,

allowing me a close-up of her oxidation.

But today, thanks to Fred Miller II for these photos, she’s down bound again, but behind a tow line of Evans McKeil, with

tail steering provided by the iconic Cheyenne.

Many thanks to Fred for the last two photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

How about some irony:  Evans McKeil, shown here n Montreal in October 2017 with barge Metis,

was built in Balboa, Panama in 1936!!  Algoway‘s keel was laid in 1972 in Collingwood, and she’s headed out for scrapping in Turkey.

Cheyenne has appeared on this blog many, many times, most recently after I caught her in the Oswego River in September 2017 as she headed for Detroit.

 

 

 

Rt Hon Paul E. Martin called here before a month over three years ago, that time carrying the same type of cargo.

I took these photos yesterday, and believe it or not, I felt only a few drops of rain.

The Martin is the second self-unloader to call in the sixth boro in three days, which must be some sort of a record.

Eric and Bruce did a magnificent job of spinning the bulker around.

Once spun around, foot by foot she was moved with precision to the dock.

 

To get this cargo here, Martin traveled three weeks and transited the Panama Canal.

 

Can anyone tell me the meaning of the “10H VOID” marking just below the name and CSL class of the freighter and the “VOID7” marking just above the water line?

And where is Morro Redondo, you ask?  It’s on the island of Cedros, a bit over 300 miles SSE of San Diego, CA.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Until an hour before posting, there were two Canadian self-unloaders in our harbor, which is truly remarkable.  Algoma Integrity, as of posting, is not even 10 nm outside the Narrows.

 

What is it?  Well, to take inspiration from billboards,

I’d say “watch this space.”

Or from t-shirts . . . . “keep calm and pay attention.”

I think the red and yellow here belongs to Jane A. Bouchard, seen here almost a decade ago, but

for the alabaster white, stay tuned.  Come on back soon.  Pay attention.  Stay focused.  Be alert.

All photos today thanks to Lisa Kolibabek, whose previous contributions can be seen here.

 

I’ve posted enough photos of “lakers” that you might know what they look like.  In fact, I posted a photo of “queen of the lakes” only a few days ago. So the photos today below are the reason I’m late posting.

Note the self-unloader.  This gear gives these boats enhanced versatility, as they can unload wherever, and fast.

Note the logo.  “Algoma Central Corporation owns and operates the largest fleet of dry and liquid bulk carriers operating on the Great Lakes – St. Lawrence Waterway.”  That’s a quote from here.

And here’s the answer . . . Algoma Integrity is doing Alice‘s run for now, and is therefore operating in salt water. I last saw her upriver of Montreal last fall.

Back in April another self-unloader came to the sixth boro . . . CSL Frontier.

I’m posting a bit late today because I had an  idee fixe of what the post should be.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I’ve been holding on to these photos until my article came out online, which happened yesterday.  You can read it here. For sixth boro watchers or astute followers of this blog, what do you notice about the vessel–Maria Energy–centered as it enters the chamber at Cocoli?  Answer follows.

 

 

What Cerro Ancon is doing above, and Cerro Grande below would be done by locomotives, aka “mules” here and here in the 1914 parts of the Canal, still functioning of course.  Originally these locomotives were made–where else?–in Schenectady.  Here’s a then-and-now look at Canal locomotives.  The current mules come from Japan.  Here’s more.

 

The switch to tugs only involves, as you might guess, some familiarization, which is the topic of my next article, not yet out online.

The photos above and below show more differences between the 1914 locks and the ones that opened in 2016, referred to as the “third set.”  The new gates roll and the water saving basins do just that . . .  saving 60% of the water for each lockage.

In the distance beyond Maria Energy, you can see ships in the Miraflores locks.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  And the connection with the sixth boro?  Maria Energy is part of the TEN fleet . . . which includes the handymax tanker Afrodite.

 

 

Just east of the dock featured a few days ago here is another dock.

Eleanor B might be among the “newest” of the fish tugs I’ve seen, 1950.  Click here for photos of her christening at Peterson Brothers in Sturgeon Bay and more.

In the same fleet colors–I think–and two years older than Eleanor B is Twin Sisters, a trap net boat.  If my info is correct, she was once known as Sue Carol.

Kristin Beth  . .  .I can’t find any info about her.  I’m wondering if the shelter forward is original or a repurposed portion of an old boat.

Crews were mostly working on the three boats above, even though I caught these photos without them.  Obviously, no one earns money when the boat’s at the dock.    There were boats–fish tugs–moving toward and away from the docks, like this unidentified one, and

this one, Gary.  If I may borrow from “the fish tug” site, here’s their info on all the modifications done to Gary: “GARY 247461 .Built by Burger Boat Co. in 1945, for William Yauger, Jr., Algoma, Wis. The 40 ft. x 11 ft. steel hulled fish tug was equipped with a 45-54 hp. Kahlenberg oil engine. The cabin was of wood, over steel frames, with pilot house mid-ship. Yauger was owner until 1951, when she was sold to Canadian owners, and renamed BARRY MCKAY. In 1962 the boat came back to the U.S., retained her original name, and was owned by William Heward, Rogers City, Mich., until 1969. Bought by Gilmore Peterson, Bayfield, the Kahlenberg was removed, and a Cummins diesel installed. The wood cabin was replaced with steel, and the pilot house moved to the stern. Gilmore sold the boat to his nephew, Michael Peterson, who still has ownership.”

Boats came and went at the dock.  An arrival was Thomas C. Mullen, a 1946 Burger built boat.  Click on the link in the previous sentence for info on all her modifications since 1946.   I may have mentioned this before, but Burger–still in Manitowoc–has built many vessels since 1863.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who plans many more posts on fish tugs and is fully to blame for any errors in info here.

Following on the photos from April 29 and May 19, here is finale for Tender 6 and Reliable of Utica.  As of this posting, they are 2.5 nautical miles off Shinnecock and 80′ down, precisely placed and not sunk.  My guess is that soon this section of this chart will be updated.

Here is the last daylight for

Tender 6.

Here’s the final journey

 

for Reliable

of Utica.

Thanks for use of these photos to a generous gentleman. More photos can be seen here.

 

This road trip was partly about seeing more fish tugs, the focus of the next few posts.  One of the current hubs of fishing tugs still fishing is the Bayfield Peninsula, jutting out of northern Wisconsin into Lake Superior.  Bayfield still had chunk ice in the harbor on May 9!

Let’s start out at Bodin Fisheries, and the docks there.

Visible here from l to r, it’s Miss Madilynn, JJC, Twin Disc, and Alicia Rae.

And circling around to the other side, more views from different angles of this set.

Mackenzie May, partly visible here,  is astern of Miss Madilynn.

Looking out of the cove, that’s Madeline Island–the only inhabited island of the Apostles–visible only when the fog is lifted.  Part of the island is home to the Bad River band of the Ojibwe.

But back to the fish tugs.  Note JayJayCee is abridged on the stack.

A major resource I use to learn more about fish tugs is here, compiled by Harvey Hadland and Bob Mackreth.  A second one is Great Lakes Commercial Fishing Forum here.

Miss Madilynn might be the newest of this set, built (I believe) in 1964 in Black River Harbor MI.  Previous names are Isle Royale Queen, Jean-Maur-B II, and Jean Mor B.   She’s 31′ loa.

Mackenzie May was built in 1940 at Burger Boat, 42′ loa.  The Burger family has been building boats since 1863 in Manitowoc WI.

Twin Disc, 45′ loa, carries the original name as when she was built in Sturgeon Bay by Peterson in 1937.  

Alicia Rae was built as C. W. Lind in 1945. The 42′ boat was also once called Kelly.  She was built as hull 209 at Sturgeon Bay Shipbuilding  & Drydock. 

 

I skipped the Garden Peninsula on my drive out to Bayfield, but from George Schneider a few years back, here’s a fish tug he photographed there.

All photos by will Van Dorp, who takes the blame for any mis-processed info here.

Click here for a short video on commercial fishing on Lake Superior.

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