You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Caitlin Ann’ tag.

Here are previous iterations, just to change things up.  Non-random here means I took these over a few weeks, which should be obvious as you look through the photos.

Atlantic Enterprise . .  . she’s big at 136′ x 40′.  Over the past few years, she has appeared here.  Before that, she was in the sixth boro but much less active as Barents Sea. She had different names before Barents going back to 1976.

Although slightly older than Atlantic Salvor, the two boats appear to be mostly similar. An Atlantic Salvor tow I’ll always remember relates to the WTC antenna here.

Some companies have a crew boat.  Behold Matthew Scott, a 1968 Gulf Craft 65′ x 16′.

When I first saw Caitlin Ann, she was called Vivian L. Roehrig.

The 79′ x 24′ tug keeps busy.

Hidden behind this barge,

it’s Sarah Ann, who i first knew as June K

I did a post on Brian Nicholas some years back.  I don’t recall ever seeing her as Banda Sea, but in this post from June 2009, that name was still showing . . . .

My favorite photo of Paul Andrew over the years

is this one, showing the 64′ x 23′ tugboat getting transferred, so to speak.

Mary Alice is one of the larger DonJon boats, at 92′ x 27′.

We’ll end with another shot of Atlantic Enterprise, distinguishable from Salvor   (my photo during the tugboat race September 5, 2010)

by that fire monitor.

Other DonJon boats– Meagan Ann, Emily Ann, Rebecca Ann, Thomas D., who else  did I miss–I’ve not seen so far in fall 2020.

All photos, WVD.

Mary Alice with Witte 1407

 

Brendan Turecamo with container barge New Jersey

Sarah Ann with SMM 105

 

A light Stephen B passing the Lady

Caitlin Ann with SMM 211 and a light Emily Ann

 

Galveston with Petrochem Producer and a surveillance bird

And–to repost a photo from April 2018–guess where Iron Salvor is today . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose curt post today are dictated by a tank low on verbiage today because my reserves are being used on other projects .  ..

Iron Salvor, the one above, is currently in Malta, that English-speaking island in the Med!!

Yesterday was a day to hold onto to your hat . . . or tighten the straps.

Ruby M splashed in toward the Kills, where Maersk Vilnius was exiting, but it was the yawl Mah Jong

that appeared to thrive in these conditions, passing Corpus Christi‘s stern.

Meanwhile Caitlin Ann delivered the netted paper to the recyclers.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who stood at a diagonal into the wind while snapping these shots of the sixth boro.

Here–for the most part–are previous winds and windy posts.

Let’s start with the photo I did NOT get, but jag9889 did;  click here to see Resolve Commander and (in the photo stream) the barge it towed Thursday carrying the remaining TZ Bridge structure out to sea.   Bravo jag . . . . I’ve long enjoyed your work.

The photo below raises some questions . . .  not because of Mary Gellatly, which has long been there, but because of the MSRC Responder vessel beyond it and tied up at the Sandy Hook Pilots’ dock.   Something’s happening here. . . .  I don’t believe it’s the local New Jersey Responder.

Stephen Reinauer headed out the Narrows, and shortly thereafter,

Dace came in, offering a comparison of the outline of the two boats.  Stephen dates from 1970, 3000 hp, and 100.2 loa;  Dace, 1968, 3400, and 108.8.

Below we can do a different comparison:  Dylan Cooper, 2015, 4720 hp, and 112.2;  Lincoln Sea, 2000, 8000 hp, and 118.6.

 

L. W. Caddell is the yard tug at the repair yard.

Emily Ann, 1964, 3000 hp, and 89.4.  My favorite story about this boat formerly called Cabo Rojo (among other names) can be found here.

Emily Ann crossed paths with Caitlin Ann, 1961, 2400 hp, and 78.9, here moving a light scrap scow.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Behold the Atlantics  . . . being A Salvor with the dump scow Witte 4003  and

A Enterprise . . . with the Chesapeake 1000. It’s delightful to see them now as twins, which they are, but hadn’t appeared to be.  Before we move to the next pictures, though, what are the “poles” beyond the dump scow?

The ridge is the highlands of Monmouth County above with West Bank Light below.

Mary Alice and Atlantic Salvor have been shuttling quite a few dump scows the past few weeks, it seems.

 

Caitlin Ann–which I first saw as Vivian L. Roehrig and later as Caribbean Sea— followed Enterprise in.

Different day, different towing arrangement . . . Atlantic Salvor returns with a light dump scow Weeks 258.

Caitlin Ann heads under the Bayonne Bridge, past its dismantled piers.

And the “poles” belong to  L/B Vision coming into the harbor with

her 95′ spindly spuds.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Call it a sea change.  The air warms up although the water is still very cold.

Sea Lion does what it has all winter, but what’s different is the reappearance of non-workboats.  Sea Lion has some history on this blog.

Evening Light moves north in anticipation of summer.

Pleasure boats move into an environment that has been consistently about work throughout the winter.

Mischief passes New Champion and Stephen Dann, which brought in highway ramp sections.  Would these sections be for the Bayonne, the Tappan Zee, or another?

Small party boats

head out to catch what spring fish migrate in. Should there be a Really Never Snuff Express?

Bigger party boats appear as well.

Fast open boats and

slower enclosed cruisers, of all sorts

pass Atlantic Salvor as it returns from another dredge spoils run.

Norwegian Escape has smaller boats

accompany it on its way into the Narrows and the harbor.  If my numbers are correct, Escape has capacity for 5999 souls, including crew, which is more than the population of Taos, Marfa, and well more than the town where I grew up.

I’ve not seen many of these smaller boats since early last fall, and on a warm Sunday, they start to reappear.  Drive safe; work safe.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose other posts about small craft can be read here.

 

Patricia was built in 1963 and works in the sixth boro here and here, and last I knew worked for C.H. Phoenix LLC of Green Cove Springs, Fl. . . .   I like the racing stripes.

Caitlin Ann was built in 1961 and has worked for DonJon since 2011.   Here, she and

Sarah Ann appear to be moving coal.  Sarah Ann is from 2003, working for DonJon since 2009.

Marion Moran has worked by that name since 1982.  I think that’s Katherine Weeks on the far side of the barge.

Bruce A. McAllister, 

Eric McAllister, and

Alex McAllister were all working from the Narrows the

other morning.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Happy winter!

The photo below is from July 2015, and it’s how and where I expect to see James E. Brown.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

So you can imagine how surprised I was to see James E. yesterday where I did, so join me in the experience.  I had to squint to understand this, squint and wait.  At first I thought it was a carfloating job that took a wrong turn.  Then I wondered why the railcars were so small.  Still later, I realized

jeb1

that what my eyes identified as boxcars were

jeb2

actually large I-beams.

jeb3

But when the tow got to the south end of Newark Bay,

jeb4

 

jeb5

they went north into the Hackensack.  I’m not sure what work is happening up there.

That’s a handsome boat, that James E. Brown.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Given the glorious sunshine, the transition from summer to fall begs another series.  Let’s start with Maule, 

fe1

2/3s of her escort, and

fe2

a fraction of her crew.

fe3

Following in Maule‘s wake, Helsinki Bridge arrives, here with half its escort.

fe4

McKinley Sea traverses the Upper Bay and passes

fe5

UBC Mobile.

fe6

In the harbor was Cordula Jacob and Seastar, as seen from two angles.

fe99

with some ferries and a Miller’s Launch crew boat.

fe7

Caitlin Ann and

fe9

Miss Lizzy work the AK and in the

fe10

KVK, for the last day, there are two glorious ships with bright futures . . .

fe11

 

fe12

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

x

 

Let’s start with Marie J. Turecamo (1968).  And then let’s look at others out around this springtime morning:

0art7

Like Joan Turecamo (1980), built near the confluence of the Hudson River and Erie Canal,

0art999

heading out here with James D. Moran (2015);

0art2

Caitlin Ann (1961) doing a recycling run;

0art1

Emerald Coast (1973) leaving the U-Haul;

0art3

North Sea (1982) heading for the Kirby yard;

0art4

Robert E. McAllister (1969) heading out for a ship;

0art5

Quenames (1982) moving a barge alongside;

0art6

Crystal Cutler (2010) getting some maintenance; and

0art6b

that brings us back to Marie J. Turecamo and a photo taken only a minute of so before the lead-off photo in this post.

0art7b

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,427 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

December 2020
M T W T F S S
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031