You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Christian Reinauer’ tag.

I’m posting early today and can’t guarantee I’ll be able to move this on to FB the next few days because I’m traveling.  So, sign up to get new posts straight to your email.  Also check the note at the end of this post.

Here’s one that got away:  the tug to the right is the 1975 Mary Emma, ex-Evening Light.  I’d been waiting in St George hoping she’d move from Mariner’s Harbor eastbound.  Finally I gave up and boarded the ferry.  Partway to Whitehall, I noticed she was headed east, right past where I’d been.  Once in Whitehall I boarded the next ferry south, hoping to get photos near the St George side.  It’s not a great shot and it would have been if only I’d stayed put . . .   but life is full of as many missed opportunities as fulfilled ones. 

Sarah Dann (1983) recently made a big move of a crane from Wisconsin to Maine, a longer trip by water than by land.   Two years ago, she made another long tow with components for a refinery.

Franklin Reinauer (1984) has been based in the boro and carried that name since she came out of the shipyard.

Osprey (1961) is a recent newcomer to the sixth boro.

Christian Reinauer (2001) is the most powerful of this batch, with 7200 hp moving her payload.

A year ago Eastern Dawn (1978) was still painted white.

Andrea (1999) came here without the upper wheelhouse.

Thomas D. Witte (1961) and James E. Brown (2015) pass each other in the Back Channel.

Diane B (1980) seemed to drift through this part of the channel the other day. 

And finally, I believe,  Morton S. Bouchard IV (2004) is the only remaining Bouchard tugboat over at the stack in Stapleton. When will her transformation to Jesse Rose begin?

All photos, WVD, who has left the boro for a while.

By the way, a few days ago I made up some 2022 calendars, of which 17 are left for sale. I used a subjective process for selection this time. More details later but if you’re interested, email me your interest and your address. Send no money at this time, please, but prices will likely be up a tad because, of course, politics.

To highlight the variety, this post will focus on size, horsepower, and age.

Matthew Tibbetts, 1969, 92′ x 27′, 2000 hp.  All numbers rounded up if  .5 or more.

Brendan Turecamo, 1975, 107′ x 32′, 3900.

Crystal Cutler, 2010, 67′ x 26′, 1500.

Bruce A. McAllister, 1974, 112′ x 30′, 4000.

C.F. Campbell, 1975, 100′ x 31′, 3400.

Ava M. McAllister, 2018, 100′ x 40′, 6770.

Saint Emilion, 2007, 105′ x 38′, 4800.

Christian Reinauer, 2001, 119′ x 40′, 7200.

Magothy, 2008, 100′ x 34′, 4200.

All photos, WVD.

Two blog-related issues:  Sarah Dann and the big blue crane are now below Quebec City.  And, bidding has begun on Grouper and Chancellor.

 

Solo and over along the Connecticut shore last week, it’s Joker, with her distinctive lines and livery.

The other dawn, Ava M. was returning from a job.  It was sunny and clear, but with all the rain of the previous day, lots of moisture remained in the air.

Taken an hour or so later, Eastern Dawn passes those same hoses and that ship, Chem Neon.

The top photo here was of a single vessel;  the next two had two each.  Beyond Christian Reinauer are two tugs and a ship to the left, and one tug to the right.

Normandy is front and center, but I count two tugs, a tanker, and a tank barge in the background.

Ditto here:  the seldom-seen (by me)  Christine M. McAllister with lots of activity in the background.

See what all is happening here:  in the foreground l to r, Kirby Moran, Treasure Coast, Miriam Moran, Sarah Ann, and Marjorie B. McAllister.  In addition, there are two tankers and a cement barge.

All photos, WVD.

And since I’ve not seen Christine M underway in quite a while, enjoy another shot below.  I count at least four vessels beyond her.

If you follow this blog, you know I look for novelty:  new vessels, new roles, new perspectives I don’t always even initially or ever understand.  Here’s for me a new boat, Cape Fear, 2018, another Sassafras class tug.

 

Brendan Turecamo, 1975,  has appeared here many times, but in the past week, I’ve seen her in two configurations, doing ship assist below and

slinging barge Connecticut below.  Yes, it’s the same tug, house down or house up.

With the bronze monument, aka Teardrop Memorial, in the background, Marjorie B. McAllister delivers nearly a dozen rail cars on NYNJ100

to cross over the harbor from NJ to NY. The run is usually performed by Brown tugs.

Chemical Pioneer, a sixth boro icon, here is assisted into the anchorage by  . . . Franklin Reinauer.

Matthew Tibbetts stands by as Dylan Cooper (correct me if I’m wrong) with RTC 108 lighters Gulf Coral. 

Taking a break from the dredge project over by Sandy Hook, Neptune travels west in the KVK.

Sea Lion pushes a barge westbound on the East River, past the old banana pier and Vladick Houses of the Lower East Side in the background.

Ivory Coast stands by with an Express Marine (former owner?) barge over in the Wallabout section of the East River. 

Christian Reinauer and barge RTC 145 stand by over in the anchorage below Fort Wadsworth.

And finally . . .  over in Red Hook, Eastern Dawn hangs alongside Meaghan Marie. Stand by for a new paint job of Eastern Dawn.

All photos, any errors, solely mine, WVD.

I had no idea what I was seeing until I zoomed in on it here and recognized it as one of the small Miller tugs with a deck barge.

Linda L Miller heading across the Upper Bay, where

QM2 was in port.

Later, I saw Linda L sans barge, passing two anchored Reinauer units.

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A couple days earlier I saw this and initially failed to identify what I was looking at.

I took photos anyhow and then realized it was Miller Girls with the northeasterly wind splashing a mess of water over the bow.

Here from earlier this year are photos of Miller Girls in a previous lifetime, 1974.

Earlier this year I’d seen her with skimming outriggers on, working in Poughkeepsie.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Melville explains Ishmael’s signing onto the whaling ship as related to that damp, drizzly November in [Ishmael’s] soul, but this series shows that a windy, dark October can trigger running away too.  I’m thrilled that today’s forecast calls for sunshine, and some reason for optimism.  Here are previous weather posts.

A few days ago we arrived in the sixth boro under clouds swept along by winds.

Someone who’s not been along Manhattan for a few decades would not recognize the city.

Rebecca Ann assists a scrap scow alongside Nordic Barents, a bulker I saw on the Saint Lawrence discharging ore less than month ago.

 

Joyce D.  is likely over to assist James.

DAT’s Dong-A Metis and Humen Bridge transfer cargoes in Bayonne. DA

T (Dong-A-Tanker) seems an odd name for a PCTC RORO.

A container ship, rusty from the oceans, passes the salt pile over along Richmond Terrace.

RTC 145 moves out of the Kills

with all the horsepower supplied by Christian.

All photos last week by Will Van Dorp, who’s now heading out to enjoy the sunshine.

 

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The blog is called tugster, and not tatter, taster, tagster or truckster, as much fun as those digressions may be, being able to be a bit obsessively focused, this is the 249th installment!   If you add in the non-random tug posts, it’s even more than 249.

W. O. Decker, the only wooden-hulled tug in this post. Built in Long Island City in 1930 and 52′ loa.

Christian Reinauer, built 2001 in Mobile AL and 118′.

Haggerty Girls 2013 built in North Kingston RI and 110′,   and I think,  Dean Reinauer 2013 in North Kingston RI and 112′

.

Ellen McAllister, … 1967 in Sturgeon Bay WI and 102′ and she’s been a staple in the sixth boro for as long as I’ve been paying attention.  A former YTB, she works–it seems– every day.

Paul Andrew, … 1968 in Loreauville LA and 63′.  She too has been working the harbor since I’ve been paying attention. 

Jill Reinauer, … 1967 in Houma LA, and 91′ loa.

And to round things out with a photo I took in September 2017–all others have been since mid-February–it’s Sarah D, built 1975 in Palatka FL [Mary Kay, 1973 in Palatka FL] and 90′.  She has appeared on this blog fairly recently. 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wishes you warmth today.

Now about tats and tasting . . . those might be franchise expansion ideas . . .

Ivory Coast

Christian Reinauer

Ross Sea

C. Angelo

Scott Turecamo, New Hampshire, and Brendan Turecamo

Curtis and RTC 82

Mary Alice and Nan Lin Wan

Pearl Coast and Cement Transporter 1801

MSC Maureen, Jonathan C. Moran, and Kirby Moran

All photos taken in April 2018 by Will Van Dorp.

 

Another day I went out and lots of Reinauer boats were around, like Gracie M., which I’d not seen up close.  Launched in the second half of 2016, she’s the fourth of their Twins series and the newest vessel in  the fleet.   Here’s the first Twins post I did and here’s another where she appears.

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Curtis has slightly less hp than Gracie M and follows the B. Franklin line.  

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Christian came by;  at 7200 hp  and dimensions of 118′ x 40′, she’s a big boat.

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Here’s Christian in profile.

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Zachery is one of the oldest in the fleet, built at Matton up near the Canal, and formerly a Mobil tug.

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Now that we have a few different classes already in this post, you can see that Dean, like Gracie M, follows the Twins class.

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B. Franklin, mentioned earlier, spawned Curtis, so to speak.

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And here’s another slightly different angle on Gracie M. 

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The photo below I took in Auguast 2006.  Subtle differences are visible in the background, like the color of the cranes over in Erie Basin.  The slightly different shade of bronze and red may be due to the fact that I used a different camera.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

It’s been a while since #2 in this series, but seeing Rebel this past week prompts a new installment.  What first drew my attention was the sound;  Rebel roared as it backed a light barge out of IMTT.  Double click on foto to enlarge.

The superstructure was one I didn’t recognize.  Huge she is: 138′ x 46′ x 22′ deep draft with air draft of 82′ and 7200 hp.  Notice how small Ross Sea (ex-Normandy) seems in spite of her 95′ x 32′ x 14′ and 3400 hp.  I wonder if Rebel‘s air draft is with antenna down.

Given the sound and the ease with which the barge extracted from the dock, I was surprised that Rebel has not more than 7200 hp.  Notice Nathan E. Stewart with potable water barge Aqua passing on the far side of KVK, and a

few minutes later, that’s Rebel and Ross Sea pursuing Taurus, nearing the KV buoy.

In comparison, here’s Christian Reinauer: 124′ x 40′ x 22′ with air draft of 85′ and also 7200 hp.  Christian came into service in 2001, whereas Rebel has worked as Toya Alario and  Patricia E since 1976.

In comparison with the two above, here’s a shot of Vane Brothers Brandywine from this weekend:  launched in 2006, Brandywine’s dimensions are 123′ x 38′ x 22′ deep.  Here’s a foto of the house interior for Brandywine, and youtube of launch of Christiana, Brandywine‘s twin.    I’d love to see an interior shot of Rebel and Christian.  Anyone help?

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

PS:  For sights we don’t see in the sixth boro or anywhere out east, click here for Fremont Tug, running out of the Puget Sound.  I like the stories and the fotos, especially ones of  Seaspan Commodore and the log barges, as well as the adventures of Stinger and Dixie.

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