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or I can call this Port of Albany 2, or better still Ports of Albany and Rensselaer.  Albany’s fireboat Marine 1 has been on this blog here.  Anyone know where it was built?

The port has not one but . . .

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but two large cranes.

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And bulk cargo is transferred through the port in both directions, whether it be solid or

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dusty.

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Over on the Rensselaer side, scrap seems to be a huge mover.

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North of Port Albany is USS Slater, about which lots of posts can be found here.  But it’s never occurred to me until now that the colors used by Slater camouflage and NYS Marine Highway are a very similar gray and blue!

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Kathleen Turecamo (1968) has been in this port–135 miles inland–for as long as I’ve been paying attention, which is only a little over a decade.

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This September, NYS Canal Corp’s Tender #3, which probably dates from the 1930s, traveled south to the ports of Albany and Rensselaer.

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The port is also a vital petroleum center, both inbound and out.

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With the container train traffic along the the Hudson and the Erie Canal, I’m only less surprised than otherwise that Albany-Rensselaer currently is not a container port.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s general info about the Port of Albany, although a lot of info there seems a bit out of date.  For a blog that visits visits the ports of Albany and Rensselaer more regularly, check here.   Here’s the port of Albany website.

And last but not least, check Mark Woody Woods’ broad sampling of ships heading to and from Albany-Rensselaer.

 

Here was the first in the series from late in August this year.  Of course this tug with its earlier, longer name has been here many times before.

The point of this post is to profile the mobility of the world afloat . . . people, cargoes, movers . . .  Here was Frances in Waterford early morning Saturday, September 12.  Note Lehigh Valley 79 down the way.

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The next two photos come thanks to Glenn Raymo, who lives and takes some great photos up by Poughkeepsie.  Late Monday afternoon–September 14– he caught not only Frances but also the hitchhiking barge Lehigh Valley 79 southbound, along with several scows of crushed stone.  I guess all barges hike hitches, technically.

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Here the “tow” passes Mariner’s on the Hudson, in Highland, NY, where Jeff Anzevino keeps his photo platform.

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The following morning I caught this photo of Frances over in front of Bayonne.  By now, Lehigh Valley 79 had been returned to its place over in Red Hook Brooklyn.

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From the Erie Canal, where some of the Frances crew may have taken part in the line toss,  to New York City’s sixth boro in a couple days .  . this is a water world.  And what makes it even more remarkable,

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a versatile tug like Frances could–if there was a compelling reason to do so, traverse the Erie Canal and head into the huge north coast area we call the Great Lakes Basin.

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Thanks to Glenn Raymo for the two photos above;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

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