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Thomas A. Feeney tows an unidentified barge, which appears to be wood.

A closeup of the same photo shows the tug is clearly Thomas A. Feeney, the founder of the shipyard that built wooden barges.  Any idea where  Thomas A. Feeney may have been built?  Her fate?  Openings can be seen at the top of the wheelhouse as well.

K. Whittelsey, was built in 1930, scrapped in 2008, and of course there were a lot of stories found in legal decisions–and photos— in between.

Here she transits westbound at lock E-8.  She spent some of her working years as a OTCo boat, a sad few years sunk in Gowanus Canal.

Tug Seneca pushing tank barge Atlantic.  Any ideas on which Seneca this was?  Note the “Observe Safe Boating Week”  banner and the laundry hanging below along the port side.  The gentleman standing on the gate almost appears to be holding a cell phone to his left ear.

This would be the 1907 Eileen McAllister.

Morania No. 9 was built at Matton Shipyard in 1951

 and christened Edward Matton.  Was that upper house removed?

 

I’m left to wonder about the conversation between the formally dressed man-in-black on shore and crewm,an on the boat.  But more important, if this is also No. 9, what happened to then portholes in the wheelhouse?

In 2000, she was reefed off Manasquan River as Patrick J. McHugh as part of the Axel Carlson Artificial Reef.

As I stated yesterday, I have hundreds of these images for not only tugboats but also canal motor ships. Besides these, I’m told the Canal Society has thousands more negatives in storage, yet to be scanned or even inventoried. 

I’m posting these in small batches to elicit what memories and associations are out there.   Although I also post on Facebook to widen the cast, please comment here rather than on FB so that your comments remain with the post, not lost in the FB feed and flow.

As a way to begin working through the cache, I have jumped into this without a thorough plan;  more Conners and Blue Line and Feeney images will follow.  Using the tags, you can link to what’s been done in the past by clicking on a given tag [but maybe you already know that.]

 

I’ve been entrusted with copies of photos from the Canal Society of New York taken by Albert Gayer.  Gayer collected photographic glass negatives and old postcards showing canal-related scenes as you can spend the whole day looking at here.  My favorites include this 1902 bicyclist in Rexford and this 1897 (?) hard hat diver about to descend into Buffalo harbor on a ladder, much as would be done in such a project today.

He also took photos of tugboats and other commercial vessels operating in the what was the Barge Canal, in the 1950s.  If I’m wrong about that or any of this, I expect to be corrected.

For some of these, I’ve been able to locate information.  For example, details on Hustler 

can be found at the ever-valuable Tugboatinformation.com   One unique feature–at least to my 21st century eyes–is her version of an “upper wheelhouse,” which I suspect could be retracted as needed to lower her air draft.   It is my hope that readers can group-source much more about the three boats in today’s post.  

For example, in the photo below, the Oil Transfer Company (Otco) logo is still in the stack.  Otco was acquired by Moran in 1950, yet just beyond the tug is an automobile that looks to be at oldest a 1952 Mercury wagon.  So why is the Otco logo still on the stack?

Next up, it’s clearly Anna L. Conners, a Conners Marine tug, that seems to be undergoing some paint maintenance.  

Here she’s clearly westbound at the top of Lock E-17 in Little Falls.  Anna L. Conners (or Connors) was built at Jakobson in Oyster Bay in 1942 for Standard Towing.  What become of her in the 1990s when she dropped out of documentation as Mid State 1?  Other than lawsuits, I find nothing about Conners Marine.  I’ve found reference in case law to a Conners Marine tug Maple Leaf.  Which other Barge Canal tugboats did Conners operate?  Of course, there’s the still-extant 1881 Elise Ann Conners.

Sagamore was a fairly common name for vessels in parts of the 19th and 20th centuries, and oddly enough, a small (1730 teu) US-flagged container ship, Delaware ported, is currently sailing off Oman.

This Sagamore was part of the James McWilliams Blue Line fleet, a family business that appears to have started in the late 19th century by James’ father, Owen J. McWilliams.  The 1957 Spartan,  also in that fleet, was reefed in 1986 at Sea Girt;  fewer than 30 years in service seems a short life for a boat.  

 Sagamore has more port lights than I’ve even seen in a tugboat. What became of Sachem and Bristol, referred to and depicted in the first link in this paragraph?

I have many more of these Barge Canal tugboat photos from the Gayer collection.  I hope you enjoy filling in more pieces of the history of these vessels.

For more on the Canal Society of New York, click here, or check them out on Facebook here

Parts B, C, etc. can be forthcoming.

 

Below is a variation on the photos I posted yesterday, showing a bit more context to the west.  Let’s recap identifying right to left:  Regulus, Teresa with Acadia, and GLDD tugboat Douglas B. Mackie and dredge barge Ellis Island.  

I’ve posted other GLDD dredges in the past:   Padre Island here, Terrapin Island here, Dodge Island hereGLDD trailing suction head dredges have “Island” in the name, but they are only some of GLDD’s dredging machines.

Mackie is huge:  158′ x 52′ x 27.3′ draft, and powered by two Mak 12M32C-T3, 7,831HP each, turning controllable pitch propellers. The dredge barge has its own power for the pumps.  See some stats here, and more  stats here.

Note the black hull of Mackie and the red of Ellis Island

Ellis Island measures 433′ x ’92, can dredge down to 122′ and has hopper capacity of just shy of 15,000 yd3.  Dredge spoils can discharged through the bottom of the hull over a designated dump site.

She’s been working off Sandy Hook. I believe this is the only ATB trailing suction hopper dredge in the US.

All photos, WVD, who supposes she came in for protection from rough seas;  as of this morning, she headed back out to the work area.

 

This follows such “something different” posts as Whatzit 41 and 39, Something Different 48 and Irene Aftermath 1 and 2.  If you’re not familiar with the color coding, blue is for passenger vessels, pink is personal vessels, and aqua is tugboats.  A circle means anchored or moored and an arrow means underway.   These two groups of five then are passenger vessels, image copies last night about 1800.

In fact, from l to r and if one atop the other, top to bottom, they are Veendam, Zuiderdam, Nieuw Amsterdam, and Volendam.  The other cluster is Anthem of the Seas, Mariner of the Seas, Celebrity Reflection, Celebrity Edge, and Nieuw Statendam.

Green is for cargo ships and red is tankers.  The moving blue symbols (l to r) are Independence of the Seas,  Harmony of the Seas, and Oasis of the Seas.  The blue circles are (l to r) Symphony of the Seas, Emerald Princess, Crown Princess, Island Princess, and Regal Princess.

To add some drama to the top two images, let’s tally up the potential number of passengers on these vessels.  Since I don’t know what the status of passengers on the vessels in the top two photos is, I’ll just give maximum capacity totals, passengers plus crew.  Want to estimate?  How many crew in the case these vessels have no paying passengers?  Answer follows below., but please guess?

Adding to the strange clusters, how about destination given as “nowhere” or

“adrift”.  There are some metaphors here . . .  like this and this.

 

My totals . . .  for the enumerated vessels in the top two photos . . .  at capacity paying passengers . . .  86,535.  And if all those vessels are crew only, there are still 22,331 onboard, folks not earning tips.  If you’ve been on a cruise, which I have not, you can guess the general range of nationalities of these crew and what they do with their money.

As of this morning, the clusters are shuffling.

 

I didn’t plan it, but this past week, I’ve seen a lot of Dann Marine boats, so that’s why this post.

Running against a NW wind, Pearl Coast handles some spray quite handily as she tows Cement Transporter 1801. She’s a big boat:  127′ x 40′ with 5600 hp.  Click here for previous appearances of her on this blog.

Into that same wind, here’s Ivory Coast heading light along the Delaware shore.  Click here for previous posts with Ivory Coast.

 

I believe this is my first time to add East Coast to this blog, although she’s been in the Dann Marine fleet for several decades.

Welcome then.  She’s on the Sugar Express run between Florida and Yonkers. See previous Sugar Express posts here.

And another Dann Marine boat I suspect I’ve not seen before . . . Sun Coast,

inbound at the Narrows.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

This post follows on one I did seven and a half years ago, here.

The first photo--Donna J. with B. No. 272— comes thanks to Jed, whose Caribbean tugs you may recently have seen here.   Donna J. is moved by two EMD R20-710G7C-T3 generating 10,000 hp.  Also notable is her fuel capacity of 301,504 gallons of fuel, which if I used the right formula, converts to 1055 metric tons of diesel.

Here are more recent Bouchard units photos starting with Jane A. with B. No. 225 on the North River,

Evening Star passing IMTT Bayonne,

Boys crossing the southern tip of Newark Bay,

Buster with B. No. 255, 

Ellen with B. No. 280 in the same anchorage same day,

Buster and Evening Mist . . . and how about the one to the left?  Guesses?

It’s Doris Moran last week.

Thanks to Jed for the photo of Donna J;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Georgetown is South Carolina’s second largest port.  More on that in a moment, but for now, here’s an intriguing photo from the South Carolina Maritime Museum in town.  Where in New York was this steam houseboat built, I wonder.  In the Santee Gun Club notes, it reports that it took four months to deliver Happy Days from NY to Santee.  And, are they standing on ice here?

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Here’s what I saw of commercial vessels in port.  In the background is

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the now-shuttered ArcelorMittal steel plant.  Beyond the steel plant is International Paper mill, clearly quite busy. The mill grew out of the Atlantic Coast Lumber Company.

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I mentioned the maritime museum:  it’s worth a stop.  Also, check out the Gullah Museum.

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This intriguing artifact is outside, with the story

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here and below.   What’s misleading about the photo below is that the propeller is from the Norwegian freighter Eriksson, which at 285′ was smaller than the whaleback Everett, 346′.

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From Auke Visser, here are many more photos of City of Everett.

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One thing I found surprising about the history of Georgetown is its connections with Maine shipbuilders.

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You can guess how this encounter between the 168′ 506 ton four-master and the 403′ 6026 ton steamer turned out.  Read about the findings of the court in reference to the collision here. Click here for more info on SS Prinz Oskar, which became Orion after the US seized it.

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Will Van Dorp, who’s heading back to Georgetown in the spring, took the photos here both inside the museum and along the boardwalk.

*** Click here for the archive of the “early history of the Santee Club


		

Ellen McAllister first appeared on this blog almost 10 years ago here.  At the time I knew nothing about an entire category of navy tugs repurposed for civilian life.  Here were the two previous posts in this series.

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For a vessel that turns a half century this spring, to my outsider eyes, she’s as good as ever.

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Here she delivers the docking pilot

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before serving as escort to the dock.  By the way, while ROROs like Boheme are underway, is there a panel the seals off this area?

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Here are a few photos of her in Lake Michigan, off Scotland, and then as a single-engine McAllister tug.  I’d love to see more….

Anyone identify the YTB below?  There’s a spoiler if you scroll past, so guess before proceeding.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

taken by Will Van Dorp  January 1, 2012

It’s YTB-786, which did its Navy service in Rota Spain,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

and is now based as Margaret McAllister in Wilmington NC.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All photos by Will Van  Dorp.

So the difference that makes the “really” is that several folks have contributed these photos.

Starting in Toronto with Jan van der Doe, here’s M. R. Kane, which has appeared here and here previously on this blog.  In the first link, you’ll see Kane towing the hull that would become tall ship Oliver Hazard Perry.

rrt1

Next three photos came from Allan Seymour, who took them as he traversed the Cape Cod Canal recently.  This Independence is rated at 5400 hp.

rrt2

Bohemia and barge wait to pass.

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And Buckley McAllister shares escort work on the Canal with Independence.

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The rest of these photos I’ve caught recently, all of tugs I’d not previously seen.  Miss Ila came through the sixth boro Saturday,

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Miss Lizzy I saw Friday, and

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Performance I saw in Massena earlier this month, and

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Robinson Bay.  These last two are operated by DOT’s Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation (SLSDC), which is looking to replace these aging tugs.  Robinson Bay (103′ loa and built in Wisconsin in 1957) and Performance (50′ and Indiana, 1997) do maintenance work on the US portions of the Saint Lawrence Seaway.

rrt9

 

Thanks to Jan and Allan for the first photos here.  All the others are by Will Van Dorp.

Over the past few years, John Jedrlinic aka “Jed” has shared a lot of photos he’s taken near Norfolk, which is great since otherwise I’d never have seen some of these.  Take Huntington, below, apparently the in-house tug of the shipyard in Newport News.

photo date 19 APRIL 2010

photo date 19 APRIL 2010

Or McAllister Boys, I’ve no idea which foreign port she works out of today.

PHOTO DATE 19 april 2010

PHOTO DATE 19 april 2010

And Russel B. Murray.  Express Marine units used to be common in the sixth boro, but no more.

photo date 16 MARCH 2010

photo date 16 MARCH 2010

Russel B. Murray used to work in New York the year I was born  . . . then called Shamokin

photo date 16 MARCH 2010

photo date 16 MARCH 2010

I did see Night Hawk several times on the Elizabeth River in Fall 2015.

photo date 10 SEPT 2011

photo date 10 SEPT 2011

Chief is now Dann Marine’s Diamond Coast, but I’ve not yet seen her.

photo date 8 FEB 2011

photo date 8 FEB 2011

And finally, a former regular in the sixth boro, Lucinda Smith.  See her here in the KVK in 2011.

photo date 16 MARCH 2010

photo date 16 MARCH 2010

All photos here were taken by Jed.  Thanks.

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