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Here’s a collage of images as my last roundup 2013 post:

a half dozen working tugboats and a covered barge as seen looking east from the Second Street Bridge,

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a swimmer in the water either doing a northern style Richard Halliburton re-enactment or setting out to do an underwater survey mission as the lock is –unbeknownst to her–about to open,

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(For more complete info on what’s going on here with the swimmer, check this post by bubbling-blowing bowsprite.)

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my possible future employer shoehorning an Eriemax passenger vessel into the first lock in the flight,

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waterdogs go fishing,

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Onrust resplendant,

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a Dutch barge,

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Urger dried out for some emergency surgery along

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with Tappan Zee II,

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Eighth Sea and Bill’s exercise machine,

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Stu’s Dragonfly,

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the pilot’s understanding of the pushoff contest,

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and in Troy, some public art designed to assist memory . . .  the Soldier’s and Sailor’s Monument with goddess Columbia blowing her horn high above Troy, as seen from Tug44.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  See you in Waterford in 2014, I hope.

Late October 2011, Day Peckinpaugh and Frances Turecamo float above Lock 3, post-Irene, seen here through the eyes of the master of Tug44.

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Here’s Day Peckinpaugh last weekend, nose to nose with Urger, the latter here for shaft work.

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It’s unknown when if ever the DP will operate again.  Here and here are previous posts with the Eriemax bulk carrier.

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Blount’s two decade old Grande Caribe applies the same design to contemporary passenger cruising.  Notice the popped-down house;  in this post from three years ago, the house is up. I’d love to hear from someone who’s sailed on one of these “small ship adventures.”  Shipboard romance?  What are the stopping off places for adventuring off the mother ship?

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And compare the tug Frances Turecamo (1957) in the top foto to her incarnation now.  It’s great to see her back at work.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  Thanks to Jonathan Boulware , interim president of South Street Seaport  Museum, for passing along  this article and video of salvage of Astrid.

What’s this?  Where?  Answer follows.  It’s not really sepia per se, just an approximation.

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I took this foto a week ago, then stripped out the color.  It’s Yemitzis, the former

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PRR Philadelphia, launched 1954.  Major modifications have happened between the two incarnations.

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Here’s another foto I took last week, Resolute.  With its ample pudding, it’s a perfect candidate to be sepia-fied.

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The top foto was taken by Fred Wehner a few days ago;  that’s not Rosie the riveter but Capt. Wendy Marble, working to prep her vessel  Urger, for the 2013 season.  Here, here, and here are some full color fotos previously featuring Urger, who initially looked like this over a century ago.

Thanks to Paul Strubeck for the foto of PRR Philadelphia.

My library for the time period  January 1, 2012 until today contains 11,244 fotos.  Starting from tomorrow, any 2012 fotos will be taken along the road.  So I decided to choose ONE foto per month, quite subjectively and without regard for this foto having previously been featured here.  I don’t claim these are the best of the month. Only 12 fotos, one per month.

January, Sandmaster . . .  waiting to refuel.  Today, Dec 22 . . .  Sandmaster was out there doing what it usually does, mining sand.

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February . . . Eagle Beaumont escorted in the Arthur Kill by Charles D. McAllister.

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March . . . side by side, CSAV Suape and bulker Honesty, Pacific bound through the Miraflores locks, demonstrating graphically what panamax means.

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April . . . red-trimmed Taurus west bound on the KVK, cutting past Advance Victoria.  And just today, I saw Taurus, now blue-trimmed, heading north between Manhattan and Jersey City.

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Choosing just one foto per month is tough, but for May, here’s Swan packed and almost ready to go hulldown toward Africa with these specimens of the Crowley, Reinauer, and Allied fleets.

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June . . . Weeks Shelby tows shuttle Enterprise from JFK toward Manhattan.

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July and an unforgettable 4th using Pegasus as subject under the rocket’s glare

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August . . . and coal-fired Badger heads into the sunset . . . and Wisconsin.

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September, and a parade of vessels including Urger and Buffalo leave the Federal Lock bound for Waterford.   My inimitable platform here is Fred’s Tug44.

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At the start of the Great Chesapeake Schooner race, crew is setting sail on the unique tugantine Norfolk Rebel.  In the distance, it’s Pride of Baltimore 2.

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Coming into the home stretch from Montreal, it’s Atlantic Salvor delivering segments of the WTC1 antenna.

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And December . . .  it’s Stena Primorsk looming over the USCG vessels.   At this time, Stena Primorsk was impatient to load that first hold with “north dakota crude,” only to experience the malfunction that has left her temporarily disabled upriver, its outer hull gashed open.

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Tomorrow I hit the road . . . gallivanting and visiting season.  I thank all of you for reading, many of you for helping me get these fotos, lots of you for correcting my errors and supplying missing info. Happy New Year and let’s pray for much-needed Peace on Earth . . . .

Of course, every day is water day in the sixth boro of the city of NY, and it’s great that MWA and other sponsors have chosen for five years now to recognize that fact . . . on a big “get out on the water” day . . . because who OWNS the port . . . ultimately WE do, you and I, as citizens of this country.  Many organizations manage it, enforce regulations in it, and fund educational activities about it . . . but WE own it, the port, the water . . .  and support it with our taxes and our votes.

Enjoy this set of twelve fotos taken over roughly a 12-hour period yesterday.   At daybreak, Pegasus and Urger were still rafted up on Pier 25.  This foto shows two boats whose combined longevity adds up to over 215 years!!

Resolute was northbound over by the Murchison-designed Hoboken terminal . . . which means a larger vessel needing assistance MAY shortly be headed for sea.  Here’s another Murchison-designed mass transit building in what today seems an unlikely location.

North River itself works tirelessly as part of the effort to keep sixth boro waters clean.

Urger poses in front the the Statue.  Lady Liberty was a mere 18-year-old when Urger (then C. J. Doornbos) first splashed into the waters of a Lake Michigan bay.

Launch 5 races downriver.

Indy 7 shuttles folk around as Soummam 937,  the first Algerian warship ever to visit the sixth boro leaves for sea.

Little Lady II and a sailboat negotiate passage.

Laura K and Margaret Moran escort in container vessel Arsos (check its recent itinerary at the bottom of that linked page) and weave their way to the Red Hook container port through a gauntlet of smaller vessels, including Manhattan.

Catherine C. Miller moves a small equipment barge back to base.

Fire Fighter II hurries north on the Buttermilk Channel to respond to an alarm.

A flotilla (or bobbering or paddling or badelynge) of kayaks crosses the Buttermilk.

Pioneer tacks toward the north tip of Governors Island, leaving Castle William to starboard.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp on Bastille-sur-l’eau Day.

Related:  I was overjoyed to read the NYTimes this morning and find this article about a vessel calling at Port Newark!!  Bravo.  Back a little over a week ago I was miffed about this article . . . about the port in Trondheim, which could just as well have been written about skilled workers anywhere in the sixth boro.

Also, I’m passing along a request from the Urger crew:  if anyone sees a foto of Urger crew in any local print publications, please tell me so that I can look for a clipping to pass along to them.  Thanks much . . . .

Unrelated:  From today’s NYTimes Book Review section, an essay by Douglas Brinkley and Johnny Depp on Woodie Guthrie, who would have turned 100 yesterday.

By the way, from Mitch’s Newtown Pentacle, can anyone identify the tug in this post?  I can’t .

Once these were wooden barges, which

were towed around the harbor with a wide range of cargoes.  In the foreground … disintegrating … is one a tug that once could have done the towing, now unidentifiable and impotent.

The sixth boro has many such tugs and barges, although given the efficient advance of decrepitude, fewer each season.

Once there was even a sixth boro barge called Periwinkle, no doubt painted in that color, a popular nightspot.

Here’s another barge called Driftwood, whose paint scheme and additional storage transformed a coffee (or whatever else commodity)  transporter into an off-off-Broadway-even-off-the-island entertainment palace.  Only stories remain and can be told by David Sharps, who

created the Waterfront Museum out of a wooden barge he literally dug and pumped out of the Hudson River mud, saving it from the fate of those barges above.    The two fotos above come courtesy of David Sharps.   Now the barge, the 1914 Lehigh Valley 79 tours with 1907 tug Pegasus, and other

vessels like the 1901 Urger, featured in many posts on this blog, help us visualize what those ruins in the top fotos once looked like and serve as places of entertainment even today.   Here’s one set of fotos of Urger high, dry, but cold.

Anyhow, with five minutes of your time, you can help  LV-79 and Pegasus collect a $250,000 grant for ongoing repairs.  Just click here–AND each day until May 21 on the icon upper left side of this blog to vote.  Partners in Preservation has chosen to award $$ by grant applicants demonstrated ability to use social media.  So please vote . . . and ask a handful of your friends to do so as well . . . .

Unless otherwise attributed, all fotos by Will Van Dorp.

I first used this title a bit over two years ago in relation to two museum vessels whose status is currently challenged.  Click here for a new blog dedicated to saving the fleet languishing at South Street Seaport;  May Day’s not been transmitted there yet.

High and dry,

per plan . . . and  a future versus

one arrived here by accident and now like a fish out of water.

Urger gets floated this year with a new captain.  Type Urger in the search window to see the dozen or so stories I’ve done on her, of which my favorite is probably this.

Can anyone speak from fact about a future for Le Papillon?

Urger has to be the most beautiful 110 year-old I know!

All fotos were taken last weekend . . .  Fotos of Le Papillon by Capt. Justin Zizes, Jr. and Urger  by Will Van Dorp . .  up in Lyons, NY.

Unrelated:  Another fantastic video of Rotterdam harbor by Fred Vloo.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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More Photos

Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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