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It’s June, and I’m starting my 176th month doing tugster.  Wow!  how many hours might I have put into this now? 

June 2011 saw some interesting sailboats and boats.  This post mentions only a few and covers the first half of the month.

The Dyna-rigged Maltese Falcon was in town, sailing at 20 kts across the harbor and then dousing all sails almost instantly at the push of a button. She’s currently in Messina, IT.

Blue Marlin was in town and spent three weeks loading US tugs and barges sold to Nigerian interests.  Most of these names–Dean Reinauer, Curtis Reinauer, Janice Ann Reinauer, and John Reinauer–have been re-used on quite different tugboats.  “Three weeks to load a Float on-float off . . .?” you might be wondering.

Well, there were some setbacks with ill-fitting cradles.

Eventually, everything found its place and stayed there. 

I recall taking photos from Fort Wadsworth and overhearing some folks concerned “the big orange ship” was sinking.

Sixth boro haze that June made for some dull photos.  If you want to relive the ordeal of loading, click here for the tugster six-part “groundhog day” series.

Reefer Albemarle Island got assistance into the Red Hook terminals from Brendan Turecamo and Margaret Moran. Currently, the reefer is running between Martinique and Panama.

EPA Bold came into town;  the 1989 USNS Vigorous has changed hands several times and is now operated as Bold Explorer, an EGS survey vessel.

The 2007 Barbara C became Arabian Sea and is currently Saint Emilion.

The 5100 teu Cosco New York gets an assist from Miriam Moran.  Currently, she’s running south along the western Mexico coast.

We began with a luxury sailing vessel;  Black Seal made one run into the sixth boro with a cargo on cacao from Dominican Republic.  The three-masted schooner is currently at a mooring in Pocasset MA.

Let’s lleave it here for now, with all photos, WVD.

 

Way back in 2007 I started this series, and I now think I should never have called it “bronze” since it’s more like a golden brown, but no matter, this post is all the same fleet.  Name the fleet and the tug?

Talking fleet renewal . . ., Reinauer has a young fleet.  Janice Ann is not even a year old . . .

Laurie Ann, here with Grace D alongside, is just over a decade old.

Dean is not quite a decade at work.

Curtis came out the same year as Dean.  By the way, I didn’t identify the photo in the top photo yet.  Figured it out?

Morgan is the oldie but goldie . . .

Haggerty Girls is about the same age as Dean and Curtis . . . i.e., a young fleet.

All photos, recently, WVD.

And the tugboat in the first photo is . . . Dylan Cooper.

 

The light could not have been more beautiful as I swooped into the boro, metaphorically speaking:  Peace Victoria in the foreground, Coral Queen (not the other Coral Queen) loading scrap mid-distance, and that ridge the Watchung Mountains defining a horizon.  Note the Tsereteli monolith mid left margin of the photo.

Closer than Peace Victoria, Zola dispensed Egyptian rock salt.

Note the front end loaders shifting salt within the scow?

Down at water level, Curtis Reinauer squeezes into the notch of RTC 42.

Helen Laraway heads over to Zola to shift scows filled in  the salt dispensing.

Jill has been called to assist Curtis out of the dock, 

passing Nicole Leigh at the Reinauer base, adjacent to the Moran base, marked by the white “M”.

The assist begins and

soon Curtis is eastbound. 

And this is just the start of my focus of 1/100th of the doings in the boro.

All photos, taken between 0700 and 0800, WVD.

Entirely unrelated but fascinating, here’s a NYTimes article and video on oil smuggling into North Korea.

A new tug in town . . .  Osprey?  Built in 1961, she’s a sibling of Kodi.  Photo thanks to Tony A.

B & B . . .  it’s Brendan Turecamo in the distance and Bruce A McAllister.  It turns out they are not clones:  Brendan is a year newer, and Bruce A. is few feet longer and packs a few more horses.

Curis Reinauer is the third tug to carry that name.  This Curtis dates from 2013.  The previous one was sold to Nigeria, and the one before that has been reefed.

Emily Ann dates from 1964;  she appeared on this blog just a few weeks ago but out of the water then.

Mister Jim, 1982,  has been in the sixth boro for about eight years. 

Doris Moran, also 1982, is a powerhouse.

Navigator, 1981, is the only boat currently operated by Balico Marine Services.

Gulf Coast, 1982, got her upper wheelhouse up at Feeney‘s on the Rondout.

Patrice, 1999, has so far spent half its life working on the Great Lakes.

Shannon McAllister is a rare one in the sixth boro, but she passes through here once in a while. like this week. She dates from 1991.

Thx to Tony for that first photo;  all others, WVD.

Blessings of summer heat, if you don’t have to work out in it, are best relished right after dawn, or from the shade.  I chose the first option here as Barney Turecamo, made up to Georgia,

gets an assist in rotating from Turecamo Girls.

Once pointed, a burst of power from its 5100hp EMDs commits the ATB to its course.

Foxy3, with its bright trim ribbons gleaming in the dawn, is off to the job.

Doubleskin 57 arrives from somewhere in the Kills and Elk River

waits to assist Wye River

 

in placing it alongside the dock gently.

Marjorie B is off to some work, followed by and Poling & Cutler and Vane units.

The P & C unit was Kristin Poling pushing Eva Leigh Cutler.

On another day, Mister T was arriving from outside the Narrows

just as the sun cleared Bay Ridge.

And yet another day and different place, Curtis Reinauer waited alongside RTC 82 during cargo transfer.

 

All photos, WVD.

Followingup from yesterday and “…maybe it’s time for new permutations of truckster, teamster, bikester, autoster, planester, hutster, hikester, storyster, . . . ” let me say you’ve sent in some great ideas which I’ll follow up on in the next few days.

For now, let’s glance back 10 years to April 2010.  Any idea what this is all about?

Indeed, it was the arrival of 343Here‘s the post I did on that event.

A perennial harbor towing star is the Thomas J. BrownHere‘s the post with these now reposted photos.  What’s amazing to me here is the fact that two scows are being towed on a single hawser attached front starboard side of the lead barge.

Maybe there’s a term for this, other than brilliant?

Currently a tug operates through the harbor with the name Curtis Reinauer. Actually it’s the third boat with that name.  The one depicted below, 1979, the second iteration, is now in West African waters.  The original Curtis was reefed, although I haven’t located where.

APL Japan, with its port of registry as Oakland CA, was built in 1995;  since she appears not to have moved in some months from its anchorage in Gulf of Khambhat, I’m guessing she’s scrapped, although I can’t find evidence of that.

I count 15 containers across on the stern.

And finally, Steve Irwin, the Sea Shepherd boat, was in town in April 2010.  It has since been retired, was slated to be scrapped, but then saved as a museumship and is currently in Williamstown, Victoria in Australia.

The post I did on Irwin back then did not include the photo below, and

although I included the photo below, I did not comment on the ports of registry given, Rotterdam AND Kahnawake.  Now that I recognize what that is, I’m wondering about that relationship.  how many other vessels are Kahnawake registered?  Here‘s part of the story.

All photos here, WVD, taken in April 2010.

Stay healthy.

Denali arrived in the sixth boro for the first time about three years ago, and I compared her with a fleet mate here. I believe that fleet mate is now scrapped.

If you’ve never seen a tug out of the water, here’s a sense of that.  I’ve done other “dry hulls” photos, as you can see here.  These photos of Denali come from Mike Abegg.

A lot of traffic passes through the East River, like Foxy 3 here.

That appears to be a scrap barge, a commodity that gets concentrated along the creeks and in ports along the Sound.

Buchanan 12 must earn its owners a lot of money;  it seems always to be moving multiple barges of crushed rock . . .

 

 

Curtis Reinauer here heads for the Sound pushing

an 80,000 barrel barge, if I’m not mistaken.

All photos, WVD.

When the temperatures drop and days are short, tug and barges units in the NE get busier than in summer.

RTC 42 here gets pushed by Franklin Reinauer, as Gracie-above–waits at the dock with RTC 109.

 

A bit later, J. George Betz moves her barge B. No. 210 toward the east.

Navigator appears from the east with her barge.

 

Barney moves Georgia toward a Bayonne dock, with assistance from Mary.

 

And Curtis comes in with RTC 81 for more product.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, currently in the state of Georgia, but a few days back when I took these, needed some of that fuel to stay warm. Here from 2007 was my first post by this name.

OK, if old songs make for “classic rock,” then old photos of tugboats could be called classic roll or pitch, yaw, or some such.

Let’s start with one from March 2008 . . .  American Patriot over NW of Shooters Island as seen from the Port Elizabeth shoreline.  I’ve no idea why she was here and have never seen her again.

Given recycling of names, check out Dean Reinauer of June 2008 over by Gracie Mansion.

Same time period, here’s the Curtis Reinauer of that era.

Labrador Sea . . . she’s the first boat in this post that’s still around here.

Emma M. Roehrig  has changed colors twice since 2008 and has not been in the sixth boro for at least five years, maybe longer.

Great Gull still around back then.  She’s gone down to Panama.

And finally, June 2008 saw the transition from the Roehrig fleet into the K-Sea one.  Note the new name on the nearer tug although the colors were still Roehrig.  Aegean Sea had been Francis E. Roehrig.  The farther tug had been Vivian L. Roehrig, renamed Caribbean Sea under K-Sea, and now still works in the boro as Emily Ann.   Did Aegean NOT have a mast?

All photos from a decade ago by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’m happy to lead with two photos Lydia Wong took last September when CMA CGM T. Roosevelt arrived on her first voyage into the sixth boro.  Like “new car smell” T. Roos carried an atypically uniform CMA CGM container load, at least along the edges; they’re ALL blue.

When Lydia took these, I was somewhere on Lake Michigan or its edges.  Since then, T. Roos arrived three more times, but it happened in the dark hours, or I was either away or distracted.

So last week, I was ready to camp out just to get these photos.  A camp out was unnecessary, the weather was mild, and –although cloudy–the light was not half bad.

First thing I noticed was the typical mosaic of container color, mostly non-CMA CGM.

Joan and JRT pushed her stern around Bergen Point

while James pulled on the bow;

Margaret did what all was needed on the starboard side.

For comparison, here’s a post I did a little over a year ago of a smaller CMA CGM vessel rounding this bend.

 

Traffic was light, so I got onto Brooklyn turf before she cleared the Narrows.

CMA CGM’s fleet of 74 ULCS, i.e., ultra large container ship, one carrying more than 10,000 boxes, ranks it third;  currently the largest fleet of ULCS is MSC (90), with Maersk in second place with 86 ULCS.  Here’s more detail on those numbers.

Thanks to Lydia for use of her photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp, who can’t help but imagine that ULCS must be a near-rhyme with “hulks” in its gargantuan meaning.

 

 

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