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I had no idea what I was seeing until I zoomed in on it here and recognized it as one of the small Miller tugs with a deck barge.

Linda L Miller heading across the Upper Bay, where

QM2 was in port.

Later, I saw Linda L sans barge, passing two anchored Reinauer units.

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A couple days earlier I saw this and initially failed to identify what I was looking at.

I took photos anyhow and then realized it was Miller Girls with the northeasterly wind splashing a mess of water over the bow.

Here from earlier this year are photos of Miller Girls in a previous lifetime, 1974.

Earlier this year I’d seen her with skimming outriggers on, working in Poughkeepsie.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Melville explains Ishmael’s signing onto the whaling ship as related to that damp, drizzly November in [Ishmael’s] soul, but this series shows that a windy, dark October can trigger running away too.  I’m thrilled that today’s forecast calls for sunshine, and some reason for optimism.  Here are previous weather posts.

A few days ago we arrived in the sixth boro under clouds swept along by winds.

Someone who’s not been along Manhattan for a few decades would not recognize the city.

Rebecca Ann assists a scrap scow alongside Nordic Barents, a bulker I saw on the Saint Lawrence discharging ore less than month ago.

 

Joyce D.  is likely over to assist James.

DAT’s Dong-A Metis and Humen Bridge transfer cargoes in Bayonne. DA

T (Dong-A-Tanker) seems an odd name for a PCTC RORO.

A container ship, rusty from the oceans, passes the salt pile over along Richmond Terrace.

RTC 145 moves out of the Kills

with all the horsepower supplied by Christian.

All photos last week by Will Van Dorp, who’s now heading out to enjoy the sunshine.

 

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The blog is called tugster, and not tatter, taster, tagster or truckster, as much fun as those digressions may be, being able to be a bit obsessively focused, this is the 249th installment!   If you add in the non-random tug posts, it’s even more than 249.

W. O. Decker, the only wooden-hulled tug in this post. Built in Long Island City in 1930 and 52′ loa.

Christian Reinauer, built 2001 in Mobile AL and 118′.

Haggerty Girls 2013 built in North Kingston RI and 110′,   and I think,  Dean Reinauer 2013 in North Kingston RI and 112′

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Ellen McAllister, … 1967 in Sturgeon Bay WI and 102′ and she’s been a staple in the sixth boro for as long as I’ve been paying attention.  A former YTB, she works–it seems– every day.

Paul Andrew, … 1968 in Loreauville LA and 63′.  She too has been working the harbor since I’ve been paying attention. 

Jill Reinauer, … 1967 in Houma LA, and 91′ loa.

And to round things out with a photo I took in September 2017–all others have been since mid-February–it’s Sarah D, built 1975 in Palatka FL [Mary Kay, 1973 in Palatka FL] and 90′.  She has appeared on this blog fairly recently. 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wishes you warmth today.

Now about tats and tasting . . . those might be franchise expansion ideas . . .

Ivory Coast

Christian Reinauer

Ross Sea

C. Angelo

Scott Turecamo, New Hampshire, and Brendan Turecamo

Curtis and RTC 82

Mary Alice and Nan Lin Wan

Pearl Coast and Cement Transporter 1801

MSC Maureen, Jonathan C. Moran, and Kirby Moran

All photos taken in April 2018 by Will Van Dorp.

 

Another day I went out and lots of Reinauer boats were around, like Gracie M., which I’d not seen up close.  Launched in the second half of 2016, she’s the fourth of their Twins series and the newest vessel in  the fleet.   Here’s the first Twins post I did and here’s another where she appears.

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Curtis has slightly less hp than Gracie M and follows the B. Franklin line.  

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Christian came by;  at 7200 hp  and dimensions of 118′ x 40′, she’s a big boat.

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Here’s Christian in profile.

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Zachery is one of the oldest in the fleet, built at Matton up near the Canal, and formerly a Mobil tug.

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Now that we have a few different classes already in this post, you can see that Dean, like Gracie M, follows the Twins class.

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B. Franklin, mentioned earlier, spawned Curtis, so to speak.

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And here’s another slightly different angle on Gracie M. 

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The photo below I took in Auguast 2006.  Subtle differences are visible in the background, like the color of the cranes over in Erie Basin.  The slightly different shade of bronze and red may be due to the fact that I used a different camera.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

It’s been a while since #2 in this series, but seeing Rebel this past week prompts a new installment.  What first drew my attention was the sound;  Rebel roared as it backed a light barge out of IMTT.  Double click on foto to enlarge.

The superstructure was one I didn’t recognize.  Huge she is: 138′ x 46′ x 22′ deep draft with air draft of 82′ and 7200 hp.  Notice how small Ross Sea (ex-Normandy) seems in spite of her 95′ x 32′ x 14′ and 3400 hp.  I wonder if Rebel‘s air draft is with antenna down.

Given the sound and the ease with which the barge extracted from the dock, I was surprised that Rebel has not more than 7200 hp.  Notice Nathan E. Stewart with potable water barge Aqua passing on the far side of KVK, and a

few minutes later, that’s Rebel and Ross Sea pursuing Taurus, nearing the KV buoy.

In comparison, here’s Christian Reinauer: 124′ x 40′ x 22′ with air draft of 85′ and also 7200 hp.  Christian came into service in 2001, whereas Rebel has worked as Toya Alario and  Patricia E since 1976.

In comparison with the two above, here’s a shot of Vane Brothers Brandywine from this weekend:  launched in 2006, Brandywine’s dimensions are 123′ x 38′ x 22′ deep.  Here’s a foto of the house interior for Brandywine, and youtube of launch of Christiana, Brandywine‘s twin.    I’d love to see an interior shot of Rebel and Christian.  Anyone help?

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

PS:  For sights we don’t see in the sixth boro or anywhere out east, click here for Fremont Tug, running out of the Puget Sound.  I like the stories and the fotos, especially ones of  Seaspan Commodore and the log barges, as well as the adventures of Stinger and Dixie.

Seeing the Moran boats on the upper left side of this foto reminds me that I owe you an answer to Relief Crew 9‘s question, which herinafter, shall be dubbed the “tugsterteaser,” term coined by Jed.  Tugster teases maybe but always delivers.  Answer comes thanks to Harold Tartell:

“The year of that photo would be early 1962.  The M. MORAN (brand new but  doesn’t look it) has returned to New York from Pusan, Korea after towing a floating generating plant for the U.S. Navy.  She left her builders (Gulfport Shipbuilding in Texas) in Oct. 1961 and made the tow from there directly to Pusan.  The MARIE S. MORAN built in 1961 (now TERESA McALLISTER) and sister MARGARET MORAN (now BRIAN A. McALLISTER) were both built in 1961 by Dravo Corp., Wilmington Del.  They were on charter to Moran with an option to buy.  McAllister took them over with the same agreement later that year, and ended up buying them.  They were the first two tugs in McAllister’s fleet single screw with Kort Nozzles.”  Thanks Jed and Harold!

So back to more posteriors.  After reading the bottom paragraph of this post, decide whether to some the expression should be “negatively posterior”?

L. W. Caddell is a 1990 built 16′ breadth tug working around the Caddell yard.

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Christian Reinauer, 2001, 40′ breadth.

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Pati R Moran, 2007, 36′

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Zachery Reinauer and Thomas J. Brown, 1971 and 28′ and  1962 . . . 19′.

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Rosemary McAllister, 2008, 36′.

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And while we’re looking at sterns, here’s an unexpected detail on Peacemaker, a boathouse behind the fold-down stern.  Bowsprite sends along this foto.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp, except the last one.

And some discoveries lead me to reiterate my creative commons licensing.  Fair is fair.  More on this later.  But please comment on this:  what should I do if unauthorized use of my work turns up?  What would you do?

This could be called “How to identify a tug:  start by recognizing fleets.”  Long neck and short stack . .  or vice versa.  Bound for  the North River are McAllister Responder with tall ringed stack and Norwegian Sea with tall orange-tipped house and mustard stack.

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The height of wheelhouse matters not:  tall orange-and-black house here–along with the black stack–makes it a Hornbeck, and this case, it’s Gulf Service.

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Short red-and-white ringed stack–it’s Ellen McAllister.  And the baby-blue stack with DT on it is Dann Ocean Towing’s Comet.  By the way, I haven’t seen Dann’s Allie B since her departure for Rumania late last winter.  Anyone spot Allie B?

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Black stack with a bold M . .  it’s Moran.  In this case, it’s Miriam Moran, out to rustle up a ship.

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In this case, the mustard stacks identify this vessel as a K-Sea . . . .it’s Falcon, with her low stern.

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The stack color on Reinauer boats has much the same mustard color–at least in this light–but the addition of the diamond and the red . . . is unmistakeable.  In this case, it’s Christian Reinauer.

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Most prominent feature of this vessel–foto taken in the drizzle yesterday–is not the stack at all, but the color and superstructure shape. Anyone know?

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It’s Cheyenne –or Crow–of course.  In this case Cheyenne.  Close up of Cheyenne‘s stack soon.

Last one . . . has no stack at all and I’ve run it before.  It’s a mystery ship taken by bowsprite about a month ago and we’d love to get an identification.  Help?  Foto was taken from Lower Manhattan looking toward Jersey City;  vessel headed upriver.  Aliens . . . discovering the river, perhaps?

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All fotos except the mystery ship by Will Van Dorp.

I think of the phrase “ships passing in the night.”  Random encounters also happen at dawn  (like Donald C and McAllister Brothers),

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December afternoons (like Maryland and Evening Mist), or

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mid morning ( like Aegean Sea and Laura K Moran), and every hour in between.  Sometimes they prompt a spin for second glance,

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sometimes they lead to joined forces (like Jill and Kristy Ann Reinauer) and other times

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there’s  just a perfunctory  wave as they steam by (like Thomas D. Witte and Christian Reinauer)

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The challenge is to know when to steam by, when to get a second and third inquiring look, and when to form alliances.  Form ye alliances while you might . . . hmmm . . . is that like “Gather ye rosebuds while ye may . . .”?  Rest of Herrick’s poem is here.

Photos, WVD.

Left to right, it’s Linda Moran, Danielle M Bouchard, unidentified K-Sea, and Ruby M.   Anyone know the air draft on Danielle?  And plenty of room remained for others

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like Amy C. McAllister, Ruby M (again), and Ghetty Bottiglieri, of Torre del Greco.

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Then Coral Queen took advantage of the narrow channel to overtake Maersk Donegal, ex-Santa Priscilla.

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Finally another Bouchard tug passing also respectably huge Christian Reinauer.

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All photos, WVD.

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