You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Eric McAllister’ tag.

Here are previous posts, and yes, it’s twelve o’clock somewhere . . . which means POSTING Time.

What would be your guess for the nationality of the mariner on the tug?  How about the mariners on the ship?

I’ll let you ponder a clue that might be here.

It’s like spotting a unicorn to see a US-flagged tanker in the sixth boro.

She’s 2009 NASSCO built.

I can’t say much else about her, but it was good to see.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  Here’s a fact I stumbled on yesterday:  although there are ships and boats named for former presidents on the US, can you name one that’s namesake for two US presidents?  Answer is here.

Beyond Capt. Brian . . .

Stena Penguin prepares to exit the KVK for the Upper Bay and up to the Saint Lawrence.

Anchored in the Upper Bay, it’s Stenaweco Elegance and

Venus R. now both away south . . ..

Eric McAllister here passes Harbour First, and later

escorts in RHL Agilitas.

Meanwhile crude oil tanker Alpine Confidence, somewhat down by the bow, turns in the tide just inside the Narrows.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who always finds change in the sixth boro, whether it be every day or every decennial.

By the way, see Tugster Tower in the distance . . .  somewhere out there in the haze.

 

I missed Josephine Reinauer (actually I saw her but couldn’t get a clear shot)  when she visited town recently, but I did catch Jacksonville, the latest Vane machine in the harbor.

For some reason I expected her to look different, but it’s an Elizabeth Anne class tug, which’ll look a lot like most of the rest of the Vane fleet.

Eric and the other McAllister escort tugs have been quite busy recently.

Ernest Campbell has been here about a half year doing bunkering, I believe.

Trevor usually works as a dredge tender, focusing on the Jersey shore this fall.

Brooklyn was called Brooklyn Service when I first discovered the sixth born.

Daisy Mae is just over a year old.

Normandy came to the sixth born from Colombia a few years ago.

Rowan has been working in the sixth boro of late.

In fact, almost seven years ago, it was Rowan that brought Patrice McAllister into the boro after the tragic fire during her delivery from the Great Lakes to this salt water.  These days, Patrice is looking great.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has heard about but not yet seen Hunter D.

 

Faber Park aka the swimming pool has become one of my favorite places to watch the behemoths pass.The next set of photos I took in about 10 minutes.

I’m in awe of the skills involved . . . navigation and communication.

This is a tight turn.

x

Four tugboats–Ellen, Rowan, Capt. Brian, and Eric–keep it in the channel and the track such that two of these ships can negotiate the turn.

 

And they make it look routine.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Nineteen boxes wide!

And stacked higher behind the bridge than in front of it.

It was a windy day, and Alex did her part to ensure she rounded the bend.

Eric on the starboard bow was there if needed to thrust the bow within the channel.

And at the opposite stern, Capt. Brian A.  could do what was needed

to make this rounding of Bergen Point

just routine, as Maersk Shenzhen made a few more turns before setting a course across the Atlantic directly for Suez and points beyond.  I caught her in port earlier as Hyundai Pluto, sister of Jupiter.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose previous installments of this title all involved McAllister boats as well.

 

Evergreen Marine ships have a unique profile.  Ten of the 30 vessels in this L class have been built in Taiwan, including the one below, Ever Lovely. 

 

Meeting Ever Lovely were Alex and Eric McAllister.

 

 

Inside the Narrows, the docking pilot

came aboard from Alex.

 

As Lovely arrived, Legacy departed.

Only a few years ago, vessels of these dimensions would be the largest container ships calling in NYC.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Did you hear about Peak Pegasus, the vessel racing to get US soybeans into China before retaliatory 25% tariffs are slapped on?  More on Peak Pegasus at the end of this post.

Well, these two container ship had no need to hurry into the sixth boro, yet here’s something I’ve never seen before . . . two container ships entering the Narrows in quite close succession.

Obviously the passage accommodates all, but still . . . a new sight for me, the reason I return here again and again.

See QM2 in the distance to the right?  I caught her first arrival here 11 years ago.  Dawn was too late for me to catch it.  That ominous sky got me thinking . . . storm clouds.  Locally I was just concerned about getting spots on my lens.  But then I thought about the story of Peak Pegasus, the impending trade war.  I could see those as storm clouds, and shipping . . . this is a front line, like every seaport in the US.

Take the value of all the imported cargo on Maersk Buton and

add to it the value of whatever’s on OOCL Berlin . . . and every other ship entering a US port for the foreseeable future and add the product of that and  .25 . . . the sum’s rising.  Ditto  . . . whatever is on Bomar Caen–headed for Colombia–might just be less attractive if .25 gets added to the price of those goods.  Maybe Colombia is not affected.

I’m by no means an expert in much, and please educate me if I’m wrong, but these storm clouds seemed appropriate this morning.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp, who first read the name of the Maersk ship as butoh, which would have been much more interesting.

Peak Pegasus plowed at top speed to make port, but  . . . she failed.  More here.   Here’s a story from the same vessel from a few months back.

Rt Hon Paul E. Martin called here before a month over three years ago, that time carrying the same type of cargo.

I took these photos yesterday, and believe it or not, I felt only a few drops of rain.

The Martin is the second self-unloader to call in the sixth boro in three days, which must be some sort of a record.

Eric and Bruce did a magnificent job of spinning the bulker around.

Once spun around, foot by foot she was moved with precision to the dock.

 

To get this cargo here, Martin traveled three weeks and transited the Panama Canal.

 

Can anyone tell me the meaning of the “10H VOID” marking just below the name and CSL class of the freighter and the “VOID7” marking just above the water line?

And where is Morro Redondo, you ask?  It’s on the island of Cedros, a bit over 300 miles SSE of San Diego, CA.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Until an hour before posting, there were two Canadian self-unloaders in our harbor, which is truly remarkable.  Algoma Integrity, as of posting, is not even 10 nm outside the Narrows.

 

CMA CGM T. Roosevelt is not the only 1200′ ship calling here these days.  CMA CGM J. Adams has recently visited the harbor, as has NYK Wren, ninth of the NYK “bird” series, which arrived and departed in the hours too dark for photos.   There are several 1200′ OOCL vessels, including recently OOCL Chongqing.

If you need an image to show why assist tugs look triangular from this angle, this might be it.

 

 

Ten years ago, it would take two ships to move this number of containers.

It’s hard to keep up with new ULCS entering service.  OOCL Chongqing is rated at 13,208 teus; the newest vessels are already up to 21,000!

 

 

She recently departed Charleston and is headed for Suez and back to Asia through the Indian Ocean.

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Eric McAllister went out the Narrows to

meet her ship out beyond Swinburne.

 

It seems the gulls are excited by whatever chum follows in the wake, chum made from all those shad.

The shine on the hull suggested a fairly new ship, and

in fact, I’d never seen this one before,

Grande New York.

How grand.  She was completed at CSC Jinling Shipyard in late October 2017.  I don’t know if this was her first arrival in New York.  Sister ships are Grande Baltimora, already in service, and Grande Halifax . . . yet to be completed.

Here are previously posted other “Grande” Grimaldi vessels:  G Senegal,  G Marocco, and G Guinea, which came into the sixth boro early Monday and departed yesterday.

And here’s the rest of the title . . . as a way to show the varying weather.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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