You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Joyce D. Brown’ tag.

Mornings on the KVK can be busy.

Above, Sea Fox (1971) follows Barney Turecamo (1995), and below, Kimberly Poling (1994) is followed by Mary H (1981)

Kimberly Turecamo (1980) and Marjorie A. McAllister (1974) head east to escort different incoming ships.

Chesapeake Coast (2012) assists Gulf Coast (1982) moving the cement barge out into the current.

Bruce A. (1974) and Patrice McAllister (1999) hasten out for work.

Thomas A. Witte (1961 when she was called Valoil) returns to Port Newark.

Joyce D. (2002) passes the docked Normandy (2007).

And Cape Canaveral (2019) makes for her yard.

All this and much more during a few hours one bright, mild morning recently by WVD.  Any errors, my blame.

Sea Fox as a cold front moves across the Upper Bay.

Mary Turecamo off to the next job.

Dorothy J returns from an assist.  I’ve lots more photos of the assist to post soon.

Joyce and James eastbound in the KVK to start the work day.

Dean Reinauer heads over to fuel up.

Kings Point going over to Gowanus Bay.

Brooklyn going to pick up her barge.

Fells Point returning from a job.

The very busy Patrice waiting for a ship as Dobrin heads over to her daily projects.

The always moving Brendan making money, as all these boats and crews are. 

And finally Sea Lion outbound in the Lower Bay.

All photos, WVD.

 

Note the line boat off B. Franklin‘s starboard.  Also, faintly to her port and beyond the green buoy hull down is a Kirby tug, probably one of the Cape-class boats

Actually part of the same scene panning to the left–note the line boat on the extreme right side of the photo–it’s Joyce D. Brown with a crane barge off to do a salvage job.

Not long afterward, Caitlin Ann heads west past Treasure Coast on the blue-and-yellow cement carrier.

Brendan Turecamo and Margaret Moran bring a ship in.

Kirby Moran follows a ship in with a Reinauer barge right behind.

And again, a few minutes later, Paul Andrew follows the Reinauer unit and the ship westbound.

Resolute, back in the sixth boro, heads out to assist a USN vessel into Earle.

Genesis Victory passes Doris Moran alongside the Apex Oil barge,

Another day, l to r, it’s Barry Silverton, Saint Emilion, and the A87 barge again. Barry‘s sister vessel–Emery Zidell--was in the sixth boro recently, but I got just 

a very distant photo.

 I can’t put names on these vessels, but it’s the Wittich Brothers fleet, formerly (I think) known as Sea Wolf Marine.  And I see Sarah Ann in the extreme left. 

And let’s end on a puzzle . . .  William Brewster with a new paint job.  Last time I saw her, those dark green stripes were red. 

All photos, WVD.

 

 

This series I use to feature others’ photos that are different from what I typically shoot, different in either location or perspective or subject.  I am very grateful to you, readers,  when you send these photos in.

David Silver sent this in just yesterday, taken in Norfolk.

Down in Norfolk, Mike Vinik and Rhino had just finished a tow there, and stopped by David’s workplace. I visited Vinik No. 6, Mike, and Rhino earlier this year, although it seems several years ago now. In case you’re wondering, Rhino weighs in at a trim 140 pounds.

Xlime promenaded along the East River  in Brooklyn the other day and saw some sights.   She writes:  “I happened upon three Brown tugs this morning – Thomas, who’s always so picturesque and the mighty James and Joyce (a literary pairing) who I’ve seen together twice now bringing reinforcements to the piers project in Brooklyn Bridge Park. I happened to be on Pier 3 this morning when they pulled up. Okay, maybe I doubled back when I realized where they were going. “

I’d never thought about the literary ring of these names. 

 

A few (2013!!) years ago Brad Ickes sent me photos of Cable Queen.   Recently she was hauled out and here are the photos he sent.  Brad writes:  “Queen was just cleaned up, repainted and made pretty again.”

 

Pretty she is, and I still hope some day catching her at work.

 

 

One more here . . . although I found this on youtube . . .  a streaming music/light show on Bannerman’s Island, coming up in a few days.  Tickets are available now. 

And a last one, survey vessel Shearwater was working at the Narrows the other day.  Her track on AIS illustrates what she was doing.

Many thanks to David, xlime, and Brad for use of these photos.

Behold an entire fleet, and the current boats of a family business operating boats in New York since 1927.

The Brown family boats are distinguished by their color and meticulous condition. 

 

Maybe you can’t tell by their condition, but one of these boats dates from 2015, one from 2002, and one from 1962.  Styling may give it away, if you don’t just already know.

With all this foggy weather fading out the background, the green livery and polychromatic trim really pops out.

 

 

 

Off to work.  In case you don’t know, Thomas is from 1962, and James . . . from 2015.

All photos, WVD.

There’s this below from ancient Roman vineyards in Gaul, near this  monolith church . . .  Also, about 30 miles away in Bordeaux is the repurposed WW2 submarine base . . . repurposed for art. But I started out beyond left field here and have digressed in an even more oblique direction.

Saint Emilion is this tugboat with angles . . . and three rectangular windows, wheelhouse and upper wheelhouse . . .  Note the difference in lines with Joyce D. Brown.

She’s angular indeed, a bit reminiscent of a Nighthawk.  The livery of white with yellow trim accentuates these angles.

To see the time of her transformation from Barbara C to Arabian Sea, click here and scroll a bit.  To see her in many jobs as Arabian Sea, click here.

Anyone know why Apex chose this name?

Compare many points of her random partner on the KVK, above and below.

 

All photos, WVD.

 

 

On we go . . .  Alexandra does not appear frequently here. If my count is correct, this is only the third time since and including 2008 that this 120′ x 34′ 4000hp boat’s been posted here.  She’s currently working on a dredging project near Sandy Hook.

An action shot here of Mister T doing what the 82′ x 24′ 2400hp Mister T does.

Pegasus has to be among the cleanest looking boats, a fact accentuated here by the rusty stains on the hull of the tanker beyond her.  Dimensions . . . 75′ x 26′ x 1900hp.

The Browns . . . James  and Joyce, move this car float across between Owls Head and Greenville.  The absence of leaves on the trees shows how long ago I took this and most of these photos.  They are 74′ x 30′ x 1000 and 78′ x 26′ 2400, respectively.

Patrice, 105′ x 34′ 4500, has been here almost 10 years.

Nathan G, 73 x 24′ 1200′, moves a scow  westbound on the KVK.  I’d have guessed her larger than that.

Paul Andrew does the paper barge.  She’s 64′ x 23′ and 1200hp.

And finally, JRT sees one ship out and positions herself for the next job.

Here was my first photo of the 6000hp 89′ x 38′ tugboat back in late 2015.  The photo reminds me I should use the fisheye more often.

All photos, WVD.

Today it’s all light, technically.  Other than that, this set is all sizes, all ages, all powers, and all shapes.

Let’s start with  Gabby L., built in 2007 (?), 25.9′ x 13.7′, and rated as 660 hp.

Comparing that, check out Genesis Vigilant, which I first met as Michigan Service, (same order of numbers) 1981, 89′ x 28′, and 3000 hp.

Emily Ann, ex-Solomon Sea, ex-Brandon Roehrig and ex-Diane Roehrig, 1964, 89′ x 28′, and also 3000 hp.

Sea Fox, 2012, 69′ x 24′, and 1400 hp.

Joyce D. Brown, 2002, 78′ x 26′, and 2600 hp.

Fleetmate Thomas J. Brown, 1962, 61′ x 19′, and 1000 hp.

As I said before, technically light but about to engage the Seaspan ship, Jonathan C, 2016, 89′ x 38′, and 6000 hp.

And since we started out with Gabby L, let’s end there also, but you may have to look carefully to the left of the VZ bridge towers . . . . to spot her.  As I said before . . . all shapes and sizes, but they all work a niche in the sixth boro.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I didn’t hear any wind speeds for yesterday, but it was blowing . . . winds of November according to the date, but fortunately not a November witch.

Chem Wolverine scudded through the Bay,

Kings Point went on with her routine,

Gabby Miller returned to home base,

Joyce aimed for the Kills,

Mister T slung a scow, 

Crystal pushed Patricia E. Poling,

ONE Ibis had some containers shuffled after spending time off Long Beach,

Fort Schuyler dispatched Double Skin 30,

and Chem Wolverine, on her way to Albany, passed Dace Reinauer.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wishes a safe day to all.

Previous excessively windy days posts can be found here.

Melville explains Ishmael’s signing onto the whaling ship as related to that damp, drizzly November in [Ishmael’s] soul, but this series shows that a windy, dark October can trigger running away too.  I’m thrilled that today’s forecast calls for sunshine, and some reason for optimism.  Here are previous weather posts.

A few days ago we arrived in the sixth boro under clouds swept along by winds.

Someone who’s not been along Manhattan for a few decades would not recognize the city.

Rebecca Ann assists a scrap scow alongside Nordic Barents, a bulker I saw on the Saint Lawrence discharging ore less than month ago.

 

Joyce D.  is likely over to assist James.

DAT’s Dong-A Metis and Humen Bridge transfer cargoes in Bayonne. DA

T (Dong-A-Tanker) seems an odd name for a PCTC RORO.

A container ship, rusty from the oceans, passes the salt pile over along Richmond Terrace.

RTC 145 moves out of the Kills

with all the horsepower supplied by Christian.

All photos last week by Will Van Dorp, who’s now heading out to enjoy the sunshine.

 

xx

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