You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘photos’ category.

Here’s an index for the previous in the series.

I got this photo in July 2003 in Oswego, the 1943 Bushey tug  WYTM-71 Apalachee.  I haven’t seen it since, although it was at one time in Cleveland.  Anyone know if it’s still there?

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Here’s another Great Lakes tug, for now.  This photo of James A. Hannah was taken by Jan van der Doe in Hamilton harbor in late May 2015.  I posted it here then in this larger context.  And here in February 2012, thanks to Isaac Pennock.  Now I knew that James (LT-820, launched July 1945) was a sister to Bloxom (LT-653) and that the Hannah fleet had been sold off in 2009 in a US Marshal’s sale, but I hadn’t known until yesterday that the CEO of the Hannah fleet–Donald C. Hannah–was Daryl C. Hannah’s father!!  That Daryl Hannah!  But it gets even better, there once was a towboat named Daryl C. Hannah!  Anyone know what became of it?  Last I could find, it was on the bank of the Calumet River used as an office.  Updates?

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As you can tell, this photo was taken in the East River.  It was July 2009 that Marjorie B. McAllister escorts Atlantic Superior as it heads for sea.  Any ideas where Atlantic Superior is today?   Actually, I know this one . . . after a long and eventful life, she powered herself over to China this year to be scrapped.

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I haven’t seen Bismarck Sea here in quite a while, but last I knew, she was operating in the Pacific Northwest.

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King Philip . . . went to Ecuador around 2012; Patriot Service is still working in the Gulf of Mexico, I believe.

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And to round out this glance back, here’s a list of WW2 vessels still operating at the time of its compilation.  Many thanks to aka Fairlane for putting it together.

Thanks to Jan van der Doe for the Hannah photo;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

By the way, it was rewatching The Pope of Greenwich Village that got me to wonder about Daryl Hannah.

This follows the post where I got to spend four times as long on Long Island Sound, a truly remarkable place.  The trip last week brought sights and surprises enough to warrant a repeat trip soon.  Here, a bait boat (?) passes a renowned Plum Island facility.  Back to this later in the post.

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We’re headed to New London, the name of this RORO/WOWO.

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Here Marjorie McAllister tows RTC 60 past Little Gull Light.

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The only house on Hobbs Island in Groton needed to have a story, and I found one when I learned it was built by the Hays family, who wrote this book a friend gave me for my 45th birthday.

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Here Mary Ellen departs New London for Orient Point, passing New London Light.

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Amistad awaits, for sale at the dock.

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Sea Jet  . . . takes on passengers for Block Island, a place I need to visit soon.

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Since our destination was Blount for the wind farm vessel ribbon cutting, I wanted to get a photo of the newly launched replacement for Capt. Log.   Click here to see the plans and specs.

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Chandra B, coming to the sixth boro soon.

At the dock just south of the I-95 bridge, it’s 100′ scalloper Chief, also for sale.

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Electric Boat 2 does patrols around the pens,

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which enclose a submarine.  Now look closely at the tail vertical stabilizer.  Now look at the one in this “news” story about a submarine getting stuck in Shinnecock Canal.  If not the same sub, then it’s at least the same type.

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But if you start thinking about it, Dan’s is having way too much fun.  This story and this one are clearly boaxes, spoofs about boats.  When I heard the story about Shinecock, I thought maybe the Hamptons PD had gotten ahold of this one, which I spotted on the North fork just a few summer months ago.

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Heading back across to Orient Point, you can line up New London Ledge Light with Race Rock Light, in the distance.   Tours for Ledge are available in the summer, when the ghost is around.

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On a leg between Newport and Oyster Bay, it’s KnickerbockerWisconsin-built by a shipyard that started out doing fish tugs!  If you’re not familiar with fish tugs–of which Urger was one–go to Harvey Hadland‘s site.

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Now here, back near Plum Island, is a surprise.  I figured it was a fishing party boat, but Justin suggested otherwise, and indeed he was right.  M. S. Shahan II IS a government boat, owned by Department of Homeland Security!!

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And a final shot of Plum Island just before we return to the Orient Point dock, of course, it’s Cape Henlopen, former USS LST 510

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By the way, I am still looking for folks with connection to this vessel as LST-510.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

“Black gold”  . . . oil makes power.   You can’t see or smell wind, but it can be used for power . . . and that’s the title of this post.  Yesterday’s photos hinted at the work happening now in the water to eventually harvest that power, and today . . . this records parts of the ribbon-cutting for

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the first North American-built wind farm service vessel.

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Completion for this 70’6″ x 24′ x 4′  vessel is projected for April, although crews will be training on similar vessels in the UK starting this coming winter.

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Hull and superstructure are being worked on separately.

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To the left is Marcia Blount, CEO of Blount, and speaking here is Charles A. Donadio Jr., owner of Rhode Island Fast Ferry.

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Over 150 people attended the event.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Click here by Kirk Moore for Workboat.

 

What is this?

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How about a little more of the same shot?  Now can you guess?  Cashman is a familiar New England company .  . . but that tug, Todd Danos, is not exactly a name known in these parts.

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Have you figured out the location?  Dace Reinauer and Senesco are the best clues here. Of course, this is the Narragansett Bay.

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Weeks tugs Robert and

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Elizabeth sometimes work in the sixth boro . . . as here in June 2012.

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“Invisible gold” is the term used at the event below–subject of tomorrow’s post.  The speaker to the right is Jeffrey Grybowski, CEO of Deepwater Wind, the project to place wind turbines in +70′ of water southeast of Block Island.  It’s happening now, and all the photos in this post–except the one below–were taken in July and early August by Nate Lopez.

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And providing supply and crew support to get “steel in the water” are Rosemary Miller and

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Josephine K. Miller.

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Again many thanks to Nate for these photos.  More on this project in tomorrow’s post.

 

 

For as multipurpose as sixth boro waterways are in summertime, my perception is that safety prevails.  RORO, barge on a short wire, and canoe stay well apart.

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Ditto here with spacing.

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PWCs . .  I’ll never be a fan.

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Foreshortening masks the fact that from a vantage point like Fort Wadsworth . . . I can see over 10 miles.

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The traditional ship here was launched in 1997;  the tug beyond  . . . in 2001.

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My only question is where that classy yellow sand is going.  TZ Bridge?

All photos recently by Will Van Dorp.

 

More photos by taken by Jan Oosterboer showing traffic quite different from what you’d see on our parts of the watery globe.

Let’s start with Matador 3.  With the North Sea as the densest area of the globe for offshore wind turbines, floating cranes like this–with lift capacity of 1800 tons– keep busy.

0aaaaoe1MATADOR 3, Wilhelminahaven, Schiedam, met compressor-0227

And Wei Li . . . self-propelled and with lift capacity of 3000 tons.  Before we move to a different type of vessel, do you remember Pelicano from Guanabara Bay?

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Seven Rio is a recent launch . . . deep sea pipe layer.

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Kolga, the larger tugboat here, is 236′ x 59,’ yet

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it’s dwarfed by its tow, crane vessel Hermod, with two cranes whose lift capacity surpasses 8000 tons.

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K. R. V. E. 61 is a highly visible crew tender.

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Here’s another view of Hermod.

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SD Sting Ray (104′ x 39′) is like a mouse at a foot of an elephant here,

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the elephant being Stena Don, a Stena drill rig.

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Many thanks to Jan Oosterboer for these photos which came via Fred Trooster.

Day 1. May 11, 2015.

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Later on Day 1

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Day 37, refueling near Gibraltar.

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Day 48, Belfast

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Yesterday, day 92 . . . south of the 59th Street Bridge, and

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cadets showing their sea legs by climbing to novel places!

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Still later yesterday . . . passing alongside Roosevelt Island, and almost home.

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Credits . . .  Steve Munoz, Tommy Bryceland and friends, Tony Acabono, Jonathan Steinman, Laura Seeholzer, a few secret salts, a communicative kraken, and Will Van Dorp . . . in no particular order.

Click here for photos of TS Empire State departing the sixth boro in May, here for her being towed into dry dock 10 months ago, and here for her return from Summer Term back in 2010.

Here’s another set of recent photos, all taken by Jan Oosterboer, and all showing traffic quite different from what you’d see on our side of the A-Ocean.

Start with these four tugs, three by Fairmount.  In the lead, it’s Fairmount Expedition, rated at 16320 bhp, and 205 ton bollard pull.   She’s Japan-built 2007.

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Second in that line, FairPlay 33, 8160 bhp,  is Romania-built 2011, likely constructed in the yard where Allie B towed the old Quincy Goliath crane.

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Check the Fairmount link above for the particulars on Alpine and

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Sherpa.

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Union Sovereign, 2003 and China built and rated at 16500 bhp.

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Going from chartreuse to primer red . . . .this is a multicat shallow draft vessel built in Gdansk to be completed in greater Rotterdam.  Click here and here to see how this vessel gets launched.

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The unfinished multicat is towed here by Egesund, a tug that could most easily fit in in the sixth boro.   The offset house allows more deck equipment to be fitted.

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And finally . . . above and below, it’s Norman Flipper, 2003 and Norway built.

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These photos by Jan Oosterboer come via Fred Trooster, to whom both I am grateful.

From George Conk . . . it’s Ahoskie, taken in Rockland, Maine.

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from Jonathan Steinman, it’s Franklin Reinauer at sunrise on the East River, passing under–I guess-the Manhattan Bridge.

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From Allen Baker, earlier this week, it’s Eagle, once again in the sixth boro.

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From Bjoern Kils . . . it’s Kalmar Nyckle . . . taken by his mom in Lewes, DE.

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From Zwaan Casasnuevas, it’s Half Moon in her current berth in Hoorn, NL, one stormy day last week.

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From eBay and identified only by date, a view from 1946 featuring Chancellor and an unknown tug, probably NYC.  Anyone help with identification?

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And finally from the same ethereal realms, it’s an unidentified Dalzell tug,

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Thanks to George, Jonathan, Allen, Zwaan, Bjoern, and the webworldlings .. .

Here was the first in this series.  I’d also thought of this as prodigal ferry.  Strangely enough, the Staten Island ferries travel all the way to Colonna Shipyard in Norfolk for maintenance.

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Molinari returns!

 

Towed by Eileen McAllister, Molinari returned this morning.  Note the twin lights near Sandy Hook in the background.

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Standing by here, it’s Charles D. McAllister.

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I’d heard once that a wooden “dam” was built on the bow of the ferry to keep water from coursing through during these open-sea transits, but that’s not the case here.  Notice the missing lifeboat?

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Once inside the Narrows, Charles D gets a line on the stern.

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I’m told Newhouse will be next to visit Colonna.  Does anyone know if there’s a “riding crew” on the ferry for these transits?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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