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Today I pass a personal milestone . . . er, year stone, so the editors in Tugster Tower allow me to veer off topic . . .  first, to muse about the effect of picking up a camera and navigating life with it.  While I mostly photograph “sixth boro … and beyond” things that float, getting to and returning from the waters, sometimes I see other surfaces that beckon.  I love murals, especially.  That’s what these are.

First, I’d like to commend Monir’s Deli for a really smart mural.  I’ve never a sandwich from Monir, but the references in this strange assemblage of images compel me one of these days to stop by.  The mural also shows up in this profile of my neighborhood.   Yes, this is NYC . . .

Ditto.  Monir is in Queens, and Sofia’s on Staten Island.  I wonder who painted this first woman in a cocktail glass.  And where, when?  As with Monir’s place, I should stop by Sofia’s one of these days.

This mural was in Harrisburg PA.  I’m not sure what the reference is, but it was s a warm image on a cold day.

The rest here come from Bushwick Brooklyn.  The area at the head of Newtown Creek is certainly worth a visit.  Tagster 5 was based on a walk around there.

I find the one below disturbing.

Here below, I love the incongruity of ballet and boxing.  This outfit suggests some choreography needs doing . . . or improvising.

This is two murals:  one on the side of a truck and another behind it, painted onto the side of a building, with a sidewalk in between.

Here’s the same location shot 20′ to the left.

The chainlink fence adds a layer here.

And finally, the figure in the pigtails appears to be admiring–like me– the colorful foliage painted onto the building at the corner of Jefferson and St. Nicholas.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, taken while on the journey.

Here’s another focus for murals in the county where I grew up.

 

Click here for the 43 previous posts if you don’t understand the title.  If your thoughts on being the image below were of high heels sans the rest of the impractical shoe, mine were the same.  Of course, you can read Weeks 526 clear as day, so  . . . whatzit?

Here’s a bit more context.  That’s the Hudson River, old pilings for old Pier 55, I believe, just north of old Pier 54.

Piers of Manhattan once welcomed ships and ferries, cargo and passengers transitioned between land and water there.   Then people patterns changed and these piers little by little have transformed.

So what is it?!@#@!!

Come back in a few years and hang out at new Pier 55, the on–then off–then on again park idea funded for $250 million by Barry Diller.   The project reminds me of the vessel, another Heatherwick Studio creation.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, with a cell phone.   I’ve been losing a grip on patterns these days myself.

Before I started blogging, Pier 54 hosted the Nomadic Museum, for a half year or so.  I loved it.

 

WTGB-105 Neah Bay was the first vessel I saw along the Chicago shore . . . and thanks to a friend,

I decided that I needed to see the vessel beyond the lighthouse close up.

Previously, I’d seen it, but just imagined it was a replica.

Indeed not.  As it turns out, Abby has been Columbia Yacht Club ship since 1983.

Abegweit has a such noteworthy history that I wonder if

photos exist of her transit from the Maritimes to Chicago in 1983 . . .

Along the Chicago River, this classy wooden boat begs me to find out more info.

I then turned inland, where this poster lured me into the Chicago Cultural Center.  I knew of Alexis Rockman’s “Manifest Destiny” in the Brooklyn Museum.  I’d heard that among his many projects he was doing a well-researched series on the Great Lakes…

Six huge 5′ by 12′ panels and twice as many slightly smaller watercolors made up an exhibit.  As testimony to Alexis Rockman’s research, each panel had a key

or caption like this.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is satisfied with just seeing northern and central Chicago.

 

As this blog evolves, I sometimes try to show what’s up in those hills, as seen from the hills like this one in March 2017, instead of

what you see in instances when then light is unfavorable.

Olana is the hilltop mansion above the Rip Van Winkle Bridge, built by an artist whose commercial success allowed him to travel, become inspired by the 19th century “near east,” and scrap his plans to engage architect Richard Morris Hunt and instead design and build a neo-Persian palace on the site where once he painted with his mentor Thomas Cole, whose home was just across the bridge in Catskill.

The photo below looks down the Hudson Valley toward the south.

This looks along the south side of the house facing west and the town of Catskill.  Kaaterskill Falls is lost somewhere below the front of the jet trail.

Looking out a south side window, there’s a northbound tug/barge just barely visible.

Directly behind me are these treasures.  Mark Twain–see his own house here— once stood on that stage and discoursed on all things wise, hilarious, exotic,  and jaundiced.

I used the word “treasure” above because here’s a closer-up of that unit approaching from the south–it’s Pearl Coast with a cement barge.

And now a more focused view along the south side and toward the Rip . . . Bridge, see the tug/barge there southbound?

 

It’s Treasure Coast, with another cement barge.  I know there’s a work of Church’s with a steam ship on it, but it’s so far eluded me.

Olana is just one place up on the hilly banks, and so other many places along the river I hope to visit . . . one of these months or years.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has posted Hudson Valley photos here and here, and in many other places as well.

As to seeing Olana from the river, here’s what morning light does,

and here below, late afternoon.

Go visit Olana some time in 2018, and while you’re there, visit the Cole home across the river..

 

for sale, in this case.  I’m neither the seller nor an agent for the seller.  I’m just the messenger for “a serigraph wall mural attributed to Carl G. Evers, a depiction of the busy part of lower Manhattan accurate to  1876.   It’s huge:  six 10′ by 2.5′ panels. It comes with  four more [with] blank background. A small limited run released by James Seeman, it’s  never been displayed and in perfect original condition.”

The contact person [Sara] can be contacted at popsbasement24@gmail.com, and says, “My 90-year-old grandfather has strong ties to the seaport area.  He needs to sell it. I’m trying to find a private buyer or a non profit or someone who may buy it to donate to the museum. His main concern is that he wants it to be appreciated and seen.  I’m hoping to find the right person whose interested or may know the perfect person or place.  And, you can request to see the piece at its location in Staten Island.”

 

 

For a video showing the entire mural, click here.   For more of Evers work, click here and here.

Gift hunting, anyone?

I’ve not seen the mural, but I hope it get a new home soon.

 

 

 

Chicago’s River and NYC’s sixth boro share features, one of which is efforts of artists to attraction flighty attentions to the water, and one hopes to the next step . . . realization of commercial possibilities of the waterways.

What’s this?  Here’s a start.

Here’s the next question:  whose head

is memorialized in yellow?

in duplicate and

why is this significant?

Answers later.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

 

Happy September 3, 

and August 2

and  . . . well, someone’s vision of  the moment or a zeitgeist,

heritage,

zeitgeist,

heritage,

zeitgeist,

heritage…

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who thinks that’s where a tension exists.

 

Here were previous installments of this.

These images are intriguing.  They challenge the brain.  Have I seen these before somewhere?

In a dream maybe?

These are on a building near the midtown cruise terminal.

But here  . . . recognize these on a building along the major avenue?

They conjure up historical Assyrians passing laws?

And this, a pensive monster or a befuddled one?

What context is there for a fragmented horse and human?

What provokes a playful crow and evolved wolf reading about fig or olive branches, or is it something else like an herb in a cookbook?

It’s all surely not comprehensible but

the animals in both places

command attention.  They may be shards of a half-remembered nightmare, or

parts of an undiscovered heritage.

Photos of a repositioning from NYC to Chicago by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’m told this vessel from bottom of keel to mast tops measures more than 8 feet.  Can you identify its location?  Here’s some more info:  “Marcus T. Reynolds designed the weathervane atop the center tower, a 400 pound replica of the Half Moon, which is 6 feet, 9 inches long and 8 feet, 10 inches tall, and the largest working weathervane in the US.”

The photo above was take in March, and the one below  . . . in February 2017.

It spins with the winds incessantly atop this building and will never make it to the major river less than a quarter mile beyond.  Know it?  It was built for a railroad and now it’s a university administration building.

Here’s a photo I took in September 2012 from the Hudson side.  The weather vane looks like a mere speck.  It’s less than a mile from the northern end of the Port of Albany oil docks.

And here’s the answer.  The source of the quote is here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has done many previous Half Moon posts here.

 

I love the drawing and the name on the flag.  You know the artist, of course?

drsuess

That Essomarine stuff and staff must be magical.    Sam I Am?  Nope, Suess he was an oilman.  

sd1

Got $1000 for a copy of his rare Secrets of the Deep?  Here’s another rare one –at least I’d never heard of it until today–for under $18, and the power boat drawing comes from it.

pj2

No naval architect was Suess, but I’ve liked it for well over half a century.

sdsd

It’s good stuff though.  You can find these images at the Antique Boat Museum in Clayton NY.

Click here for SD posts 1 — 22.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

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Seth Tane American Painting

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