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So here was 1 and in it I said I would answer a question in a few days and now a few weeks have passed.  The question pertained to the device mounted on the stern of vessel

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Husky.  Congrats to Seth Tane, who guessed correctly.  Here’s what Xtian writes:  “It’s a plough.  In French we talk about “nivelage” [leveling], which means after dredging the bottom of the sea is like a field that has just passed a plow.  This tool cuts the bump to fill the gap.  It’s also used in the rivers where the “alluvium” or the mud stays in always same places because of the current and built like “bottom hill” there.  And it happens also in some harbour (like ferries’ harbour) as because the ferries always doing the same maneuver and raise the mud that still lay at the same place.

With the plough used at the right time, ebb tide for example, the mud is raised and leaves the harbour with tidal current.  In some places the plough is used to feed the hopper dredger –  when the dredger is too large, the plough is used to remove a “bottom hill” when they are close to the bank to give the mud at the place where the hopper dredge is working.   The plough is not only used with mud but also with sand or pebble.  Google with words : Dredge – Plough.

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About Husky, the day I took this picture she was working closely with the dredge Rijndelta at the entrance of Maasvlakte harbor.   I add a picture of her below.”
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More of Xtian’s photos follow, like this closeup of the captain of Smit Cheetah,

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Fairplay 24 and 21,

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Union 11 passing the Mammoet headquarters,

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Smit Schelde,

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SD Rebel,

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Multratug 31, 

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Osprey Fearless, 

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Pieter (?) towing Matador 2,

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and finally the recently completed Noordstroom.

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Many thanks to Xtian for these photos of another watershed.

Sometimes getting something together for this blog depends on something I read.  Like this morning, I saw this article in the NYTimes headlines. I read as much as I can, stuff I disagree with as well as the other.  Anyhow, the photo with that article led me to pick up this photo I took from the plane a week or so ago.  Recognize it?  I has suspicions, but had to check it out.  Answer follows.

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Here’s a closer up, which clinched it for me.

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Try a little more context beyond the airport?

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And completely unrelated . . . how is the photo below–Island A–different from

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say .  . Island B, below?

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And while you’re still puzzling though the answer to my second question, the one on differences, how about this as the location for the airplane photos.  They all three show different portions of the Conch Republic.

The which Republic?

This Conch Republic;  scroll through here and see the flag.  The main feature in photos 1 and 2 is the airport on Boca Chica Key.  But that secondary feature there . . . submarine pits!!  Or canals for navy housing?

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Here’s identification for the third airplane photo . . . Saddlebunch Keys all the way to the west end of the Seven Mile Bridge.

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Now for the question about differences between the two islands . . .  the lower photo is granite/granite-gneiss bedrock protruding above the water of the St. Lawrence River.  The upper island is the creation of Richart Sowa.  It floats on 250,000 plastic bottles. Yes, it floats!  Here and here are sites devoted to Sowa’s creation.

Do you remember the sixth boro’s summer of the floating island?  And the summer of the water pod?  And the water dome?

What new islands with surprising features lie in the future?  Get a window seat on your new flight and enjoy the view.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

Let me pick up here, a closer up of the mystery tug Alnair from yesterday’s post.  I have no further info, but one reader–Thanks, L–wrote to suggest that Alnair looks like a YTB.  I’d thought so, too, but in Cuba?

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So consider this one, not my photo, but if you click on the photo and do a search for YTB, you’ll find that until May 2006, this “Cuban” tug was known as Apalachicola YTB 767.  So could Alnair be Chesaning YTB 769, for example?

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Al Mendares looks to be a small tanker named for the river that flows through Havana.

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And here from the seawall  . . . MSC Opera, which as of this writing is across the Yucatan Strait in Mexico.

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The red vessel is Vega, a trailing suction hopper dredger.

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And finally, this ungainly vessel is a ferry.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

For more on YTBs, click here.

 

I’m back and–before catching up on my time off the internet–I need to pack the robots back into Cosmoline and close out some January 2016 dredging business . . . here’s my most recent Professional Mariner article.  And below are some additional photos of the research done in June 2015.

This is what 1100 + cubic meters of misplaced river bottom looks like after it’s sucked up and being transported to another location where scour demands it be added.

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And that red boat in the distance is the client, at least the

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verifier for the client.

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Once in the designated discharge site, hydraulic ram start to press the

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hulls apart, and

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all that bottom finds itself in gravity’s grip and

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tumbles out.

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Now only some water remains as the vessel–Ocean Traverse Nord–returns to the worksite and

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lowers the arm to suction up another 1100+ cubic meters

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of gallivanting silt piles, here shown in patches of green.  Notice the darker rectangle, representing the location of the dredger hull.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

For video, click here and start at 13:51.

Thanks again to Barrel for sending another dredge photo.  These photos send me looking for background.  So here is what I can figure.

0abdrgDavidson Sasebo JapanNov1951

Davison (records say Davidson, but I’ll go by what I see in the photo above) was built by Dravo in Wilmington DE in 1945.  She was dispatched to Korea in 1951 because of the extreme tides in Inchonaverage range is 29 and extreme range is 36 feet.

Again thanks, Barrel.

I remember the day I first saw McFarland, coming up the Delaware, the largest dredge I’d ever seen.  Barrel has recently sent along earlier generations–as I see it–of the big Mac.

Let’s start with Goethals, built in 1937.

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Then there was Markham, seen here just prior to launch, and

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here she traverses in icy waters.  Can dredge operations proceed with ice?

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Here she pumps out.  Markham was reefed off North Carolina in 1994.

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McFarland went into service in 1967.  Her operations are described here by the skipper.

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Here she’s at work on the Delaware River.  This method of discharging is called side casting.

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Here she’s preparing to discharge into the transfer barge.

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All these photos come via Barrel.

For more background on these federal dredges, click here.

 

 

Here’s Ocean Traverse Nord, 213′ loa and a trailing suction hopper dredge built in Quebec City in 2012.

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photo taken on St. Lawrence in June 2015

Here’s Manhattan, trailing suction hopper dredge built in Sparrows Point in 1904, hull #43.

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And this is Atlantic, hull #44, also from Sparrows Point.

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Finally, Dodge Island, loa 275′ and built in Slidell LA in 1980.

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photo taken off New Jersey in November 2015

Thanks to Barrel for the archival photos;  the two color photos by Will Van Dorp.

Related:  click here for lots of photos of vintage USACE dredge equipment.

 

Earlier this “classic boat” month I posted contemporary photos of Millie B, ex-Pilot, USACE.

The first two photos below and the last one come thanks to “Barrel.”  I can’t accurately characterize what each is;  I’ll leave that to you.

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The middle two photos below come compliments of William Lafferty, frequent commenter, here, who writes, “[This photo] shows it at work, escorting McAllister tugs moving the sections of a floating drydock on the C & D Canal in April 1966.  One can barely see her Smith sister, Convoy, aside the drydock on the left in the foreground.”  Anyone care to speculate whether the nearer McAllister tug is none other than John E. McAllister, now known as Pegasus?  Also, where were these dry docks headed?

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And, “[This] one shows it at Fort Mifflin in January 1996 while, obviously, still with the Corps.”

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Here Pilot awaits off the port side of Goethals, built in Quincy MA, and used from 1939 until 1982 and scrapped in 2002. The category here–sump rehandler–sent me on a chase for answers that ended here.  New Orleans–the sump rehandler–was also built as a dredge in Quincy in 1912 before conversion and use until deactivation in 1963 and eventual scrapping.

0aab3Pump out DB#41 New Orleans Goethals Tug Pilot

Finally, last photo is from Barrel, and shows Pilot Palmyra showing a crane barge through the C & D Canal.

0aab4Pilot & Palamra Towing Titan Crane Barge C&D Canal - Copy

Thanks to Barrel and William Lafferty for these photos.

Interested in self-unloading vessels as seen here on tugster?  Read Dr. Lafferty’s book.

Which leads me to a a digression at the end of this post:  Day Peckinpaugh once had an self-unloading system.  Does anyone know the design?  Are there photos of it intalled anywhere?  The photo below I took in the belly of D-P back in September 2009.

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This is a pair, but it’s a digression at the start.  The left side of the image here is the north side plate glass of the Millennium Hotel on Church Street.

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Here’s the same tower from over five miles farther south.  But the star here is the blue tug, Atlantic Salvor, which two and a half years ago delivered segments of that antenna atop the WTC.  I caught that trip, a return to the sixth boro from greater Montreal here.

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Catching Atlantic Salvor here yesterday was thrilling, because a few months back she did her “sixth boro farewell” and sailed to Jamaica for a job.

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Bowsprite and I were having an all-too-infrequent pique-nique when this unit arrived from that Jamaica job.

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And paired with Atlantic Salvor . . .  there’s the Witte 4001 and I think J. P. Boisseau, as well as

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Caitlin Ann, at least for the passage through the Kills.

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Welcome back, Salvor!

. . . I haven’t figured out what the shakers are yet.  But of course, people are the primary movers, even for movers of people like Martha’s Vineyard Express.

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There are silt movers like Stuyvesant.

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And of course all manner of movers of fluids to be respected like Loya and

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Red Hook and

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Orange Blossom.

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There are movers of boxes like Vega and

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Josephine K. Miller, who can do local moves for cargo boxed or bundled or . . .  other.

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There could be a category of movers of movers like this and

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direct movers and

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indirect ones.

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Maybe I should spend some time today trying to figure out who the shakers are.  All photos recently by Will Van Dorp, who was being given a tour of traffic in San Francisco Bay and noticed this interesting assemblage of names of movers.

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