You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Marquette Transportation Company Offshore’ category.

Identity and ownership or affiliation can be read from vessel stacks.  Seeing the photo below with the gray, blue, and gold rings over a white stack . . .  you might know that could be only one of two vessels, USNS Comfort, which it is, or USNC Mercy.  Other USNS or Military Sealift Command vessels have appeared here on this blog.

CMA CGM Thames is one of many large (1100 to 1200′) container vessels in the world’s fourth largest container shipping company.  No vessels from the two largest container shipping companies are shown in this post.  Do you know what these companies are?

Hansa Meersburg is a much smaller containership, less than 600′,  that appears to run a feeder route between the Caribbean, Canada, and New York.

Seatrade has their “colour class” vessels, only slightly longer than 600′ but they offer lots of reefer capacity for round-the-world trade.:

This is a tug . . .  Andrea, recently re-logo’d from HMS to Centerline Logistics.

Mr Connor counts as an exotic, a Marquette Transportation Offshore vessel.  Another Marquette vessel that’s called here is Miss Emily.

Cosco has a number of 1200′ container vessels calling in the sixth boro, this one being Hope.  Moore on this huge conglomerate can be found here.

APL expands to American President Line, Ltd, a company that can trace its history back to before the Civil War.  Currently is a Singapore register company, part of the CMA CGM group.   Confused yet?    Yang Shan is a deepwater port, an island off Shanghai, created since the year 2000.

The BW Group, begun in Hong Kong,  is involved in many aspects of the energy trade.

SCF expands to Sovcomflot.  Victor Bakaev was Soviet Minister of the Merchant Marine from 1954 until 1970, and more.

Fairchem Endurance

And let’s end this post with Hyundai Merchant Marine vessel Hyundai Hope.

All photos recently by WVD, who hopes you notice some patterns here.

 

 

May 2010 . . . I took my first trip to see the thrills of the southern Arthur Kill, thanks to Bonnie.  Back then the hull of Astoria (1925-1967 on the East River Line) was still there. Since then, I believe it’s been removed  . . . said to be an eyesore.  !@#$?!!  Here’s more from that paddling trip.  Keansburg Steamboat Company operated it until it ended up here. If I read The Boats We Rode, Roberts & Gillespie, p.13) right, I’m wondering why it spent so many years before being broken up. And why isn’t it listed here?

ABC-1 was hauled out back that month. I know some of you are happy to see what she looks like below the waterline.

OSG Vision was new, and spent some time at the Bayonne shipyard. Here she’s nose-to-nose with Horizon Discovery.

I recall vividly this spectacular spring morning before work . . . Irish Sea went by pushing DBL 103, passing NYK Rigel at Howland Hook.  Mornings like that tempted me to skip work.

I’m not sure where this boat is today, but I did manage to get close-ups out of the water here, three and a half years later.

Heather M II here passed NYK Rigel.  I’ve never seen Heather M since, I believe, but she has classy lines and a great bow pudding.

Colleen was still in salt water back then.  I’m not sure she ever thawed out after a late December transit to Lake Michigan six years later.

Janice Ann, here pushing RTC 28, was still around here.  If you want to read about life aboard Janice Ann, I did a review of a book written by one of her captains here.

Niz C. Gisclair was an exotic in town, likely here working on a dredging job.  She has a Marquette logo on her stack.

Sorry about the backlighting here, but it’s Allied’s Falcon in the Kills. She has since appeared on this blog as Carolina Coast.

And finally .  .  . a sad shot of sister ship of Day-Peckinpaugh, launched as Interwaterways 101.  The vessel below was launched two months later as Interwaterways 105, and from 1936 until 1976 operated as Michigan. She’s languished in the AK for decades, possibly since 1976.  She’s an Eriemax, tailored to the dimensions of the Barge Canal locks, built in Duluth 99 years ago!

Here’s the same vessel on the Erie Canal, date and photographer unknown.

Yup . . . after 18 days of virtual Erie Canal touring, I needed to sneak another Erie Canal pic in here.

All photos except the last one by WVD.

 

Secret salts sometimes send along photos, and I appreciate that, since many waterways I’ll never see . . .  and that means boats I’d never encounter, like Reliance, 1979, 127′ x 40;’

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Grand Canyon II, an offshore construction/ROV/IRM vessel, shown in this link getting towed from Romania to Norway for completion; and more.

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Here’s an unidentified Marquette Offshore boat with an unidentified Weeks crane barge,

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Paraclete . . .  look that word up here  and then see the rest of the names in her fleet,

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Gulf Faith, 

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USCGC Cobia

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Gulf Glory and an unidentified Algoma self-unloader,

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and finally a WW2-era tank-landing ship turned dredger and named Columbia, ex-LST-987.

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All interesting stuff from Mobile, Alabama.   Hat’s off to the secret salt.

Here’s the index to all previous posts in this series.

For today, all come from Jed . .  John Jedrlinic.  Any ideas on the locomotion of the person nearer than Diane Moran, photo taken in Miami in February?

DIANE MORAN

The Thomas Dann photo is from almost a year ago.

THOMAS DANN

Ditto . . . Schuylkill, taken in Norfolk last May.

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Ditto . . . Jed took this photo of the 1960 Marion in St. Maarten.

MARION

MARION

Mr Chester and

MR. CHESTER

Miss Niz . . . Miami, February 2015.

MISS NIZ

Allie B has been a favorite of mine since I caught photos here and here or her departing for the Black Sea this time eight years ago.

ALLIE-B

Finally, the closing shot is Diane Moran without the guy on the jet ski.

DIANE MORAN

Many thanks to Jed Jedrlinic for these photos.

You might conclude that in this city I do nothing except sit on the riverbank, but the better conclusion is that Nola river traffic volume is phenomenal.  So here’s a sampling of another–say–two hours total traffic, beginning with a vessel that would look entirely at home in NYC’s sixth boro . . . it’s J. George Betz.

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Next something you’ll not see except in the inland big river, O. H. Ingram, 185′ loa x 54′ 9200 hp and triple screw,  pushing

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at least eight barges heading into a turn with at least two oncoming tows:

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Joe B. Wyatt, 170′ loa x 45′ 6120 hp twin screw,  pushing 18 barges and Mr. Pete with a single, but they all squeeze around the turn.

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The range of vessels is interesting, considering the likes of Lil Susan S

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and Josephine Anne of Bisso Offshore, with Wise One in the distance.

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Natalie S . . . and

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Blessed Trinity .  .  . and

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and Natures Way Commander . . .

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Moose . .  and

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CSS Savannah . . . and less than two hours have elapsed and I haven’t included all the traffic!

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and let me conclude with a photo taken the previous afternoon, another that would NOT look out of place in NYC’s waters, Greg Turecamo.

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More soon.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

To pick up where yesterday I ended . . . Chemical Transporter is not a ship.  Rather it’s the barge married to–or at least in a relationship with–ATB Freeport.

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This Workboat article makes clear the circuitous and costly ($91 million !@#@!) route this 150′ tug followed from keel lay to launch.

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I’d love to see the interior of this 2007 vessel.

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R. L. Enterkin is a tug I’ve seen on AIS for a long time, but the other day,

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I finally got a close-up as she went out to pick up a “tail job” at sunrise.

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At the head of the tow was Layla Renee.

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Click here for many posts I’ve done on Resolute.

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Thomas D. Witte–here passing off Wall Street– has carried many names since 1961.

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Zachery Reinauer was launched nearly a half century ago at Matton Shipyard . . . up above the Federal Lock in Troy and right across the river from the boyhood home of Herman Melville.

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Ellen . . . focus of countless tugster posts… as

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has Brendan Turecamo.

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HMS Justice–NOT this one–debuts on this blog with the photo below, which almost makes it appear she’s equipped with her very own drone…. but there must be an illusion happening there.

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And to close out this post . . . from M. McMorrow . . . the most intriguingly named tug of all . . . Tug of War.

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The last photo from Mike and Michelle McMorrow, who’ve contributed photos here before.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

First . . . this foto by Bob Dahringer of Katherine (1979 in Louisiana).  As of this writing, Bob is back upriver playing with Hudson River ice cubes.

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Next . . . this foto from Key West, thanks to my sister, who’s gotten a camera upgrade.  Yay!  A few years ago, I was snorkeling–sans camera–off a Key West beach and came up to notice two tugboats that looked a lot like these.  My first thought then was–wow!  K-Sea tugs in the Conch Republic.  My second thought was . . . I have no camera and therefore no one will ever believe me.  I’m now pretty sure I saw Titan (1974 in Long Beach, CA) and Ocean Atlas (1964 in San Diego, California).

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Brian DeForest took this foto of Marjorie B. McAllister (1974 in Louisiana) last week of a very icy sixth boro.

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And recently . . . in a springy waterboro of NYC, Brendan Turecamo (1975 in Louisiana) assisted a tanker on its way out to sea,

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Doris Moran (1982 in Louisiana) assisted a chemical tanker into port, and

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Miss Niz  (2003 from Alabama) moved some dredging equipment around.  Note the survey boat–Michele Jeanne–reading the bottom contours over on the Bayonne side.

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Thanks much to Bob, Maraki, and Brian for use of their fotos.

. . . aka a jumble.

I took the foto below of Stephen  L. Colby (St. Louis, MO-built, 1967, 144′ x 40′) on 1/4/2013 in Cairo, IL.  Yesterday, the boat sank into 14 feet of water farther north on the Mississippi.

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Below, s/v Concetta meets Charles D. McAllister (Jacksonville, FL, 1967, 94′ x 29′)  in late October.

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Twin Tube (Blount, 1951, 64′ x 19′)  passes the polytube rack.  If you click on the link in the previous sentence, you’ll see the very next completed Blount project was of Ceres, a “grain elevator.”  A google search turned up no fotos.  Anyone know of any?

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I took this foto a week and a half ago.  Currently, Grande Sierra Leone has left Dakar bound for Cotonou, passing the older Grande Buenos Aires en route.

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Bow Hector in the Kills a few days ago . . . now in Morehead City.   Bow! Hector!

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Taft Beach . . . shuttling dredge spoils, inbound.

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Sludge tanker North River noses past 118,000-bbl  barge Charleston.

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On Marathon Day, this was Explorer of the Seas ( I think) approaching the Narrows, as seen past the stern of Transib Bridge.

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A few days ago . . . it’s Challenge Paradise.   I wonder if that’s ever a command. . . .

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And at the same moment, crude oil tanker Felicity.   By the way, I passed between felicity and challenge paradise . ..  steering clear.   Both vessels are currently southbound off the coast of the Carolinas.

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Finally, in the Buttermilk, it’s MAST’s r/v Blue Sea, passing Wilson Newcastle and McAllister Responder.    Responder and Charles D. are two of the triplets built near the end of the run at Gibbs Gas Engine, currently a place to sleep and stroll.   The last time I saw Roderick-the third triplet– in the sixth boro was here.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s a first-timer for me in the sixth boro . . . Miss Emily, a saltwater member of the huge Marquette Transportation fleet.  Look carefully and you’ll see she sports equipment not commonly seen here.

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One of my favorite harbor vessels . . . now called Ellen McAllister, used to do gray-work in Holy Loch, Scotland.  Here’s more on Holy Loch and its role in the Cold War.

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Zachery Reinauer was built upstate at Matton 42 years ago.

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Kristy Ann Reinauer, 51 years old, offers some style hints of 1960s trucks like this one. 

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I’ve no idea how long Harry McNeal has worked the boro, but she was launched in Louisiana in 1965.

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Ditto my question on history of Robert IV . .  who launched in Louisiana in 1975.

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Ruth M. Reinauer is the mother of facet tugs launched in Rhode Island around a half decade ago.

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Discovery Coast might be the newest tug in this installment.  It’s the creation of Frank Basile, whose bio as written by Brian Gauvin can be found here.  For a portfolio of his work, click here.

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JoAnne III Reinauer, a 1970 vessel with a 2008 aluminum tower is one of the more unusual tugs in the sixth boro.  For a before-after look on tugster, click here.

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Finally, a 1980 Oyster Bay, NY built vessel . . . now called Siberian Sea.

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And that equipment unique to Miss Emily . . . it’s this knotted rope escape system.  To see this in use, look at fotos 7 and 8 in this tugster post from three years ago.

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All fotos taken–with icy fingers–by Will Van Dorp, in the past few days.

It sounds like the green stuff some bunnies and humans like to nibble on.  It can be organic when it relates to crystals, but not much more.  No, EO’s Yeoman Brook is not a snow-making operation at Staten Island’s most frequented ski slope.  And yes, that four-bladed clover is the most organic shape here besides the white dunes.

Here’s a veritable lattice garden.  That’s drill vessel Apache approaching, an unidentified Moran tug over by the bridge.  No, that’s probably not a moveable bridge (Sorry, Brian) or a removable bridge.  In silly conversation recently, a friend and I concluded we preferred removable  britches  to removable bridges.

Railings galore and flat plating.

Racks and railings and vessels and arms . . .  straight lines encasing a very few curves.  What you’re looking at here is a Reinauer barge foreground with a chemical tanker beside the hose rack.

More of same on CSCL Sydney.  Note the focus on the face of the man in the middle window.

Parting shot for now . . . Emily Cheramie, Apache, Yeoman Brook.  Other shapes soon, more organic ones . . .  less lattice and more . . . tomato.

A silly post with fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Click here and scroll through for a several years old article about drillship Apache in New York harbor.

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