You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Seneca’ tag.

This post, beginning in the hamlet of Jacksonburg NY,  overlaps a portion of the canal represented in yesterday’s post.  Notice our vessel to the left below;  the cattails beside the road to the road are growing in the original canal bed from 1825.

Our tender ferries folks back from shore excursions.

I believe this is tug Lockport in Herkimer.

Gradall #2 and tug Governor Roosevelt conduct dredging at Illion marina.

 

Tug Seneca undergoes shore work at Lysander.

Juice is generated in Fulton.

 

And as we approach Oswego, a sentinel watches our progress.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who needed to reduce file size to enable this post to load.

 

It seats one to power nothing, but makes a good puzzle here in the PowWow River some years ago.  In dry season, you walked through the gate and sat here to fish or just sit.

Poseidon’s Sea-Bee Pusher power unit has

has no seat, so you make your own with your own, complete with a foot rest.

You notice you can’t drive Urger from a seat; but there is a seat

for the engineer of this bell boat.

If we assumed the engineer’s seat, this handle would be our major control over this 19-ton Atlas-Imperial.   You can see the seat on this youtube clip of the engine running.

Since we’re on the Erie Canal, check out the wheel and controls of Seneca, which is also steered by standing crew.

I know I know . . . this is hard to read, but tug Seneca (1930) had a career with the USN in Boston and Brooklyn before it was purchased for work in the Erie Canal, in 1960.  GE?  yes, it’s diesel electric.

I’ve got lots of helm seats (or lack thereof) from Bart Hakse aka Zee Bart, who delivers vessels around the world with Redwise.  He took the photos below on a naval vessel.  Nation?  Zee Bart also finds time to do a blog called Uglyships.

 

The seatless helm above is from an unidentified vessel of the Vietnamese Navy.  Clearly it’s not a MetalShark.

Below, it’s the helm seats of  MF Hornelen.  

Note the flag on the left shoulder of the jacket.

And another from Zee Bart, FV Alpha.

 

I have many more helm seat photos from Zee Bart, but I’d love to have others to dilute Bart’s.

All the first photos here by Will Van Dorp; the others, thanks to Bart.

This is probably the last of this series as well.  These photos were all taken between October 2 and 19 in an area of the western canal, the extreme western portion of which is now more than a little snow-covered.  I don’t know much about this little 1985 one-off (I was told) fiberglass tugboat named Tilly.  Not the Tilly that’s currently underwater.  

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Mandalay . . . said to have down east fishing origins from the first decades of the 20th century . . . is a stunner.  Reminds me of Grayling, third photo down here.   Mandalay is on the Genesee river, not technically the canal, although their waters commingle.

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Capt. Green . . . another Genesee River denizen said to be a converted landing craft.

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Any word(s) on this?

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Truly a unique craft of western NY, cobblestone architecture–its height came during the first few decades after the completion of the Erie  Canal)  is celebrated in this museum just north of the canal in Childs, NY.

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Heidi, a 37′ 1941 Richardson, is truly a gem on the western canal.

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And this looks like almost too much fun!

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This brown “sculpture” made no sense to me when I first saw it, but then at a farmer’s market in Lockport, I notice a reference to “farm to pint” and local hops sales and tasted a range of local craft beers . . . of course . . . it’s a huge representation of a hops cone.

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Hobbit house?  dungeon?

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Try . .  outlet for a 19th century water power system in Lockport.

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And for a feat quite unimaginable to DeWitt Clinton and his cronies, here’s the Red Bull take.  Click on the photo below.

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Finally . . . I know I’ve posted a version of this photo previously, but this culvert under the canal begs a tip of the hat to that craftwork of an earlier era.

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I was truly fortunate to see this variety of craft, but for a time traveler’s view, you must read Michele A. McFee’s A Long Haul:  The Story of the New York State Canal.  One of my favorite sets of photos from the New York State Archives and featured in her book relates to Henry Ford . . . his 1922 vacation on the canal and subsequent decision to ship auto parts on the canal.  In fact, on p. 193 there’s a photo of new automobiles shipped across the state NOT by truck or train but by barge!

 

 

Here’s a view from the oldest of the fleet–Urger–heading through the Montezuma Wildlife Refuge.

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Grand Erie and Tender 4 (?) heading west almost three weeks ago.

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SPS 54 (?) tied up above lock 1 of the Cayuga-Seneca Canal.   By the way . . . SPS expands to “self-propelled scow.”

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Earlier this week, Urger meets Grand Erie near Clyde.

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Seneca in Lyons.   It was built by Electric Boat in 1932, and in 1960, was sold from the USN to Canal Corp.

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Another SPS,

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a derrick boat and a tender.

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Syracuse, a heavily loaded scow, and a derrick boat.

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And finally . . . can you tell by the foliage color?  Urger and buoy boat 109 with external fuel tanks in late August.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who recently with one erroneous click, lost about 200 photos.  Ouch and we move on.

 

Boston Navy Yard, February 1932 and launch day.  Click here to see the context.

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Grand River at Grand Haven, February 1907.

H J Dornbos
82 years later, the same vessel as the top one and now known as Seneca, pushes Tender #10 eastbound just east of Oneida Lake.

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107 years later than the second photo above, H. J. Dornbos, now known as Urger awaits dry-docking between Locks 2 and 3 in Waterford last week.  For a sense of how Urger looks high and defy, click here.

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Enjoy these additional shots from Seneca‘s wheelhouse.

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Here’s the story, and

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here’s what the 1960ish waterways of New York State looked like.

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Click here for an article on an international set of passengers Seneca has recently carried;  ditto here for an fall 2013 article an Seneca.

Thanks to William Lafferty for the 1907 Dornbos image.

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In order . .  . .  Governor Roosevelt with Tender#4,  Tender #4 with electric motor and unique stack, Urger, Seneca and Tender Dana on the nose, Tender Dana, “newish” antiques on Lake Oneida east end, dredge and Tender #10, Tender T-7, Governor Cleveland, Dragon dredge, derrick boat.  As to the tenders, think . .  a vessel for tending dredges and other vessels.  For Dragon dredge, I’ve no idea about the story there.

Read the rest of this entry »

Quick and dirty . . . since forces are pulling me every which way these days.  Between the Great Lakes, which Joe is warning me about, and the sixth boro, which I call home, is the Erie Canal.  And some classy vessels populate it, like Governor Roosevelt.   See my latest foto here.  Thanks to Jason LaDue for this shot of a very substantial ice-breaking hull.

Lockport here assists Day Peckinpaugh.  I hope to get to Lockport in spring.

More recently, Seneca was on the hard in Lyons.  So . . . was she the one built in 1932?

Thanks to Jason for the fotos attributed to him.  Here’s a foto of sister Canal Corp  vessel Urger in the drydock last spring.

{First, an “ad” for the opera on Mary Whalen.} Great mood foto and  ticket info here.

Now . . . Defender to Cigarette . . . prey to predator; cheetah to zebra. And the outcome…
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Cheetah! Busted! Hove to.

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Erie Canal tug Seneca, a government boat, attends to various and sundry canal work, here accompanying a crane barge clearing tree encroachment on a boat landing.

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Below is Marine 1’s John D. McKean. See this link for John D‘s welcome of the QM2 on her first arrival here. John D. may have only a few years of service left; scroll down to “changing tide” for 2009 replacement plans. More FDNY boats here.

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The newly refurbished 110′ cutter Tybee based in Woods Hole cruised westbound this summer. Tybee is one of about 40 110′ sisters.

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Getting us back to predator and prey, conversion of these 110′ cutters to 123′ faster ones has not gone smoothly.

For fantastic video of Coast Guard rescue of tran-Pacific rowe Roz Savage, see this link from Sea Fever, long on my blogroll.

All images by Will Van Dorp.

By the way, new to the blogroll at left… World Ship Society with lots of New York links.

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