You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Mary Alice’ tag.

Although some companies do most of the ship assist work in the sixth boro, others do some as well, as in here.

Still I was mildly surprised when I saw Mary Alice assisting Silver Ray the other day. 

Note the docking pilot on the starboard bridge wing of the tanker, radio communicating with the tug.

The near winter sunrise made a doppelgänger for the tug.

Job complete, Mary Alice heads for the next job, shrunk by the bow of the id outbound containership.

Is it just me, but has “silver” become a popular name in the harbor?

Happy December, stay healthy, and . . all photos, WVD.

Here are previous iterations, just to change things up.  Non-random here means I took these over a few weeks, which should be obvious as you look through the photos.

Atlantic Enterprise . .  . she’s big at 136′ x 40′.  Over the past few years, she has appeared here.  Before that, she was in the sixth boro but much less active as Barents Sea. She had different names before Barents going back to 1976.

Although slightly older than Atlantic Salvor, the two boats appear to be mostly similar. An Atlantic Salvor tow I’ll always remember relates to the WTC antenna here.

Some companies have a crew boat.  Behold Matthew Scott, a 1968 Gulf Craft 65′ x 16′.

When I first saw Caitlin Ann, she was called Vivian L. Roehrig.

The 79′ x 24′ tug keeps busy.

Hidden behind this barge,

it’s Sarah Ann, who i first knew as June K

I did a post on Brian Nicholas some years back.  I don’t recall ever seeing her as Banda Sea, but in this post from June 2009, that name was still showing . . . .

My favorite photo of Paul Andrew over the years

is this one, showing the 64′ x 23′ tugboat getting transferred, so to speak.

Mary Alice is one of the larger DonJon boats, at 92′ x 27′.

We’ll end with another shot of Atlantic Enterprise, distinguishable from Salvor   (my photo during the tugboat race September 5, 2010)

by that fire monitor.

Other DonJon boats– Meagan Ann, Emily Ann, Rebecca Ann, Thomas D., who else  did I miss–I’ve not seen so far in fall 2020.

All photos, WVD.

It’s the end of another month, and maybe because everything’s been so bleak of late, let’s just admire and enjoy the complexity of the sixth boro.

Diverse people work here on diverse missions.

Places like NY Harbor School and M.A. S. T. as well as SUNY Maritime College and King’s Point MMA are here.

On foggy days a narrow navigation channel gives the illusion of being as expansive as the ocean.

Keeping it as ideal a place as possible is the mission of many people and much infrastructure, seen and unseen.

Professionals pass through the sixth boro without ever technically entering the space, both a boon and a bane to all involved,

and their safe passage is ensured by the named and the nameless.

Work and recreation can happen in the same space because of

professionalism.  If you have a lot of time, you can binge watch these videos by a pro who works the sixth boro and beyond.  Now, when I hear his voice on VHF, it’s familiar.  There are books as well.

The universal language of gesture is powerdful.

The sixth boro has at least as much specialized equipment as the other five boros combined;  another way to put it, the specialized equipment of the sixth boro enable the other boros to perform.

And if the land boros have spirit, don’t imagine the sixth boro  lacks anything.

Photos and sentiments, WVD.

Tony Acabono wrote me that he was confused, although maybe he was not.

As this approached and passed by, I was briefly confounded.

The shape reminded me immediately of a tidal power installation in the East River, which I’d written about here 12 years ago.

The three nodes of the structure on the barge are marked A, B, and  . . . as you see . . . C.

I got out ahead of it.  The main tug here is Harry McNeal, and alongside is Miss Julia.  I’m not sure who owns Miss Julia.

A tidal strait, which the East River technically is, with tides in first one and then another direction, will spin these turbines and generate electricity.  Winds may be variable and intermittent, but the tides never cease.

Verdant Power is the clue will get you much more info.  

The three turbines/blades are fitted into a triangular structure, a TriFrame.  It will be submerged in the East River as part of RITE, Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy project, as yet a pre-commercial operation.  Materials and design are being tested.

And finally, from the Tideland Institute, Julia, Harry, and the turbines eastbound, like some low-flying albino birds,  in the Buttermilk.

  Read gCaptain’s take here.

And how would you imagine the Tri-Frame got lowered to the bottom? 

Columbia specializes in lowering and raising.

This post reminds me of Whatzit 36 . . . from three and a half years ago.

Thanks to Tony, Tideland, and AC.  Photos not credited to others by WVD, who’s repeatedly astonished by the sixth boro surprises and complexity. 

I’ve seen unusual tows before 2019, but it was only then that I started counting.  I’ll add links to previous unusual tows at the end of this post.  So where’s the tow?

It’s (l to r) Mary Alice, Laura Maersk, and Emily Ann, all behind Atlantic Enterprise.

The story is simple if unfortunate . . .

You’ve no doubt experienced the same with your car, or boat . . .  Something happens, and you need a tow.  This one started a few days ago, as you can read in the link in the previous sentence.  Here‘s more detail.

Fire Fighter II met the tow as it approached the Narrows.

Mary Alice had starboard,

Emily Ann had port.

The trio delivered the container ship to Stapleton.  Moran tugs took the ship from there to the container docks.

Today’s weather was fabulous and seas flat, not so a few days ago.

All photos, WVD.

Some previous unusual tows might be these of Wavertree, Peking, Lehigh Valley 79, Dorothy McAllister and mystery ship, the future OHP, Thorco Hilde, SS Columbia, and I could go on . . .  Maybe I need to add some appropriate tags.

 

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How’s this as an unusual perspective, East Coast coming through the Narrows and under the VZ Bridge, barely visible at top of photo,  with a sugar barge, not sure which one. I believe that’s a Sandy Hook antenna and West Bank Romer Shoal Light off starboard.

Kimberly Poling heads into the Kills past Robbins Reef Light.

James William has been moving garbage containers these days.

The intriguingly named Iron Wolf passes the Brooklyn Army Terminal.

Mary Alice moves Columbia New York.

A few hundred yards ahead of Iron Wolf is Sea Fox.

Andrea departs the Kills to pick up a fuel barge.

Mary H returns from a run with barge Patriot.

And finally, Fox3 heads southbound;  that’s the southern tip of Manhattan behind her.

All photos, WVD.

Here are previous installments, the last of which I did in 2011.

The idea here is just photos.  For identification, there’s text on the images and in the tags.

Morning light enhances the mostly thorough coating of steel with bright paint colors.

 

 

 

 

Next stop Belford for Midnight.  Too bad I don’t live closer to the Seafood Co-op there.

All photos by Will Van Dorp . . .

Note about ongoing voting below.  Also, previous “cranes” posts can be found here.

I’ve long included photos of Chesapeake 1000 but never devoted a post to it.  These posts here and here from seven years ago are my favorites, largely because my camera and I just happened onto the lift while prowling at night, not a common time for me to be out.  Is it possible that was already seven years that that WTC antenna went up?!!

So yesterday morning, I left home early for a midmorning rendezvous, and this is what I saw.

Mary Alice handed the Chesapeake 1000 off to Thomas,

who took the crane under the VZ Bridge and

toward the cliffs of the Upper Bay, including the WTC with the antenna it assisted the lift for  . . . seven years ago.

 

As is always the case, there’s a lot going on in the sixth boro.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who reminds you that the polling for my 2020 calendar pages is ongoing.  You can see all the choices in these posts;  ultimately you and I will choose one photo for each monthly calendar page.  Polling ends on December 21, when I send the order in.  Again, to vote, just put the letter for each month in the comments or send it in an email to me.  Moreover, for the December page, I’m soliciting photos from you;  rules here.

“Here are guidelines:  a qualified photo for polling must involve a vessel and a non-verbal detail(s) identifying it as having been taken in a December.  I hope that’s ambiguous enough to keep it interesting.  Whoever sends in the chosen photo . . . to be determined no later than December 21, also gets a photo credit and a free calendar.  Another option is for me to choose a December photo from a previous year.  See what I’ve done in the previous 13 Decembers in the archives;  the location near the bottom of the leftside navigation bar allows you to select any month going back to November 2006.”

Thanks to all of you who have already voted.

 

Mary Alice with Witte 1407

 

Brendan Turecamo with container barge New Jersey

Sarah Ann with SMM 105

 

A light Stephen B passing the Lady

Caitlin Ann with SMM 211 and a light Emily Ann

 

Galveston with Petrochem Producer and a surveillance bird

And–to repost a photo from April 2018–guess where Iron Salvor is today . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose curt post today are dictated by a tank low on verbiage today because my reserves are being used on other projects .  ..

Iron Salvor, the one above, is currently in Malta, that English-speaking island in the Med!!

Last year I called it the same but without a date.  See here . .    here . . .  and here for all the rest.

We’ll start and end with Dylan Cooper.  Is anyone shocked by this tow tube behind the small boat?

Mary Alice returns with a dredge spoils scow.

Bear?

Durham and rebar?

Remnants of the TZ Bridge. . .

and “chewing” hard on other remnants.

Stony Point Light . . .

Tug Kristin Poling heads for Jones Point, and

Dylan Cooper moves toward the tanks in Newburgh.

All photos on Monday by Will Van Dorp, and this was Manhattan to Newburgh.

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