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Evergreen Marine ships have a unique profile.  Ten of the 30 vessels in this L class have been built in Taiwan, including the one below, Ever Lovely. 

 

Meeting Ever Lovely were Alex and Eric McAllister.

 

 

Inside the Narrows, the docking pilot

came aboard from Alex.

 

As Lovely arrived, Legacy departed.

Only a few years ago, vessels of these dimensions would be the largest container ships calling in NYC.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Did you hear about Peak Pegasus, the vessel racing to get US soybeans into China before retaliatory 25% tariffs are slapped on?  More on Peak Pegasus at the end of this post.

Well, these two container ship had no need to hurry into the sixth boro, yet here’s something I’ve never seen before . . . two container ships entering the Narrows in quite close succession.

Obviously the passage accommodates all, but still . . . a new sight for me, the reason I return here again and again.

See QM2 in the distance to the right?  I caught her first arrival here 11 years ago.  Dawn was too late for me to catch it.  That ominous sky got me thinking . . . storm clouds.  Locally I was just concerned about getting spots on my lens.  But then I thought about the story of Peak Pegasus, the impending trade war.  I could see those as storm clouds, and shipping . . . this is a front line, like every seaport in the US.

Take the value of all the imported cargo on Maersk Buton and

add to it the value of whatever’s on OOCL Berlin . . . and every other ship entering a US port for the foreseeable future and add the product of that and  .25 . . . the sum’s rising.  Ditto  . . . whatever is on Bomar Caen–headed for Colombia–might just be less attractive if .25 gets added to the price of those goods.  Maybe Colombia is not affected.

I’m by no means an expert in much, and please educate me if I’m wrong, but these storm clouds seemed appropriate this morning.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp, who first read the name of the Maersk ship as butoh, which would have been much more interesting.

Peak Pegasus plowed at top speed to make port, but  . . . she failed.  More here.   Here’s a story from the same vessel from a few months back.

Rt Hon Paul E. Martin called here before a month over three years ago, that time carrying the same type of cargo.

I took these photos yesterday, and believe it or not, I felt only a few drops of rain.

The Martin is the second self-unloader to call in the sixth boro in three days, which must be some sort of a record.

Eric and Bruce did a magnificent job of spinning the bulker around.

Once spun around, foot by foot she was moved with precision to the dock.

 

To get this cargo here, Martin traveled three weeks and transited the Panama Canal.

 

Can anyone tell me the meaning of the “10H VOID” marking just below the name and CSL class of the freighter and the “VOID7” marking just above the water line?

And where is Morro Redondo, you ask?  It’s on the island of Cedros, a bit over 300 miles SSE of San Diego, CA.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Until an hour before posting, there were two Canadian self-unloaders in our harbor, which is truly remarkable.  Algoma Integrity, as of posting, is not even 10 nm outside the Narrows.

 

CMA CGM T. Roosevelt is not the only 1200′ ship calling here these days.  CMA CGM J. Adams has recently visited the harbor, as has NYK Wren, ninth of the NYK “bird” series, which arrived and departed in the hours too dark for photos.   There are several 1200′ OOCL vessels, including recently OOCL Chongqing.

If you need an image to show why assist tugs look triangular from this angle, this might be it.

 

 

Ten years ago, it would take two ships to move this number of containers.

It’s hard to keep up with new ULCS entering service.  OOCL Chongqing is rated at 13,208 teus; the newest vessels are already up to 21,000!

 

 

She recently departed Charleston and is headed for Suez and back to Asia through the Indian Ocean.

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Eric McAllister went out the Narrows to

meet her ship out beyond Swinburne.

 

It seems the gulls are excited by whatever chum follows in the wake, chum made from all those shad.

The shine on the hull suggested a fairly new ship, and

in fact, I’d never seen this one before,

Grande New York.

How grand.  She was completed at CSC Jinling Shipyard in late October 2017.  I don’t know if this was her first arrival in New York.  Sister ships are Grande Baltimora, already in service, and Grande Halifax . . . yet to be completed.

Here are previously posted other “Grande” Grimaldi vessels:  G Senegal,  G Marocco, and G Guinea, which came into the sixth boro early Monday and departed yesterday.

And here’s the rest of the title . . . as a way to show the varying weather.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s a stranger in the harbor . . . OSG Courageous.  Winter does seem like the time to see the larger units moving oil products. Crowley’s 16,000 hp Legend is in the AK as of this writing.  If anyone snaps a photo, I’d love to see it.   Back in winter 2012, I posted photos of Legend here still on the hard as a new build.

OSG Courageous, 8000 hp,  is married to this 200,000 barrel barge OSG-244.   Click here for my first view of an even larger OSG tug, Vision, 12,000 hp.

Lincoln Sea was the largest tug I’d ever seen back 10 years when we crossed paths near Mariner’s Harbor.

This was her arrival from somewhere in New England yesterday.

At the same moment, Dylan Cooper was lightering a tanker I’d seen before as

Navig8 Stealth II, now intriguingly renamed Aquadisiac.

Eric McAllister assisted Glorious Leader . . .,

which these days sounds like it refers to a dictator.

To close, the venerable Frances moves cold stone through cold water,

but it’s winter.  Crank up the heat and put on some extra layers.  Click here and scroll to see photos of Frances I took in 2010 when she still had the Turecamo wood grained colors.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

YM Express backs into the Rose Bowl after leaving Howland Hook, with some assistance seen at the starboard stern quarter.

Once rotated toward the east, she passes Eric McAllister.

Note that whereas English is a strictly left to right writing system, Chinese is not.

Ellen assists  . . .

 

 

This is my first time to notice the “beware of the propeller” sign in Chinese.  I take it the rightmost character means propeller, but I could be wrong about that.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose computer translates English to Chinese characters as below, speaks and writes/reads no Chinese, Mandarin or otherwise.

.

. . . a sixth boro set on a day that was predicted to bring rain.  When I first saw the photo below, I thought the McAllister tug was assisting a DonJon unit?

A few seconds later it was clear that Alex was overtaking the slower Paul Andrew.

 

Dr. Milton Waner–named for a plastic surgeon!!— here travels light.  Harley does have this focus on medicine in their recent namings, like Fight ALS and One Cure.  That’s Durham in the distance with the spud barge.

 

Around the same time, Eric McAllister, Thomas D. Witte, and James E. Brown appear, headed for the Kills.

 

Mr Russell comes out of the Kills.  And can you name the Vane tug in the distance?

Philadelphia!

It must be the newest Vane tug in the sixth boro, and I don’t know if she’s even more recent than Capt. Brian A. McAllister. For all I know, this could be her first week in town….  And from a full decade ago, here’s the previous Philadelphia in town, the ITB Philly.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s what’s on the surface and

here’s a bigger picture.  That trio in the sky following Bruce A McAllister tails us as well!

Big Jake once

trafficked the sixth boro as Juliet Reinauer.

Over at the Brooklyn passenger terminal, Jonathan C waits,

canvas on the fenders, to assist Crown Princess out.

And given my scarceness in the sixth boro, the only image I have to date of the new Capt. Brian A. McAllister has the tug concealed by Alex and Eric.

And then out on the Sound, it’s John P Wronowski and escort,

headed for the barn.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who recently stumbled onto an interesting blog, now added to my blogroll under a seamsters.org  Damn autocorrect . . . I really typed aa seasisters.org          the “aa” being there to keep this near the top of my links.

 

The top photo here comes from Brian Thigpen.  Last Monday, the first 13000 teu container ship–OOCL Berlin— entered port, and I missed it.  Bravo to Brian for photographing it.  I suspect soon the 14000 teu and then subsequent records will be set. Escort visible here is Eric McAllister, I think.

With larger ships, escort procedures seem to be changing also, like tugs coming in sets of three and meeting the vessel outside the VZ Bridge.  Just a few years ago, nothing of the the size of Northern Justice–8400 teu–was calling here.

 

I really should get more photos of the ships passing through the sixth boro and heading anywhere from Yonkers to Albany.  Here’s Western Aida along the cliffs of the UWS, 

leaving the Palisades to port once under the GW.

Here’s Spottail westbound on the KVK, assisted by Ellen McAllister and  Bruce A. McAllister,  and soon to pass

Stolt Pride, 2016, showing a new look for Stolt.

Thanks again to Brian Thigpen for use of his photo.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

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