You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Mary Alice’ tag.

Last year I called it the same but without a date.  See here . .    here . . .  and here for all the rest.

We’ll start and end with Dylan Cooper.  Is anyone shocked by this tow tube behind the small boat?

Mary Alice returns with a dredge spoils scow.

Bear?

Durham and rebar?

Remnants of the TZ Bridge. . .

and “chewing” hard on other remnants.

Stony Point Light . . .

Tug Kristin Poling heads for Jones Point, and

Dylan Cooper moves toward the tanks in Newburgh.

All photos on Monday by Will Van Dorp, and this was Manhattan to Newburgh.

By the way, did anyone get good photos of Triton, the biggest of the big ULCVs to call in the sixth boro so far?  She was coming under the Bayonne Bridge as first light was breaking.  More on that ULCV at the end of this post.

Let me start with two photos I took in Quebec City, over two years ago.

What caught my attention was the Tanzania registry.

Earlier this week I caught the “rest of the story” on this ship while reading the CBC online.  Click on the photo below of the captain to learn why this ship has not moved in over two years, a crew not shanghai’d but rather quebec’d or rather bahamian’d or most accurately, D & D maritime’d….

Now for some random ship traffic in the sixth boro, which no doubt has its own untold stories, how about this long glance at NYK Falcon, fleet mate of ONE Stork and one of the big birds of the harbor.

STI Leblon, a Brazilian reference,  heads out with an assist from Miriam Moran.  Here are many more STI tankers.

Genco Avra gets a partial load over in Greenville.

Nordmaple heads for sea.

Beauforte heads in, as does

Ems Trader.  Ems is a river reference, not an abbreviation.  Mary Turecamo is off her stern.

Did anyone get close-ups of Triton this morning?  I’d love to see them;  meanwhile, I’m hoping to catch her on the way out to sea, unless she leaves in the wee dark hours.  Port of Baltimore has made a big deal about this record-breaking vessel, as did the Panama Canal folks.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

OK, I know today is blue skies and clear air, but yesterday I stood in the rain at the Narrows waiting for an exotic vessel that I knew wouldn’t arrive for a while.  But around virtual sunrise . . . virtual because the sun never rose or set all day . . . this was in the offing.

Since Mary Alice was involved, I had assumed it would be a floating crane or a dump scow.  Mary Alice is to the right, light blue, DonJon blue.   But along with her are Normandy, Treasure Coast, and Sapphire Coast.

By this time, I’d put together that I’d learned that the “dead ship” that had arrived about two weeks earlier was the first of two coming to GMD Brooklyn.  They were moving “slow bell,” which was fine by me, because the vessel I’d come out to see was still . . . at sea.

Some changing-up took place in the alongside-tow before they came through the Narrows.

I mastered holding an umbrella while framing the shots;  the secret was repurposing a garbage can against the railing, which worked because there was drizzle but no wind.

 

Once I got the photos home, as so often happens,

I could make out the “riding crew” on the dead ship.  Previous dead ship posts on tugster can be found here.

Sapphire Coast (4860 hp) by now has moved to the apparent port side.

Normandy brings 1900 hp and Mary Alice . . . 3000.

Here’s more riding crew.

Scan through here to find context for these vessels . . . C4-S-58a . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who thinks some vessels look just right on rainy days, better than on sunny days.

Behold the Atlantics  . . . being A Salvor with the dump scow Witte 4003  and

A Enterprise . . . with the Chesapeake 1000. It’s delightful to see them now as twins, which they are, but hadn’t appeared to be.  Before we move to the next pictures, though, what are the “poles” beyond the dump scow?

The ridge is the highlands of Monmouth County above with West Bank Light below.

Mary Alice and Atlantic Salvor have been shuttling quite a few dump scows the past few weeks, it seems.

 

Caitlin Ann–which I first saw as Vivian L. Roehrig and later as Caribbean Sea— followed Enterprise in.

Different day, different towing arrangement . . . Atlantic Salvor returns with a light dump scow Weeks 258.

Caitlin Ann heads under the Bayonne Bridge, past its dismantled piers.

And the “poles” belong to  L/B Vision coming into the harbor with

her 95′ spindly spuds.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Ivory Coast

Christian Reinauer

Ross Sea

C. Angelo

Scott Turecamo, New Hampshire, and Brendan Turecamo

Curtis and RTC 82

Mary Alice and Nan Lin Wan

Pearl Coast and Cement Transporter 1801

MSC Maureen, Jonathan C. Moran, and Kirby Moran

All photos taken in April 2018 by Will Van Dorp.

 

Carl Sandburg said:  “The fog comes  . ..  on little cat feet.

It sits looking  . . . over harbor and city . . . on silent haunches

And then moves on.”

 

My unrehearsed version is :  “The old cat once . .  . patrolled the wharf
Now it sits over the sunlight . . . and sheds on the riverbanks
masking the distances.”

What I really mean is that taking photos on limited visibility day like yesterday benefits from heightened foreground details in comparison.
Jennifer Turecamo heads out to Gravesend Bay along with the USCG patrol vessel.

A tanker arrives with a name

that’s ironic on a few levels .  .

Meagan Ann hauls Witte 4002 out to dump and

Mary Alice returns Witte 4004 from HARS before Meagan Ann  returns.

And Barney Turecamo comes into port a bit while the barge is monitored by Jennifer.

To finish, here’s another shot of Combi Dock 1 arriving from China with lots of sea miles logged….

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Genesis Energy likely has more boats on inland waters than offshore.  I saw the first two boats in today’s post first when they had Hornbeck livery.

dscf2557

Genesis Victory used to be Huron Service  (and further regression is found at that link) and

dscf2559-1

Genesis Liberty used to be

dscf2560

Liberty Service, and here’s more regressions on both.

dscf2563

A lot of boats in the harbor have worn other names previously.  It’s true of Mary Alice.  

dscf2569

Here’s her history, thanks to Birk’s gold mine site.

dscf2572

Jonathan C, however, is brand spanking new, having been christened less than a year ago.  But starting from week one, maintenance needs doing.

dscf2579

 

dscf2608

Ditto Janet D, she’s less than two years old.

dscf2676

 

dscf2678

And here is Labrador Sea as I saw her last week, but when I first photographed her she looked

dscf2751

like this. And although I have none of my own photos, here’s what I first saw.

dscf2752

I hope you enjoyed this look backwards.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

If you depart at 0400, there’s not much to photograph.  Light beckoned as we approached Newburgh/Beacon.

gl1

I saw Mt. Beacon as I never had before;

gl2

ditto Storm King in sunrise that even dappled

gl3

the wave tops.

gl4

Once around Gee Point, we saw the statue (to the left on the ridge)

gl5

of Kościuszko’s, fortifier of West Point.

gl6

Once south of the Bear Mountain Bridge, passengers traveled upstream

gl7

for seasonal seesighting.

gl8

Scrap was sought.

gl99

Sloops sailed and

gl9

work boats waited their time.

gl10

More statues sighted, and

gl11

vessels waited their time.

gl12

 

gl13

And we had arrived at a place where at least two boros approached each other.

gl14

Will Van Dorp, who took these photos, is back in the boros for a while.

Here was 4.  Pairings suggest to me springtime, and I certainly am ready for that to happen.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here a blindingly cold blue Meagan Ann departs the Kills with a team of scows

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Cape Sally and Cape Heane.  Are there really capes by these names?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

From back in January . . . it’s Chesapeake 1000 towed into the Kills by

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Mary Alice and tailed by

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Emily Ann.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Non-matching but a pair nonetheless here is Paul Andrew and Liberty V.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And since this post seems to be sticking to the color blue, here’s a pair I took a photo of midMay last year… Emily Ann driving Crow‘s last ride.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And although red . . . Little Bear and bigger sister Bear . . . has anyone recently gotten a photo of them you could share here?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

To end on a blue note . . . does anyone ave photos of Atlantic Salvor in its current Caribbean context?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

Storm Juno was all hyperbole in the five boros . . . not as  harsh as  in eastern Long Island and southern New England, but it was cold the day after.  Nevertheless, Mary Alice and Cheyenne were hard at work,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

as was Mister Jim.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The same is true for Barbara McAllister and 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Charles D.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Buchanan 1 was at work.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The government boats were out like Liberty V and

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Driftmaster.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Of course, cold means demand for fuel . .  and Matthew Tibbetts was moving it , as

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

was Crystal Cutler.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Joyce D. Brown was moving the railroad and

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Treasure Coast had a barge astern headed south. Anyone know what cargo was/will be in the barge?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who went out to see the sights after the storm.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,307 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Recent Comments

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

November 2019
M T W T F S S
« Oct    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930