You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘8th Sea’ tag.

Katanni and

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Sawyer I, these photos I took in September along the Saint Lawrence.

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I took the next photos in October.  Evans McKeil was built in Panama in 1936!   The cement barge she’s paired with–Metis— was built as a ship in 1956 and converted to a barge in 1991.

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Wilf Seymour was built in 1961 in Port Arthur TX.  I’ve always only seen her paired with Alouette Spirit.  Here she’s heading upbound into the Beauharnois Lock.   The digital readout (-0.5) indicates she’s using the Cavotec automated mooring system instead of lines and line handlers.

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Moving forward to Troy NY, I don’t think the name of this tug is D. A. Collins,   

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but I know these are Benjamin Elliot, Lucy H, and 8th Sea.

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Miss Gill waited alongside some scows at the booming port of Coeymans.

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And the big sibling Vane 5000 hp Chesapeake heads upriver with Doubleskin 509A.

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And one more autumnal shot with yellows, browns, grays, and various shades of red, and a busy Doris Moran and Adelaide.

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Will Van Dorp took all these photos.

 

The foto below is Nellie Crockett, a 1925-6 Tangier Island “buy boat” that may never have cleaved sixth boro waters, but–used with permission here from the FB page Chesapeake Bay Buy Boat–certainly conveys the notion of a workboat decorated for the end-o-year holidays.

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The rest of these fotos come courtesy of Justin Zizes, taken earlier this week in the Hudson off the west side of mid-town.   Circle Line does lights this way.  Here’s how you could get on board.

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Nearby, World Yacht does it this way.  And although you can’t get on for the end-o-year holiday, there are many other events.

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Notice anything interesting about this arrangement?  Look to the left side of the foto.

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It’s Sea Bear aka Sea Gus as the red-nosed draft animal.

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Here’s that same small tug without the Rudolphian accoutrements.

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Many thanks to Justin Zizes and to Chesapeake Bay Buy Boats for permission to use these fotos.

In the next week or so, if you take a foto of a workboat–or mariner– with colored lights a la Christmas, please send it to tugster.  I could possibly even come up with a gift for what we deem as the best foto.   By the way, I’m still mildly obsessed with finding a foto of the 1997 transport of the Rockefeller Center tree down the Hudson via tug Spuyten Duyvil and barge.

And what is the story of Sea Bear aka Sea Gus?  It looks to be cut of the same plans as 8th Sea.

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A truckable tug named Mame Faye and her tow anchor outside the current near the confluence of the Mohawk and Hudson Rivers.  Idyllic . . .  serene, sleepy upstate river banks .  . . eh?  She’ll be back.

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Here tugs Empire and Shenandoah tie up on the opposite bank of Mame Faye and along the bulkhead.

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Farther east is The Chancellor, with twin stacks arranged longitudinally.

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Still farther east inside LehighValley Barge 79, speakers like Jessica DuLong and Don Sutherland mesmerize with their tales and chronicles of the river.

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Captains Bill and Pam park their powerful machines to rest and enjoy the quiet of oars moving in and out of the fresh water.

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Rain showers come and go and no one cares.  Lined up behind Empire are Little Bitt, Gowanus Bay, Benjamin Elliott, and Margot. It’s another lazy day at the Roundup.

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What’s this on the foredeck of Bill’s Eighth Sea?  Looks like PVC, hairspray, and  . . . radishes?

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And Captain Fred has gotten involved.  This looks  . . .

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ominous, especially after he went to the supermarket for 50-calibre radishes, the most lethal kind.

aatdx2As dusk falls,  that same Captain Bill boards Mame Faye to maneuver the barge into the middle of the stream, which is now closed to traffic, for it will soon be time to

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see the scene change and

How to describe that:  part night harbor scene, rock concert, traffic jam, railroad crossing, cacophony, simulated war zone, kaleidoscope, popcorn popper, video game, confetti, aquatic bioluminescence gone wild, volcano, apocalypse .  . .   Oh, and I’ve always preferred seeing the flashes reflect in water to seeing them in air.

Now who do you suppose Mame Faye was?  Elizabeth toots Mame‘s horn here.

All fotos and video by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated . . .  the Dutch barge flotilla probably moves through the Hudson Highlands and northward today;  if you get good fotos and want to share, email me.

Imagine sport without scoring . . . the Olympics without medals . . . a tennis championship with statistics on “seeding”

boxing without weight divisions,

a softball game with neither umpires nor arguments,

a playground where the only rule is that everyone goes push and smile,

and then you’d have the beginnings of an idea of the Roundup, but there’s a lot more . . . like

the stories, reminiscences, ideas, joking,  planning, late summer sun and tropical storm torrents . . .  Roundup #11 is only 363 days away and 158 miles north of the sixth boro.  See you there.

Photos, WVD.

Darkness has fallen on the confluence in Waterford, and a bargeload of fireworks will mark the end of Tug Roundup #10.  Wisps of white pudding on the vessel to the left evidence what had happened under the afternoon sun.

But Gowanus Bay and Cornell were to clash again.

As did 8th Sea and W. O. Decker,   and

steamer African Queen v. the sheriff??  This was just posing, right?

More noses and more on the RoundUp soon.

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