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or I can call this Port of Albany 2, or better still Ports of Albany and Rensselaer.  Albany’s fireboat Marine 1 has been on this blog here.  Anyone know where it was built?

The port has not one but . . .

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but two large cranes.

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And bulk cargo is transferred through the port in both directions, whether it be solid or

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dusty.

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Over on the Rensselaer side, scrap seems to be a huge mover.

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North of Port Albany is USS Slater, about which lots of posts can be found here.  But it’s never occurred to me until now that the colors used by Slater camouflage and NYS Marine Highway are a very similar gray and blue!

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Kathleen Turecamo (1968) has been in this port–135 miles inland–for as long as I’ve been paying attention, which is only a little over a decade.

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This September, NYS Canal Corp’s Tender #3, which probably dates from the 1930s, traveled south to the ports of Albany and Rensselaer.

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The port is also a vital petroleum center, both inbound and out.

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With the container train traffic along the the Hudson and the Erie Canal, I’m only less surprised than otherwise that Albany-Rensselaer currently is not a container port.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s general info about the Port of Albany, although a lot of info there seems a bit out of date.  For a blog that visits visits the ports of Albany and Rensselaer more regularly, check here.   Here’s the port of Albany website.

And last but not least, check Mark Woody Woods’ broad sampling of ships heading to and from Albany-Rensselaer.

 

Bananas.  An accident?  One waiting to happen?

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Actually, besides being tasty and nutritious, they are a non-polluting lubricant to the rails.  All but the last photo here come from Jeff Anzevino, who captured  Thursday’s launch of the latest barge up at Feeney Shipyard on the Rondout up in Kingston.   Click here for some of Jeff’s photos used previously in this blog.

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After the launch, the new barge was towed to owners along the Hudson by Fred Johannsen.  Click here for previous photos of Fred Johannsen.

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I’m not sure who took this photo, which I took from Jeff’s FB stream, but it shows Jeff in the small green and white boat to the left taking the photo above.  The dramatic shot was taken from the Walkway over the Hudson.

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Here’s Fred Johannsen light.

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The photo below–taken from the Walkway– shows Ocean Tower delivering framework for the new TZ Bridge.

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And the same tugboat and cargo, here taken by Mark Woody Woods.

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Many thanks to Jeff and to Mark for use of their photos, which iId seen on FB, which I know some of you don’t do.

This photo was taken in late spring 2009.  Onrust had been splashed just a day or two before, as recorded in post 1 here and then 2 here.   But look over to the right side of the photo, the two bollards on squarish platforms in the water.

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These.  Well, at summer pool . . . when the water level of the canal is up to allow navigation, they look like so, but

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when winter comes and the state hydrologist directs draw-down of the pool, the bollards are on platforms that

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are actually concrete barges, ones that do NOT rise and fall with changing pool levels.  The snowy photos I took last weekend.

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Click here and here for some of the history of these century old barges.

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Note the reference numbers below and

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below.

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Here’s how they look on google satellite view.   For more on the builder behind these, click here . . . G. A. Tomlinson.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s a range of photos from the present to the unknowable past.  Gage Paul Thornton . . . 1944 equipment working well in adverse 2014 conditions.   Photo by Bjoern Kils of New York Media Boat.

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In 2007, McAllister Responder (1967) moved Peking (1911) across the sixth boro for hull inspection.  Photo by Elizabeth Wood.  That’s me standing on port side Peking adjacent to Responder house.

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1953 Hobo races in Greenport Harbor in 2007.

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A glazed over Gulf Dawn (1966)  inbound from sea passes BlueFin (2010).

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Deborah Quinn (1957) awaits in Oyster Bay in 2010.

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HP-Otter and HR-Beaver . . .  said to be in C-6 Lock in Fort Edward yesterday.  Photo by tug44 Fred.   New equipment chokes on ancient foe but no doubt will be dried off to run again.  Compare this photo with the fourth one here.

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Unidentified tug on Newburgh land’s edge back in 2009.  I’ve been told it’s no longer there.

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Unidentified wooden tug possibly succumbing to time in August  2011.

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Ditto.  Wish there was a connection with a past here.

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Thanks to Bjoern, Elizabeth, and Fred for their photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

If you’re going to the market event in Manhattan today, look for signs like this, painted what must be Ceres

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blue.  This is the west end of the Brooklyn Navy Yard, closest to Vinegar Hill.   Beyond the East River there, protruding into the sky to the right, that’s the empire State Building.   Ceres has arrived, and

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on schedule!

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Inside this warehouse, I picked up my order of Ricker Hill Orchards vinegar and Champlain Valley Apiaries  honey.

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Excuse the poor quality foto.  Could someone explain the dried (?) birds’ wings?

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There was seaweed . . .

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pumpkins,

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wild artichokes,   and much much more.

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Agger Fish–right next to the warehouse–was a sponsor of the Brooklyn event, as were Brooklyn Grange, triple island, and Marlow & Daughters.

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Morgan O’Kane played, parents shopped and talked, and and kids danced.

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If you’re local and  have time, get down to the New Amsterdam Market today . . . on the opposite side of the river here.

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Congratulations to Erik and the team for a very big accomplishment.  Although there’s lots of work left this season, season two starts up soon.   Here’s some preliminary info on the vessel, which was modified in the construction. In case you’re wondering . . . Erik’s estimate is that Ceres sailed only about twenty percent of the trip.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who alone is responsible for any errors in reporting.

Here, here, and here are my previous Ceres posts.   Last but not the least least . . . it’s bowsprite’s rendering.  Here’s the NYTimes version.


Is it a vestige of a past whoseOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

artifacts are mostly

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disappearing?  Or

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is it an enterprise of

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what is

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to come?

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Read how the Danes and Dutch already do it.  These Dutch from Tres Hombres wanted to sail into the sixth boro last year but were stymied by red tape.   Then there’s the Vermont working sailcraft project discussed here.  Andrew Wilner has more examples in his blog here.   Here’s a veritable bibliography of hybrid sail ideas.

Working Harbor Committee presents a panel discussion of this topic tonight from 6 pm — 9 pm in Manhattan.    Click here for details.

All fotos here by Will Van Dorp.  The disintegrating sailboat fotos were taken near Bear Mountain last weekend, and the Black Seal three-masted schooner fotos date from when it delivered 20 tons of cocoa beans to Red Hook in June 2011.   Here and here are related blog posts I did back then.

 

Click here for an ice post from two years and two months ago, featuring the very same tug–Kimberly Poling–with a slightly different paint job.  Know this bridge?

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Here’s a closer up shot of the tug/barge.   Our destination is the top of the cliff on the far side.  Know the name?

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Here’s looking north from below the bridge.  Freight travels on the west side of the Hudson, although this particular CSX train

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happened to be pulling this unit . . . CSX SWAT.  Click on the blue info link at the lower left of that link . . . it is what it sounds like.

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The east side of the river has AmTrak and commuter passenger lines and

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here a New York Naval Militia vessel.

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By the time we’re ready to start the serious climb, Kimberly is about ready to make the right turn around the base of Dunderberg Mountain.

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Here’s our destination, Anthony’s Nose, as seen with a long lens.

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And as seen from the top looking west and

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looking south.  By the time, we got up there, Kimberly was already beyond Croton Point.   Here’s a previous tugster post from Croton Point.  The land directly across the river from the base of the flagpole is Iona Island.

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and approaching Tappan Zee Bridge, not visible.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s a tugster post from 2.5 years ago showing the Bear Mountain Bridge–the bridge featured here and located about 40 miles north of the Battery— from underneath. . .  scroll through.  Climb Anthony’s Nose soon . . . before the leaves happen.

Here was the first “play boats.”

What’s this?

For some to entice us to play, it takes a 1935 85′ Mathis Trumpy named

—what else–

Enticer.  Exactly a year ago, I posted about a 1926 Trumpy Mathis named Freedom.

For others it takes teeth and arms . . . even if faux.   If you live along the Erie Canal, keep a watch since PT 728 will soon be moving over to Lake Erie.

And still others of us need to fish, as from a C-Dory like this.

Then there are Feadships like Utopia II.

Or there’s the plaything of Roman Abramovitch, the

vessel with the luxury tender, Luna!

What’s this red unit, plaything of tides, currents, and winds?  More later.

And very near many of these playboats, a banded bird that plays with prey. To see more eagles along the Hudson and other birds, click here.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Blue is the colour of the sky . . .”  in the Donovan song of almost a half century ago, but this isn’t a post about foliage, although I took this foto Friday . . . if you’re wondering why I didn’t post.  Guess the location?

Brown is the color of the Hudson, yesterday, as seen high above crane barge Columbia (and Sarah Ann??) viewed from Storm King, about 60 miles north of the sixth boro.

Brown flows under Margot and Benjamin Eliott at Waterford about a hundred miles north of Storm King.

It has been the color of the Hudson and feeders streams since the visitation of Irene (note the high point on the Second Street Bridge) and the rest of the rainy season in the Hudson and other Northeast watersheds.

But go another 70 or so miles north of Waterford, not far from the headwaters of the Hudson (as far north from the sixth boro as Washington DC is south!!) and the

waters through the rock

are clear, not cafe au “way too much” lait.

Twas a good place to get away and

reconnect.  Hiking here . . . offers no clue of what cliffs lie downstream.

I know I missed the arrival of tugs Justice and Reinauer Twins and who knows whatever else     . . . come through the boro, but gallivants can’t and shouldn’t be postponed.

Fotos by Will Van Dorp.   More Donovan?

And speaking of colors from inks and pigments as multi-hued as nature up north, check this out from my favorite niche-leaping, river-crossing, shipshifting cliff-dweller . . .  and so much more.

For explanations on all manner of color, checkin with seaandsky.

Last Friday I rubbed my eyes after seeing a “shadow” on a section of the KVK.  Results of dredging, I wondered?  An issue of oil?  Problems in my perception?  Some time later, I looked back and  the color differentiation of waters

had moved.  That recalled this scene  back in June . . . a v-shaped force that swung large ships, each in the same direction as it was engulfed.

And back to Friday, here’s how the water streaks evolved.  It must be fresh river waters . . .  with their silt load, I then concluded.  Click here for Vlad’s post commenting on the same phenomenon.  And Fred tug44 sent these fotos from Waterford . . .  And this pic (by Patrick Dodson) of khaki waters overwhelming Lock 8 in Rotterdam.

So I decided on a gallivant up to see where this water painting the sixth boro came from.  Note the Hudson Light in the distance left.  (Doubleclick enlarges.)  Here’s the marina in Hudson, NY, with mud

stains showing the ramp and half the parking lot had been inundated.

As was the case in Catskill Creek, given debris and docks askew there.

Along the Hudson, here’s a clue to water level along the waterfront in Athens.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.   Alas, clean-up and reconstruction will last longer than the silt coloration in the sixth boro.  Click here and here for some of the last fotos I took up in that stretch of the River, almost a year ago.

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