You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Catherine Turecamo’ tag.

A few days ago I stumbled into a rabbit hole and enjoyed it down there.  I won’t stay in 2008 for too long, but evolution I found in the ship department intrigued me, change change change. It also made concrete the reality of the scrapyards in  the less-touristed ocean-margins of the globe. Take Orange Star;  she’s scrapped now and another Orange Star delivers our juice.  But what a beauty this juice tanker is,

with lines that would look sweet on a yacht. Laura K has been reassigned to another port.  This  Orange Star was cut up in Alang in October 2010.

Ditto Saudi Tabuk.  She went for scrap in November 2013.  The tug on her bow is Catherine Turecamo, now operating on the Great Lakes as John Marshall.

Sea Venture was scrapped in January 2011.

Hammurabi sold for scrap in spring 2012.   She arrived in Alang as Hummura in the first week of summer 2012.

Some D-class Evergreen vessels have been scrapped, but Ever Diamond is still at work.  Comparing the two classes,  the Ls are 135′ longer and 46′ wider.

Stena Poseidon is now Canadian flagged as the much-drabber Espada Desgagnes, which I spotted on  the St. Lawrence last fall.   Donald C, lightening here, became Mediterranean Sea and is currently laid up.

And let’s end this retrospect with a tug, then Hornbeck’s Brooklyn Service and now just plain Brooklyn.  She’s been around the block a bit, and I’ll put in a link here if you want a circuitous tour. I caught her in Baltimore last spring in her current livery.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders what the waterscape will look like in 2028, if I’m around to see it.

My trickster truckster hopper is filling and will dump one of these days soon, but this photo fits better in the “seats” category.

But to put this back on the water, here’s the power seat on ex-Catherine Turecamo now John Marshall.  I’d love to see this vessel in her current colors and working in her current environment . . . the tri-state ports along southern Lake Michigan.  I wonder if this is the original 1972 seat.  For the photo, thanks to Mike Fiedler, who also sent along this photo of the helm seat for Lake Express here (scroll).

Here she was in the East River in 2008.

To take on a Peacemaker with a 50-horse Boston Whaler look-alike, your seat must provide a sense of power.

Now this is a well-appointed seat of power, currently a training seat for other seats of power.  It’s Pentagoet (1980), platform for tug and barge skills acquisition at Maine Maritime.

Can you identify this seat of power?  The exterior colors could be a giveaway.

The “sticks” move the rudders on Grand Erie, flagship of the Canal Corp, former Mississippi River system Corps of Engineers pusher tug.

Any ideas of this?  I’ll call it the mystery seat until the end of this post.

Here’s a clue:  those are my shoes and below the seat is a glass floor.

Here is the locus of power award Fournier Tractor (1984), which currently works mostly in Penobscot Bay.  I took these other photos of the Maine boats here almost five years ago.

And the last seat of power comes from George Schneider.  Orange is the color of Edison Chouest.  George writes:  “It was 2011, and I was sent out on the ROV support ship MAX CHOUEST while they did an ROV survey of the wreckage of the DEEPWATER HORIZON.  The MAX, of course, is dynamically positioned, and so the operator needs to have all the DP displays nearby, plus controls to tell the system how to maneuver the vessel.  But being a workboat, it needs to be able to operate forward (in transit) or aft (when doing industrial work).  So the controls move with the operator, and the “Cyber Chair” slides fore and aft within the bridge as well as swiveling.  The whole concept was completely overwhelming to me.”

Thanks to Mike and George.  All other photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s planning at least one more “seats of power” post, so if you have photos of a bridge/helm/wheelhouse seat, please send it along.

Oh, the mystery seat . . . was in a dockside gantry crane operator cabin.

 

This morning I was looking for something, I thought happened in spring 2008.  Alas, I had the date wrong, but this research led me to these photos, some of which I may have posted before, all taken between April 10 and 17 2008, i.e., a decade ago exactly.  Back then I’d go into work an hour or so early, and because I had not yet plugged into AIS on my phone–I had a flipper–it was catch as catch could. Revisiting these photos stunned me with how much specific equipment has changed.

Baltic Sea and Coral Sea have gone over to West Africa.  Maybe a gallivant there is in order.  I last left West Africa forty years ago!!.

Maryland is still in the area;  I caught a glimpse of her in Jamaica Bay last week as Liz Vinik, but not close enough for a photo showing anything but a speck.  Check out Birk’s site’s info on Vinik Marine Services.

Nathan E. Stewart came to an ignoble end.

Both K-Sea and Allied have been purchased by Kirby.  Petrel has gone to Philadelphia, where she’s working as Northstar Integrity. Below, she was pushing Sugar Express, up to the plant in Yonkers.

Crude oil tanker Wilana (now Kamari) arriving at dawn on a very calm slack water Arthur Kill was the high point of that week, especially because it was the first tanker I’d watched coming into Linden.  I’ll not forget how silent the process was.

On the starboard bow was Catherine Turecamo, now working in freshwater near the Great Lakes as John Marshall.

On her stern was Laura K Moran, now moved to another Moran base.  And, notice the Bayonne Bridge now longer has the geometry as shown below.

Any time I feel that stuff never changes, guess I should look through my archives.

All photos taken in mid-April 2008 by Will Van Dorp, who wonders if anyone out there read Future Shock by Alvin Toffler.  It was published almost a half century ago but I think he was on to something.

 

Notwithstanding all that . ..    sometimes the thought that a day is the first day in the rest of one’s life is superlatively vivid.    Enjoy my pics and maybe you’ll get this sense also.

Sunday afternoon, Zhen Hua 10 enters the Kills. Does anyone know if “Zhen Hua” means anything?  Note Manhattan and the tip of Bayonne to the left, and tug Brooklyn, Robbins Reef Light, and the boro of Brooklyn to the right.

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The new cranes arriving and the bridge their squeezing underneath are integrally related parts of the same story, as . . .

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… are the cranes and the dredging equipment in the background.  Note tug Specialist in the background

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Margaret Moran tends the port bow.

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Gramma Lee T Moran supplies the brakes and rudder.

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The ship completes its journey of thousands of miles.  Is it true that Zhen Hua 10 arrived here via Cape of Good Hope?

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On the same theme . .  here’s a handsome team of tugs, good paint all around.  Working on a tandem assignment?

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My thought when I read the name on the nearer tug was . . . this is historic . . . Crow‘s last ride;  the Bushey tug might also be in the last mile of its thousands and thousands in a half century of work.

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She’s being escorted in by Emily Ann . . .

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Crow and her sister Cheyenne DO have classic lines!

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Machines on shore were already staged . . . .

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while not far away a last spring seal lollygags on some warm rusty metal, once also a brand new machine.

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And on the other side of Staten Island rubble of a light indispensable a century ago adapts to a new life as a rookery.

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Many thanks to NYMedia Boat.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will be transiting himself soon.  Thursday I leave on a grand gallivant, and in early June–if all goes well– I start a new chapter working on Urger, that handsome young centenarian tug you see upper left at the top of the page.

It’s late Sunday evening, and Monday morning will come very early, so as a sneak preview to tomorrow’s post, a few photos of the transit of Zhen Hua 10 to Port Newark.  Moveable platform courtesy of NYMedia Boat, which gets a photographer in the right places.

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More tomorrow after work.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Eastbound and from left, it’s Sunny Williams, Sarah Ann, and Ellen McAllister.

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Around the same time, it’s a light Patrice McAllister eastbound.  Compare the April 2014 shot below with these April 2012 ones of her first arriving in the sixth boro after the tragic fire on Lake Ontario.

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After all the ice work Kimberly Poling has done the past few months, Sunday was a welcome sunny day, I’ll assume.

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It wasn’t until this tow turned away from head-one that I understood what I was looking at . . ..

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but closer in  . . . it was clearly Stephen Dann (I think this is her first appearance on this blog) towing

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crane barge Strong Island.

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Off Owl’s Head, it’s Pacific Reliance and Discovery Coast (I think) off to the west.

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Pacific Reliance appeared here about six weeks ago.

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Catherine Turecamo stands by near Gulf Pearl.

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Parting shot . . . following up on the opening shot of this post.

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All photos the past few days by Will Van Dorp.

I thought I had done a post called “pushing oil,” but I seem to have mis-remembered.  The closest I can find is here, and looking at this post, it’s clear to me how much I’ve learned since starting this blog.  Here’s another related one from last year.

Clearly . . . that’s not a tanker below.  Thanks to Ashley Hutto for this fine photo of Captain Zeke doing a job that might have been done by small tankers a few decades or less back.

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Capt. Log is one such small tankers, and her life doing what she does so well is winding down.

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Here two Moran tugs–Brendan and Catherine Turecamo, I think–push a tanker into a berth on the KVK.

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Davis Sea . . . once this would have been done by a tanker.

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Ditto Dace Reinauer.

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Thanks to Ashley for the top photo.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

It’s Margot, last included on this blog here.  Guess the location?

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And a former fleet mate of Frances, it’s  Catherine Turecamo . ..  with Gage Paul Thornton way in the background.

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Here’s a closer-up of Gage Paul with Robbins Light in the background.

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New York Central No. 13 . . . changing at a glacial pace and probably regressing, not progressing.   My last photo of this boat might be here.

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Here’s Robert leaving the sixth boro this morning with a tow that

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includes dredge McCaskill, which I previously featured here high and dry  and here from the inside.

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East Coast meets west coast this morning alongside Corossol.

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The newer Dean headed eastbound on the KVK and

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and finally . .  another configuration of Marjorie B. McAllister.

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All photos taken this week by Will Van Dorp.

Oh . . . Margot‘s location in the first photo is Tottenville NY, with Outerbridge Crossing in the background.

Here was the first time I used this title, which clearly needs to be used again.

Let me start here at 13:38.  Note from far to near, or black hull to black hull . . . Cartagena, Four Sky with Lee T Moran, Red Hook, and Genco Knight.

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Twin Tube slides through the opening between Bow Kiso and Genco Knight.

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Even the bow of Genco Knight is crowded as their vessel prepares to dock and resupply the salt depot.

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Kimberly Turecamo works the bulk carrier’s stern as Evening Star passes with B. No. 250.

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Add McAllister Girls in the foreground and Ellen McAllister in the distance against the blue hull, which will appear a bit later.

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McCrews heads westbound and Four Sky now seems to be doing the same.

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Are you out of breath yet?  Only 10 minutes has elapsed.

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Linehandler 1 cruises blithely through it, supremely self-assured.

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Cheyenne adds color.

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Another line handler boat scouts out the set up . . . as a new blue hull arrives from the west, as

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. .  . does Charles D. McAllister.

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Crew on the blue hull–Nord Observer–stows lines as they head for tropical heat, escorted

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by Catherine Turecamo although

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at the turn on the Con Hook range they meet Mare Pacific heading in with Joan Turecamo and Margaret  Moran.  At this point . . .

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14:12 . . .  the mergansers decided to hightail it . . . or at least follow their crests.  And I hadn’t even turned around yet to see the congestion on land behind me.

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All these photos in a very short time by Will Van Dorp.

My thanks to Brian DeForest and Atlantic Salt, whom Genco Knight was arriving to restock.

Here was a post about a dense traffic day as well as a busy day.

Maersk Wisconsin headed out,  . . .  my attention is on the figure between the tugboat and the ship.

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You know the unseen players on two vessels in this maneuver must be 100% focused here.

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The way is prepared and the pilot begins the final steps of egress as all eyes remain on him.

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Once he steps back onto Catherine Turecamo, the tug breaks to starboard, and

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the Maersk crew begin to retract the passageways as

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vessel heads to the next port and the next pilots.

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I took these fotos and assembled this draft on a cold morning back in March 2013.  Pilots must have one of the more potentially life-threatening jobs in the harbor.

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