You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Mary Alice’ tag.

I’ve seen unusual tows before 2019, but it was only then that I started counting.  I’ll add links to previous unusual tows at the end of this post.  So where’s the tow?

It’s (l to r) Mary Alice, Laura Maersk, and Emily Ann, all behind Atlantic Enterprise.

The story is simple if unfortunate . . .

You’ve no doubt experienced the same with your car, or boat . . .  Something happens, and you need a tow.  This one started a few days ago, as you can read in the link in the previous sentence.  Here‘s more detail.

Fire Fighter II met the tow as it approached the Narrows.

Mary Alice had starboard,

Emily Ann had port.

The trio delivered the container ship to Stapleton.  Moran tugs took the ship from there to the container docks.

Today’s weather was fabulous and seas flat, not so a few days ago.

All photos, WVD.

Some previous unusual tows might be these of Wavertree, Peking, Lehigh Valley 79, Dorothy McAllister and mystery ship, the future OHP, Thorco Hilde, SS Columbia, and I could go on . . .  Maybe I need to add some appropriate tags.

 

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How’s this as an unusual perspective, East Coast coming through the Narrows and under the VZ Bridge, barely visible at top of photo,  with a sugar barge, not sure which one. I believe that’s a Sandy Hook antenna and West Bank Romer Shoal Light off starboard.

Kimberly Poling heads into the Kills past Robbins Reef Light.

James William has been moving garbage containers these days.

The intriguingly named Iron Wolf passes the Brooklyn Army Terminal.

Mary Alice moves Columbia New York.

A few hundred yards ahead of Iron Wolf is Sea Fox.

Andrea departs the Kills to pick up a fuel barge.

Mary H returns from a run with barge Patriot.

And finally, Fox3 heads southbound;  that’s the southern tip of Manhattan behind her.

All photos, WVD.

Here are previous installments, the last of which I did in 2011.

The idea here is just photos.  For identification, there’s text on the images and in the tags.

Morning light enhances the mostly thorough coating of steel with bright paint colors.

 

 

 

 

Next stop Belford for Midnight.  Too bad I don’t live closer to the Seafood Co-op there.

All photos by Will Van Dorp . . .

Note about ongoing voting below.  Also, previous “cranes” posts can be found here.

I’ve long included photos of Chesapeake 1000 but never devoted a post to it.  These posts here and here from seven years ago are my favorites, largely because my camera and I just happened onto the lift while prowling at night, not a common time for me to be out.  Is it possible that was already seven years that that WTC antenna went up?!!

So yesterday morning, I left home early for a midmorning rendezvous, and this is what I saw.

Mary Alice handed the Chesapeake 1000 off to Thomas,

who took the crane under the VZ Bridge and

toward the cliffs of the Upper Bay, including the WTC with the antenna it assisted the lift for  . . . seven years ago.

 

As is always the case, there’s a lot going on in the sixth boro.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who reminds you that the polling for my 2020 calendar pages is ongoing.  You can see all the choices in these posts;  ultimately you and I will choose one photo for each monthly calendar page.  Polling ends on December 21, when I send the order in.  Again, to vote, just put the letter for each month in the comments or send it in an email to me.  Moreover, for the December page, I’m soliciting photos from you;  rules here.

“Here are guidelines:  a qualified photo for polling must involve a vessel and a non-verbal detail(s) identifying it as having been taken in a December.  I hope that’s ambiguous enough to keep it interesting.  Whoever sends in the chosen photo . . . to be determined no later than December 21, also gets a photo credit and a free calendar.  Another option is for me to choose a December photo from a previous year.  See what I’ve done in the previous 13 Decembers in the archives;  the location near the bottom of the leftside navigation bar allows you to select any month going back to November 2006.”

Thanks to all of you who have already voted.

 

Mary Alice with Witte 1407

 

Brendan Turecamo with container barge New Jersey

Sarah Ann with SMM 105

 

A light Stephen B passing the Lady

Caitlin Ann with SMM 211 and a light Emily Ann

 

Galveston with Petrochem Producer and a surveillance bird

And–to repost a photo from April 2018–guess where Iron Salvor is today . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose curt post today are dictated by a tank low on verbiage today because my reserves are being used on other projects .  ..

Iron Salvor, the one above, is currently in Malta, that English-speaking island in the Med!!

Last year I called it the same but without a date.  See here . .    here . . .  and here for all the rest.

We’ll start and end with Dylan Cooper.  Is anyone shocked by this tow tube behind the small boat?

Mary Alice returns with a dredge spoils scow.

Bear?

Durham and rebar?

Remnants of the TZ Bridge. . .

and “chewing” hard on other remnants.

Stony Point Light . . .

Tug Kristin Poling heads for Jones Point, and

Dylan Cooper moves toward the tanks in Newburgh.

All photos on Monday by Will Van Dorp, and this was Manhattan to Newburgh.

By the way, did anyone get good photos of Triton, the biggest of the big ULCVs to call in the sixth boro so far?  She was coming under the Bayonne Bridge as first light was breaking.  More on that ULCV at the end of this post.

Let me start with two photos I took in Quebec City, over two years ago.

What caught my attention was the Tanzania registry.

Earlier this week I caught the “rest of the story” on this ship while reading the CBC online.  Click on the photo below of the captain to learn why this ship has not moved in over two years, a crew not shanghai’d but rather quebec’d or rather bahamian’d or most accurately, D & D maritime’d….

Now for some random ship traffic in the sixth boro, which no doubt has its own untold stories, how about this long glance at NYK Falcon, fleet mate of ONE Stork and one of the big birds of the harbor.

STI Leblon, a Brazilian reference,  heads out with an assist from Miriam Moran.  Here are many more STI tankers.

Genco Avra gets a partial load over in Greenville.

Nordmaple heads for sea.

Beauforte heads in, as does

Ems Trader.  Ems is a river reference, not an abbreviation.  Mary Turecamo is off her stern.

Did anyone get close-ups of Triton this morning?  I’d love to see them;  meanwhile, I’m hoping to catch her on the way out to sea, unless she leaves in the wee dark hours.  Port of Baltimore has made a big deal about this record-breaking vessel, as did the Panama Canal folks.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

OK, I know today is blue skies and clear air, but yesterday I stood in the rain at the Narrows waiting for an exotic vessel that I knew wouldn’t arrive for a while.  But around virtual sunrise . . . virtual because the sun never rose or set all day . . . this was in the offing.

Since Mary Alice was involved, I had assumed it would be a floating crane or a dump scow.  Mary Alice is to the right, light blue, DonJon blue.   But along with her are Normandy, Treasure Coast, and Sapphire Coast.

By this time, I’d put together that I’d learned that the “dead ship” that had arrived about two weeks earlier was the first of two coming to GMD Brooklyn.  They were moving “slow bell,” which was fine by me, because the vessel I’d come out to see was still . . . at sea.

Some changing-up took place in the alongside-tow before they came through the Narrows.

I mastered holding an umbrella while framing the shots;  the secret was repurposing a garbage can against the railing, which worked because there was drizzle but no wind.

 

Once I got the photos home, as so often happens,

I could make out the “riding crew” on the dead ship.  Previous dead ship posts on tugster can be found here.

Sapphire Coast (4860 hp) by now has moved to the apparent port side.

Normandy brings 1900 hp and Mary Alice . . . 3000.

Here’s more riding crew.

Scan through here to find context for these vessels . . . C4-S-58a . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who thinks some vessels look just right on rainy days, better than on sunny days.

Behold the Atlantics  . . . being A Salvor with the dump scow Witte 4003  and

A Enterprise . . . with the Chesapeake 1000. It’s delightful to see them now as twins, which they are, but hadn’t appeared to be.  Before we move to the next pictures, though, what are the “poles” beyond the dump scow?

The ridge is the highlands of Monmouth County above with West Bank Light below.

Mary Alice and Atlantic Salvor have been shuttling quite a few dump scows the past few weeks, it seems.

 

Caitlin Ann–which I first saw as Vivian L. Roehrig and later as Caribbean Sea— followed Enterprise in.

Different day, different towing arrangement . . . Atlantic Salvor returns with a light dump scow Weeks 258.

Caitlin Ann heads under the Bayonne Bridge, past its dismantled piers.

And the “poles” belong to  L/B Vision coming into the harbor with

her 95′ spindly spuds.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Ivory Coast

Christian Reinauer

Ross Sea

C. Angelo

Scott Turecamo, New Hampshire, and Brendan Turecamo

Curtis and RTC 82

Mary Alice and Nan Lin Wan

Pearl Coast and Cement Transporter 1801

MSC Maureen, Jonathan C. Moran, and Kirby Moran

All photos taken in April 2018 by Will Van Dorp.

 

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