Here was the first in the series from late in August this year.  Of course this tug with its earlier, longer name has been here many times before.

The point of this post is to profile the mobility of the world afloat . . . people, cargoes, movers . . .  Here was Frances in Waterford early morning Saturday, September 12.  Note Lehigh Valley 79 down the way.

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The next two photos come thanks to Glenn Raymo, who lives and takes some great photos up by Poughkeepsie.  Late Monday afternoon–September 14– he caught not only Frances but also the hitchhiking barge Lehigh Valley 79 southbound, along with several scows of crushed stone.  I guess all barges hike hitches, technically.

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Here the “tow” passes Mariner’s on the Hudson, in Highland, NY, where Jeff Anzevino keeps his photo platform.

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The following morning I caught this photo of Frances over in front of Bayonne.  By now, Lehigh Valley 79 had been returned to its place over in Red Hook Brooklyn.

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From the Erie Canal, where some of the Frances crew may have taken part in the line toss,  to New York City’s sixth boro in a couple days .  . this is a water world.  And what makes it even more remarkable,

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a versatile tug like Frances could–if there was a compelling reason to do so, traverse the Erie Canal and head into the huge north coast area we call the Great Lakes Basin.

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Thanks to Glenn Raymo for the two photos above;  all others by Will Van Dorp.