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USMMA Foundation vessel Tortuga needed hands for a transit from Kings Point to Newport RI, where it is serving as support for Warrior Sailing program races this weekend.  I didn’t wait for a second call. I just needed to get there by 0250.  No problem, since this IS my favorite time of “day.”

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tug Elizabeth Anne at 0236 h.

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sunrise from the bridge of Tortuga at 0502.

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Past Port Jeff ahead of ferry PT Barnum  0638

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Passing Bruce A. McAllister with Vane barge on the wire along North Fork 0937

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Meeting ferry  John H near Plum Gut at 1002

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Seeing a distant ferry Cape Henlopen (?) and  S/V Mystic Whaler off New London 1030

Many thanks to Chris.

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UNREP from M/V Otter for second breakfast at 1035

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Passing S & S yawl Black Watch off Fishers Island 1042

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F/V Skipper off Point Judith Light 1259

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Schooner Aurora near Newport  1352

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Tortuga at rest as Warrior Sailing crew moves in 1615

 

Many thanks to Jonathan Kabak for the invitation.  All photos here by Will Van Dorp, and I have many more.

Click here for numbers on Long Island Sound.   Actually this trip involved the Sounds of Long Island, Block, and Rhode Island.

 

This post shows the second leg of what felt like an epic journey, but first let’s back up about 10 minutes.  See the small blue vessel just off the bow of Wavertree?

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It’s a King’s Point vessel, and leaning out of the house, it’s Capt. Jonathan Kabak, formerly master of Pioneer, Lettie G. Howard, and other vessels.

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So let’s resume . . .  the tow travels west of Caddell and rounds up against the tide, ever so

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gracefully–to my eyes–making its way to the dock.  Thomas J. Brown and later Rae working the port side.

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it took a full quarter hour to spin Wavertree 180 degrees and inch it across the KVK, but then the heaving line flew, followed by the dock line.

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Thomas J. and Rae worked this side in coordination with Pelham–invisible all this time from my perspective–on the starboard side.

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almost all fast

Lots of money will be spent and sweat expended before the NEXT leg of the journey.

The 2001 (or earlier??) photo below comes from Mike Weiss, SSSM waterfront foreman.  It shows a more complete rig.

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Also from Mike’s FB post, the photo below shows Wavertree in her Argentina barge days.  For the saga of Peter Stanford’s efforts to get this hull from Argentina to the sixth boro, read A Dream of Tall Ships starting from p. 221.  Actually, the whole book makes an excellent read.

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All photos except the last two by Will Van Dorp, who is eager to see Wavertree‘s transformation in the year to come.

From gCaptain, here’s a good explanation of National Maritime Day, yesterday.

 

I wonder what the forgiveness factor for ice-against-hull here is.  Bravest surely was pretty in our maybe soon-to-end Puerto Parcialmente Blanco.

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RB 45605 was the fifth in this series, which is numbered consecutively and now up to 45774.

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Must precautions be taken with these hulls during ice season?

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And finally . . . off the stern of Bering Sea yesterday it’s the current Kings Pointer.  This Kings Pointer started life as a solid rocket booster recovery vessel for NASA.

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Click here for another photo of this vessel in NASA colors.

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And here’s a photo I took back in August 2007 of the previous Kings Pointer, now known as General Rudder and based in Texas.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

The race may last for less than 10 minutes for (most) boats, but each participant spends hours before and after.  Here, using the power of thousands of conceptual horses and one very real donkey, all four vessels in Miller contingent make their way upriver.

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At Pier 66, crew on deck and crew below start them up.

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Lady B (read her interesting history here and here, the latter explaining that the “B” stands for either “Benazir” or Bhutto.”

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For boats that arrive on the scene early, Red Hook may have come straight from a job delivering bunker to Norwegian Breakaway, there’s time for what might look like lollygagging, and

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(in these next two shots from William Hyman) saluting the spectators or just

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being seen.  Does Seagus have another name?

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But it’s also getting acquainted time.

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Some regulars didn’t show, and other vessels arrived that I’d never seen before.

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I had to look up South River Rescue Squad attending the Great North River race . . .

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Somewhere in the attractively dressed race day crew on Jake-boat Resolute are two of the principals of tugboatinformation.com . . .  hi Birk and Craig, as well as the force majeure aka Rod behind Narragansett Bay Shipping.

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This kayaker stays well out of the stream.

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The white bowstriped vessel–Lt. Michael P. Murphy– in the distance won the prize for persistence, finishing the course in a historic half an hour . . . spending most of that time doing a mid-race-course onboard repair.

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Despite forecasts of storms–and rain north of the GW Bridge–the only lightning I saw was here and

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thunder from the crowds on the piers.  That’s the intrepid bowsprite showing us her drawing/painting arm.

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Spectators took advantage of any platform.

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More soon.   Thanks to William Hyman for his fotos, especially the one of an exuberant W. O. Decker, which I featured hard at work using Seth Tane fotos from over 30 years ago here.  Click here for John Huntington’s superb fotos from a wet place in the race . . ..

Again, my hat’s off to all who must work on Labor Day, including my son, who always works holidays for the higher hourly rate.  And if you’re inclined, read what Paul Krugman has to say about Labor Day.

There are many blues in the sixth boro . . . besides my own.  Saturday I caught an unexpected glimpse of King’s Point  Liberator.

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DonJon has their unmistakeable blue.

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But then there’s this one, which mesmerized me for the first time almost six years ago and when the vessel was just off the ways.

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Palva is a midsized vessel of the NesteOil fleet.

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And these blues are just part of their corporate colors scheme.

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No matter . . . I’m still captured by these colors,

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arrested and drawn in.

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Five years ago I wrote: “It’s the color of sky, water, twilight ice, and distant land.”  When Palva left for sea yesterday, it’s destination was Murmansk, possibly 11 days away.

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Murmansk . . . exotic though not  balmy.   Fair winds and frazil ice . . . if any.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who’s frustrated by wordpress interface changes which prevent the fotos from enlarging when you click on them . . . the way they used to.  If anyone has a solution, let me know, svp.

Working Harbor Committee win an award for perpetuating this event and calling it race AND competition.  And at the expense of making this post almost as long as some of those cinema and music award shows, I’d like to add some aditional awards . . .

like for “best improvised bowsprit on a tugboat” . . . Ross Sea,  [doubleclick enlarges all fotos]

“most spirited better-late-than-never”   . . . The Bronx,   [more The Bronx soon]

“best press boat disguised as a tugboat”  again, The Bronx,

“best connection to the cliff at Weehawken”  Sea Wolf,

“best crew-to-crew face off . . .

 . . . over a series of two fotos”  to Pegasus and Ross Sea,

“most crew rallying on the foredeck” Maurania III.

Next we have many line handling awards.  First up, “best right-hand follow through form” to Quantico Creek,

“best send the whole coil at once” to Sea Wolf,

“best hand and leg follow through form”   also to Sea Wolf,

“best mascot with cute purple antennae” also to Sea Wolf . . .  might this BE THE sea WOLF?

“biggest line-thrower cheering section”  Maurania III,

“best facial expression”  to Susan Miller,

“best overall posture award”   Ross Sea,

and now a break from line-throwing awards . . . best photographer-aloft . . . Shipshooter on Ross Sea.

“best  ‘make-that-line-walk'”   . . . also Ross Sea,

“most earnest line thrower expression”   . . . Catherine C Miller,

“best ‘looks-like-that-was-overhand'”   Freddie K Miller,

“best ‘over-the-bollard-and . . .

…put-turns-on-the-quarterbitt'”  Pegasus,

“best and longest lariat twirling followed by the

longest throw”  Growler.  Note for next year . . . the Growler crew might decide to dress as rodeo folk, given that the 30-second lasso-demonstration prompted a comment from some unnamed person behind me . . . “Next year for Growler we should replace that bollard with a fiberglass cow.”  Great showmanship!!

“best winch-matching costume” the inimitable Jeff Schurr, frequent and erudite commenter on this blog.

“best Lab mascot” . . .  Peaches on Ross Sea,

“best mascot with a hat and pin”  Salty of The Bronx,

And “my favorite mascot and name,”  goes to the bantam fowl named Jack E. Sparrow . . . of the mighty Sea Wolf crew.

You’re all winners in my book . . .  Get in touch if you want higher-res version of your foto.

Finally and last but not least  . . . two technical awards  . ..  for “best dredger”  Maurania III, and

“best watercolor creation” . . .  Sea Wolf.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s 2010, 2009, and 2008.  And here’s 2007, when I got the best race start foto but with a less good camera.  September 2006 predated the blog although I posted 2006 race fotos here, my third EVER post.

Many thanks to Working Harbor Committee and all their volunteers and sponsors as well as to the towing companies and their crews for making this event possible, even a week after Irene whirled through here.  Here’s my favorite action shot from today, Quantico Creek neck and neck with Maurania III as FDNY Three Forty Three misted them.   I’m not sure what the results of the race were, but my bias says everyone who participated or spectated–even before hurrying to baseball, tennis, picnicking, or what have you– won.

By 9:15 the table had been set;  bowls at the ready for the gourmet spinach tasting ritual, which I will spare you out of concerns for propriety and delicate palates.

The most prestigious cup in water sport waits.

By 10 am, 0n the safety boat, Capt. John Doswell, calls the parade to order.

The race committee checks radios, stopwatches and imaging devices.   Capt. Jerry Roberts stands on the bench.

NY-1 is there with camera;  here’s their reportage.

Crews waved as they passed the dais;  my special “enthusiastic wave” awards go to the crews of Ross Sea and

Susan Miller.

Nine tugs in all this year paraded

up to the start line,

just south of 79 Street.

Sea Wolf, tug nine this year, enthusiastically raced up to the start line.

From Pier 84 at precisely 10:33:56, I witnessed those puffs of smoke, evidence that the great race had begun.

Here a half minute later,  frothy “bones in the teeth” demonstrate that RPM as well as SOG and probably adrenaline levels have risen.

Vessels left to right are Ross Sea, Quantico Creek, Maurania III, and Pegasus.  As evidence of investment in the sixth boro towing industry, these boats were launched 2003, 2010, 2004, and 2006, respectively.

Top horsepower boats were (l. to r. ) Ross Sea (3400), Quantico Creek (3000), and Maurania III (4000).  As to design and function, the two tugs on the left push oil barges, and Maurania III does mostly ship assists.

Here are the smaller boats, l. to r. Pegasus, Growler, Sea Wolf, Catherine C. Miller, and Freddy K. Miller.  Type any of these names in the search window upper left and you’ll see what I’ve written about them before.

For Quantico Creek  and Maurania III  it was indeed

a foto finish.  This is NOT an official foto-finish foto.  Check back here for official “processed” results.

Vessel on the extreme right is Susan Miller.

Pegasus passes, and

as does the

rest of the field.

Check back here for results.

Tomorrow more reportage of the rest of the competitions.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who reminds you that unlike the farm tugs I put last month, these boats might already be back on the job this evening, Labor Day weekend notwithstanding.

A lot has happened here in 10 days, although the fotos here reveal none of it.  The sixth boro has its way of obscuring change, seasonal or otherwise.  I know folks within 10 miles of this waterway who have no power yet and who have tossed to curb-side trash picker-uppers most of their water-befouled furniture, appliances, books, etc.

But along the KVK, Chem Antares (ex-Sichem Unicorn) transfers fluids,  while

Torm Sara waits to do the same.  [Doubleclick enlarges most fotos.]

Kings Point Liberator inspects other vessels along the KVK.  I’d never guessed she had a wooden hull.

Sarah Dann froths eastbound.

My shot is a half second late as splash dissipates from this Ken’s Marine boat.

Note the water color here from  Marie J Turecamo and from

Ellen Bouchard.

Anyone identify this crew boat?

To get a sense of scale on ATB Freeport, note the two crew outside the wheelhouse.

So far, Freeport is the only of the US Shipping Partners 12,000 hp ATBs.  Some years back, I was fortunate to have caught one of their ITBs–Philadelphia– high and dry, here and here.  For an update on Philadelphia‘s current location/status, read Harold’s comment below.  Thanks, much . . . Harold.

Skiff in the foreground seems to be capturing flotsam planks for reuse.

Oh, by the way, four days  from now will be the sixth boro’s 19th annual tugboat race.  See you there?

All fotos today by Will Van Dorp.

Late summer sail might look like this, Clipper City motorsailing up the Buttermilk Channel past Caribbean Princess, and early autumn

sail like this: Gazela showing the flag in Oyster Bay.  The town dock here is roughly located in the former Jakobson yard, and that’s Growler and the Jakobson-built Deborah Quinn (1957, ex-W. R. Coe, Karen Tibbets, Ethel Tibbets)   across from Gazela.   W. R. Coe’s first work was for the Virginian Railroad.

Early autumn sailing can also look like this:  Breck Marshall‘s skipper standing while making her play in the wind.

Or this:  a heeled over Escape Plan.

or this: 1929 Summerwind playing a bit before headed for the Chesapeake Schooner race last month.

while on that same day Lettie G. Howard comes out of slumber to mingle with the likes of this

varnished catboat-with-a-blog named Silent Maid.

Getting later into autumn can mean mild weather and bright light over this aptly-named vessel–Persephone . . . preparing to head for the underworld or –at least–the southern approach to northern winter.

Or it can look like this:  skipper Richard Hudson beginning winter preparations as Issuma heads in the direction of its port of registry . . .  the Yukon.

More Issuma soon.

For now, as you make your own preparations for winter, check out this new Thad Koza 2011 Tall Ship calendar featuring a sixth-boro based schooner . . . . Any guesses?

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s Autumn Sail 2.  All fotos today come compliments of Melanie Lettau, who crews on A. J. Meerwald, below.  The occasion for the gathering down on the Chesapeake was

the annual schooner race from Baltimore to Portsmouth, VA.  Here are the results.  Below, it’s Sultana and Summerwind.  Summerwind, based at the US Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point, NY, was the Class AA winner.

Privateer Lynx finished third.

Lady Maryland–yes she is painted pink –finished fourth.

left to right, Woodwind (?)  and the curvaceous Shanty

And not to be omitted, with a second place finish, it’s Pride of Baltimore II.

A schooner that would have been happy to race last week–When and If-did not, since it’s for sale.  Who knows . . . some other participants from previous years but NOT on hand in 2010 might also be for sale.

Final shot . . . left to right:  Norfolk Rebel (the world’s only “tugantine”), Summerwind, Lady Maryland, and an unidentifed tug in the background.

All fotos by Melanie Lettau.  Thanks a bunch!

And some sixth boro autumn sailing pics coming soon.

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