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June 2012 was pivotal for me.  A photo sent along by a friend alerted me to Canal commerce–Canadian corn– entering the US at Oswego, a place I knew something of from my youth. 

If that was a spark, then the breeze that fanned it was an invitation to do my trial article for Professional Mariner magazine, which led me to Kingston NY, the mouth of the Rondout, and a project involving use of a half century old tug Cornell to do TOAR signoffs.  My most recent article in the magazine came out today and can be seen here.

On that assignment, I was privileged to have a mentor, Brian Gauvin, do the photography.

Other big events for June 2012 included the movement of shuttle Enterprise from JFK airport ,

ultimately to the Intrepid Museum to be

hoisted onto the flight deck as part of the display, now covered.

My daughter went off to Brasil (again) and the Amazon, leading me to go there myself a year later, fearing she’d never return because she loved it so much there.

I’d given her a camera before she went, and was rewarded with some quite interesting photos, like these small motor boats that looked almost like slippers …

with straight shafts coming straight out of air-cooled engines.

During my trip up to the Rondout, I stopped in Newburgh, where replicas of La Niña and Pinta, crafted using traditional techniques on the Una River in Bahia, Brasil, attracted crowds, one of many stops along the great loop route. 

Other festivities on the Hudson that summer . . .

included the sails and music associated with the Clearwater Festival, and of course the small boats moving in some of the venues.

 

Patty Nolan and Augie were the small tugs, and of course the sailboats including Mystic Whaler, Woody Guthrie,

 

and of course the sloop Clearwater.  The Clearwater organization will not be doing a music festival in June 2022.  Mystic Whaler is now working in Oxnard CA at the Channel Islands Museum.

Summer time and the living is easy well, at least it feels that way some days . . . . 

All photos, except the first one, WVD.  That first photo was taken by Allan H. Seymour.

 

In fall 2010, deepening dredging was happening in the sixth boro to prepare for the ULCVs now so commonplace here,  after Panama Canal enlargement and Bayonne Bridge raising. These operations afforded me the chance to see a cutterhead close up.  The crewman wielding the hammer was trying to loosen a worn tooth.   By the way, those teeth weigh 35 pounds each.  Teeth . . .  dentist?

Then as now, Layla Renee was in the dredge support trade.  Right now she’s in Charleston.  She was only two years old at the time of the photo.

It looks that way, but W. O. Decker is NOT a dredge tender in this photo.  Here five people on Decker are catching the stare of the one dredge worker in work vest.

The entire K-Sea fleet has disappeared.  As of 2020, Falcon has become Carol and I’ve not yet seen her latest livery.  Houma was scrapped in 2017 in Baltimore.

Here are two of the McAllister tugs involved in easing MSC’s USNS Sisler (T-AKR 311)into Bayonne drydock as then-John P. Brown manages the door.  For many more photos of the event, check out “floating the door,” where you also see Allied’s Sea Raven, unlabelled.

I caught Growler at Mystic Seaport that fall.  Rumor has it that Growler has returned to the sixth boro under a new name and sans teeth, but is under wraps.

Also in Mystic at that time, 1885 steam/sail vessel Amazon (has nothing to do with Bezos), the 2000 Amistad, and the 1908 steamer Sabino.  Does anyone know the whereabouts of Amazon today?

My reason to be in Mystic that October was to work on Pegasus, seen here with Araminta and Cangarda.  What works of beauty all three are!

Deborah Quinn here is docked near where Jakobson Shipyard used to be located.  I believe that’s her location as of this writing.

Under the old Bayonne bridge, Maurania III assumes position to ease the 1997 Maersk Kokura around Bergen Point.  Maurania III is currently in Wilmington NC.

Back a decade ago, Day Peckinpaugh had some good paint on her, and Frances was like a cocoon in Turecamo livery.  There’s scuttlebutt of a new lease on life for Day Peckinpaugh.

Let’s end with dredging, as we began.  Terrapin Island was one of the regulars in the navigation dredging effort.  Terrapin Island is currently in Norfolk.

All photos, October 2010, by WVD.

Big announcement soon.

 

The Amazon is a huge treasure.  Whatever H G Buelow was loading this day, its current position is the Mediterranean, having departed Istanbul in the direction of the Suez.

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Mining and forestry send resources worldwide.  Zhong Xiang is northwest bound off Kuala Lumpur today.

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Sergi0 Buarque de Holandia is a new Brazil-built oil products tanker.   Although I know nothing about the tug, the rebocador, it led me to this video showing a method of making a tow.

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But as I go through my daughter’s fotos, I find myself more interested in the smaller local vessels, what occupies shallower waters.

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Let’s go all the way back to these.

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I’m curious what the white boxes here are used for.

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Small scale fuel stop, designed for a sector of commercial transportation mostly gone from US waters.

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The range is tremendous from one-passenger vessels and

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docks/playgrounds on the waterfront stilt buildings and

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very small versatile ferries to

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livestock carriers.

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This is waterfront/supra-water housing with water parks and

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markets.  What comes via small vessel from the “hinterwaters” includes lots of açaí and other products.

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I love the lines of these boats.

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Happy new year.  Thoughtful old year’s day today.  Peace!!

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAand health and smooth travels!

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Many thanks to my daughter for taking these fotos.

Here was 9 in this series, mostly taken by my daughter last summer near the mouth of the Amazon.  And since the holidays allow me to finally get the narrated version from her, I’m adding a set.  She took all of these in Brasil, most in the Amapá state, with a trip over to the Pará state.  .  Yes, bowsprite . . . there’s a meia here too.

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Note the river tugs Merlim and Excalibur, and the small boat moving in

0aaaaowto touch up hull paint.

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Passenger vessels come in all shapes.

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Passengers find a place where they can hang on, or

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not.

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Cargo transfers happen under way.

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Sleeping quarters are air conditioned.

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International commerce

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is nearby.

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Tug and barge transport is common.

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More soon.

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Thanks Myriam.  Maybe I’ll be your assistant next summer.

For more workboats from this area, click here.  For a tug aka rebocador on a Brazilian beach, click here.

Foto below was taken on July 3, 2012.  Charles D. McAllister . . . featured here dozens of times, was assisting British Harmony (see name on lifeboat) out of IMTT Bayonne . . . for sea.  Where?  Doubleclick enlarges fotos.

Related:  note the follow-though handwork demonstrated by the line thrower below.  Where is he?  He’s not throwing the line to anything belonging to British Harmony, but he is in the same watershed.

Ditto this tug and barge.  Where it it?  Notice the water color.  Notice the name on the barge.

MANAUS on the tug is the best clue.

All fotos in this post except the first one were taken by my daughter, Myriam, who’s on the Amazon all summer as a grad student.  I bought her a camera and said . . . “tugster needs you,” and she’s been following through since mid-May while I’ve focused mostly on my end of the sixth boro, not hers.  More on this later in this post.   That’s a sweet ride below.

She’s based in Macapa and took this and all the others from her workboat.  No, she doesn’t drive it.

Cargo moves by vessels like this, and

this.  Right now Ikan Suji is Shanghai bound with a hold filled with Amazonian raw materials, I’d bet.

My guess (and I’m often wrong) on this cargo is navigational aids in the making.

I wish she’d caught the rest of the ferry . . . but there are fewer possibilities for a bow than a stern.  I’d never imagine this house/stern arrangement.

NYC’s sixth boro  . . . as all areas . . . have their

government boats.

Behold two Amazonian “rebocadores ”  Excalibur and Merlin. Click here for Smit Rebras including some interesting newbuild fotos.  Thanks to Harold Tartell for suggesting looking here.

But, not unexpectedly, vessels on the Amazon and its many fingers are as diverse as the population of that great country.

This could be the Mississippi,

as could this.

From Macapa to Manaus upriver is 500 to 600 air miles.  Stadt Gera, in Macapa today, was in the sixth boro and on this blog  a year and a half ago.

And here’s why I put the foto of Charles D. McAllister and British Harmony first:  British Harmony is about halfway up the Amazon to Manaus as I write this.  One really can get anywhere watery from the sixth boro.    Knowing that and having concrete reminders like this are not the same.

From fishermen, people with cameras along the KVK, and Macy’s barge waiting for the 2012 Independence Day fireworks . . . to kids in wooden boats like this . . .  all seen by crew on British Harmony  on the same trip  . . . I find amazing.

I hope you enjoyed this glimpse of another watershed.   Myriam certainly has the gallivant gene.  Here’s some self-disclosure.  39 years ago  (!!) I traveled to my first professional job about 500 miles up the Congo River on a huge tugboat named Major Vangu, pushing four deck barges.  The tug had 8 or 10 “staterooms” and a bar/restaurant for paying first class passengers.   Second class were on a barge with shade, and third class slept among the cargo (barrels of fuel, trucks, crates of beer, misc .  .  .) on the other barges.  It took four days and nights to get from Kinshasa to Mbandaka, near where I spend the next two years.  The reason for the choice of a tug was the airplane was non-functioning and roads to get there would have taken weeks.   Making this realization today suggests the need for a long river trip next year. . . . hmmmm . . . .

This post is inspired by Jed’s extended resume of last April here, and a “lightbulb”  comment by Maureen.   Thanks to you both.

Related:  Several times I tried unsuccessfully to find good profile shots of Major Vangu, which sank in 1979.   Anyone have ideas on finding fotos of the old Onatra vessels like Major Vangu?

Related:  In writing this post, I stumbled onto this blog by an artist in Belem, a major Amazonian port.

Don’t forget to send in your estimate of the cost of ONE of these cutter head teeth.  Answer SOON!

J. P. Morgan’s Hoboken-built Corsair II sometimes flashes by from either an image or reference, but I never saw it:  it turned into scrap about 10 years before I was born.  I never expected to see anything like it.  I did know of Vajoliroja, Johnny Depp’s yacht.  And did post this foto (see 3rd foto from bottom)  of Atlantide, with some lines like  steam-yacht headed up the Hudson last fall.   So the following vessels quite astounded me in Mystic.  First, Cangarda.

My fotos do not do justice to

this ocean-spanning gem that currently

boasts seven steam engines!

If you can, get thee to Mystic soon to see this gem, “managed” by Steven Cobb, a former master of Wavertree and other vessels.

Currently, Mystic has TWO steam yachts aka screw schooner.  Amazon was dieselized

in 1937.

If I ever see either of these gems at sea, my first reaction will be to rub my eyes in disbelief, imagining them mirages . . . until I recall my most recent visit to Mystic.

Here are a few dozen fotos of Cangarda taken between 1901 and 1999.  Here’s a link to an article on the owner of Cangarda (scroll about halfway though).   Stuff can go awry at a ship launch, and that ALMOST what happened with Cangarda.   Cangarda joins a list of prestigious yachts saved through the efforts of folks at IYRS.

Here’s an article on Amazon, launched 1885!

Finally, just a potpourri of steam yacht images, of which one to see must be Gondola.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

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