You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Day Peckinpaugh’ tag.

And let’s start with the more . . . more photos and info on previous posts.    CCGS Samuel Risley appeared here.  She’s currently approaching the Soo.  What I didn’t know when I posted a photo of her on Lake Ontario is that she was returning from her first trip to Greenland (!!), where she was providing icebreaking support for a supply mission to Qaanaaq aka Thule.

Madison R–and I’ll do a whole post about her soon–now calls Detroit her base, I’m told.

Summer fog veils a Canadian cat and an Erie Canal buoy boat above E11.

How many folks pass by Day Peckinpaugh each summer and have no clue what she is (ILI 101… launched in May 1921!!), how long her work history  (1921–1995) has been, how wide a range of waters  (Duluth to Havana, I’m told) she covered, where her sister  (ILI 105) languishes . . . . .

She gets attention.

Here’s the blue-and-gold yard above E3!!

Yup that’s Urger among them.  And yes, the pause button on scuttling has been activated.

In the legends of Ford, a sign once marked this power plant adjacent to the Federal Lock in Troy as a Ford facility.   Could this have become the location of Ford’s imagined electric car plant?

And this brings us to Troy, these walls where construction workers have staged their equipment.

Scaffold, ladders, floats, and Jackcyn

 

 

and Lisa Ann.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s been working his way back to the sixth boro from the heartland.

If you’re local and would like to learn more about the New York State Canals, consider joining the Canal Society and coming to their fall conference . . .  on Staten Island.  I’ll be involved in two events . . .

 

This is day 3, the Rondout brought a surprising visitor in the form of

Kalmar Nyckel.  When I’m back, I’ll do a whole post of this vessel.

These photos are included chronologically, so you’d be correct to conclude that north of the Rondout there are signs of nature.   Foreign mariners especially must be surprised by all these critters.

 

The port of Coeymans always has activity, briefly docked here are Mister Jim

and James Turecamo.

Betty D is southbound just below the Federal Lock at Troy.

x

Once in the Canal, we are treated to many boats, including Governor Cleveland, 

BB 109, 

and Day Peckinpaugh.  Farther west, we pass the

Mohawk Harbor, the former Alco plant, dominated by the cube that is Walthousen reactor. 

and a self-propelled scow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

As we progress toward winter as well, the daylight hours shorten, making less to photograph, but I was happy we passed lock E8 in daylight to capture the crane GE uses to transship large cargos, like the rotor of a few weeks ago.

dscf9366

The changing leaves complement the colors of the vintage floating plant,

dscf9388

locks,

dscf9398

and even Thruway vessels.

dscf9411

Venerable Frances is a tug for all seasons as is

dscf9416

the Eriemax freighter built in Duluth,

dscf9421

both based near the city of the original Uncle Sam, which splashes its wall

dscf9432

 

dscf9434

with additional color and info.

dscf9443

Once this Eriemax passenger vessel raises its pilot house, we’ll continue our way to the sixth boro.

dscf9452

Will Van Dorp took all these photos in about a 12 hour period.

Earlier this “classic boat” month I posted contemporary photos of Millie B, ex-Pilot, USACE.

The first two photos below and the last one come thanks to “Barrel.”  I can’t accurately characterize what each is;  I’ll leave that to you.

0aab1tug pilot specs

 

0aab2Tug Pilot

The middle two photos below come compliments of William Lafferty, frequent commenter, here, who writes, “[This photo] shows it at work, escorting McAllister tugs moving the sections of a floating drydock on the C & D Canal in April 1966.  One can barely see her Smith sister, Convoy, aside the drydock on the left in the foreground.”  Anyone care to speculate whether the nearer McAllister tug is none other than John E. McAllister, now known as Pegasus?  Also, where were these dry docks headed?

0awlPilot 1-2

And, “[This] one shows it at Fort Mifflin in January 1996 while, obviously, still with the Corps.”

0awl2Pilot 2

Here Pilot awaits off the port side of Goethals, built in Quincy MA, and used from 1939 until 1982 and scrapped in 2002. The category here–sump rehandler–sent me on a chase for answers that ended here.  New Orleans–the sump rehandler–was also built as a dredge in Quincy in 1912 before conversion and use until deactivation in 1963 and eventual scrapping.

0aab3Pump out DB#41 New Orleans Goethals Tug Pilot

Finally, last photo is from Barrel, and shows Pilot Palmyra showing a crane barge through the C & D Canal.

0aab4Pilot & Palamra Towing Titan Crane Barge C&D Canal - Copy

Thanks to Barrel and William Lafferty for these photos.

Interested in self-unloading vessels as seen here on tugster?  Read Dr. Lafferty’s book.

Which leads me to a a digression at the end of this post:  Day Peckinpaugh once had an self-unloading system.  Does anyone know the design?  Are there photos of it intalled anywhere?  The photo below I took in the belly of D-P back in September 2009.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Given the hold shots from Wavertree in yesterday’s post, can you guess the vessels?  Answers at the end of this post.

While under construction . . . looking aft.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

During dormancy and along the port side looking aft?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

During restoration and looking aft . . . .

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

During rejuvenation and looking forward . . . Sept. 2009.  The rest of the photos, starting with the one below, all show parts of the same vessel.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A closeup taken from the photo above.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Outside same vessel showing corner of a hatch cover.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Day-Peckinpaugh in the sixth boro in September 2009.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Day-Peckinpaugh between Locks 2 and 3 in Waterford in September 2014

0aaaadp

 

Day-Peckinpaugh is expected to be towed to Buffalo at some point in August 2015.   If you live within reach of the Erie Canal, you might want to get shots of her making a highly unusual transit.  Here’s more on the first (2005) phase of D-P’s second life.

Holds shown above were 1) Onrust, 2) SS United States, and 3) Wavertree.  Thanks to all who’ve helped arrange access.

Here’s another interior shot from last year.

And this is a self-indulgent set of photos.

This post is a serious whatzit, an attempt to find out more about a tugboat in the photo below.  I use the photo courtesy of the Erie Canal Museum in Syracuse.  If you have not been reading this blog very long, I spent five months last year working on a historic tug on the Erie Canal.  Type erie canal into the search window and you’ll find hundreds of photos from then.

The photo appears to be taken in Rochester, nicknamed the Flower City, although as a kid, I had thought it was the “flour” city.   I guess it’s both.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Anyone know more about this tugboat?

So I went to the Monroe County Library image search site here and used the search term “boat,” and found a lot of fascinating stuff–like excursion boats now derelict, steam ferries, a seized bootlegger boat, yachts from a century ago, docks, and canal barges.  To whet your appetite, I include a few here.  Go to the website to read captions on reverse.  I know nothing more about Lorraine or Cowles Towing Line, but the “barge” it’s towing is currently known as Day-Peckinpaugh, which will gain some attention later this summer.  Photo is said taken on June 13, 1921.

0aaaa1bargecanalfairport1921

Taken on November 22, 1921, this is steam barge Albany, which raises more questions.  Go to the MCLS site for the info on reverse of the print.

0aaaa23steambargealbany

The photo below is also said taken on November 22, 1921 by Albert R. Stone.    I’d like to know what the name of the darker tug alongside the starboard side of the end of this string of barges.  So maybe these are the grain barges that broke away?

0aaaaaa22bargecanal1921

Again, a Stone photo, date uncertain, showing tug Henry Koerber Jr.

0aaaa2koerber1920

One more Stone photo, said 1918 . . . tug  Laura Grace aground off Grand View Beach . . . Greece?

0aaaa3lauragrace1918aground

And all of this returns us to the mystery photo from the Erie Canal Museum . . . my guess is that it was taken by Albert R. Stone, but it was not included in the Monroe County local history photo database.  Anyone help?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

Many thanks to the Erie Canal Museum for passing this photo along.

If your appetite is really whetted, enjoy these unrelated old and new photos of Urger–ex-State of NY DPW tug–and Seneca, currently a NYS Canal tug but previously a US Navy tug.

Click here for an index of previous “whatzit” posts.

Here’s my last canal ruins post, this one focusing on vestiges of the corridor as a dynamic industrial hub.  Day Peckinpaugh, delivered as cargo ship Interwaterways 101 in May 1921 is certainly not in ruins, as her younger sister–by two months–

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Interwaterways 105 has been since 1976, here disintegrating in the Arthur Kill.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Below the photo shows the dock in Rome where Day Peckinpaugh used to offload cement.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The Mohawk banks in Amsterdam . . . once a major location for carpet and rug making . . . now hold silent factories.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Not having been up the bank here, I can’t say whether Fownes still makes gloves here.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

On the south side of the Oneida River, docks exist where no supply barges have called in many years.  Anyone help with info on when supplies last arrived in Clay via barge?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

. . . or here not far north of Onandaga Lake?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I don’t know the number of bridges for pedestrians, trains, or automobiles that cross the canal, but this one clearly remains as scrap and carries no traffic of any sort.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Which brings us back to the Duluth-built younger sister of Day Peckinpaugh, also depicted near the beginning of this post.  I’d always wondered about Duluth, thinking it an unlikely location for construction of vessels that came to work on the canal.  But maybe it isn’t.  President Wilson created the US Railroad Administration (USRA) in December 1917, federalizing the railroads of the US as well as the Erie Canal.  Wilson placed the USRA in the hands of his son-in-law W. G. McAdoo, who soon thereafter nationalized strategic inland waterways including the Erie Canal and placed them in the hands of a Duluth shipping executive G. A. Tomlinson.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

To reiterate what I said at the beginning, Day Peckinpaugh is not among the ruins along the canal although its future role is under study.  Meanwhile, neither is ship tourism along the canal dead, as evidenced by Grande Caribe approaching from Peckinpaugh‘s stern.  Click here for more pics of Grande Caribe.

0aaaarc20

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

0aaaaex20OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA0aaaaex160aaaaex15OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Whether you carry passengers like Grande Caribe or bulk like Day Peckinpaugh, restrictions of size are the same.

Photos today by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s a collage of images as my last roundup 2013 post:

a half dozen working tugboats and a covered barge as seen looking east from the Second Street Bridge,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAa float plane that might have imagined this to be a different type of gathering,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

a swimmer in the water either doing a northern style Richard Halliburton re-enactment or setting out to do an underwater survey mission as the lock is –unbeknownst to her–about to open,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

(For more complete info on what’s going on here with the swimmer, check this post by bubbling-blowing bowsprite.)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

my possible future employer shoehorning an Eriemax passenger vessel into the first lock in the flight,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

waterdogs go fishing,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Onrust resplendant,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

a Dutch barge,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Urger dried out for some emergency surgery along

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

with Tappan Zee II,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Eighth Sea and Bill’s exercise machine,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Stu’s Dragonfly,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

the pilot’s understanding of the pushoff contest,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

and in Troy, some public art designed to assist memory . . .  the Soldier’s and Sailor’s Monument with goddess Columbia blowing her horn high above Troy, as seen from Tug44.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  See you in Waterford in 2014, I hope.

Late October 2011, Day Peckinpaugh and Frances Turecamo float above Lock 3, post-Irene, seen here through the eyes of the master of Tug44.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here’s Day Peckinpaugh last weekend, nose to nose with Urger, the latter here for shaft work.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

It’s unknown when if ever the DP will operate again.  Here and here are previous posts with the Eriemax bulk carrier.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Blount’s two decade old Grande Caribe applies the same design to contemporary passenger cruising.  Notice the popped-down house;  in this post from three years ago, the house is up. I’d love to hear from someone who’s sailed on one of these “small ship adventures.”  Shipboard romance?  What are the stopping off places for adventuring off the mother ship?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And compare the tug Frances Turecamo (1957) in the top foto to her incarnation now.  It’s great to see her back at work.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  Thanks to Jonathan Boulware , interim president of South Street Seaport  Museum, for passing along  this article and video of salvage of Astrid.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,256 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Recent Comments

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

December 2018
M T W T F S S
« Nov    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31