You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Thomas J. Brown’ tag.

Followingup from yesterday and “…maybe it’s time for new permutations of truckster, teamster, bikester, autoster, planester, hutster, hikester, storyster, . . . ” let me say you’ve sent in some great ideas which I’ll follow up on in the next few days.

For now, let’s glance back 10 years to April 2010.  Any idea what this is all about?

Indeed, it was the arrival of 343Here‘s the post I did on that event.

A perennial harbor towing star is the Thomas J. BrownHere‘s the post with these now reposted photos.  What’s amazing to me here is the fact that two scows are being towed on a single hawser attached front starboard side of the lead barge.

Maybe there’s a term for this, other than brilliant?

Currently a tug operates through the harbor with the name Curtis Reinauer. Actually it’s the third boat with that name.  The one depicted below, 1979, the second iteration, is now in West African waters.  The original Curtis was reefed, although I haven’t located where.

APL Japan, with its port of registry as Oakland CA, was built in 1995;  since she appears not to have moved in some months from its anchorage in Gulf of Khambhat, I’m guessing she’s scrapped, although I can’t find evidence of that.

I count 15 containers across on the stern.

And finally, Steve Irwin, the Sea Shepherd boat, was in town in April 2010.  It has since been retired, was slated to be scrapped, but then saved as a museumship and is currently in Williamstown, Victoria in Australia.

The post I did on Irwin back then did not include the photo below, and

although I included the photo below, I did not comment on the ports of registry given, Rotterdam AND Kahnawake.  Now that I recognize what that is, I’m wondering about that relationship.  how many other vessels are Kahnawake registered?  Here‘s part of the story.

All photos here, WVD, taken in April 2010.

Stay healthy.

Following on yesterday’s comparison . . . two more tugboats, both active but with entirely different missions . . . I offer for your perusal, key word . . . perusal.

Thomas J. Brown, built 1962 and 60’x 19′ with hull depth of 8′, has a single CAT generating 1000 hp.

Ava M McAllister, christened in 2019 and 100′ x 40′ with a hull depth of 22′, has twin CAT mains generating 6770 hp.

The comparison is ludicrous from a performance perspective;  as I said before, they have entirely different missions.  Some comparisons here would make as little sense as pitting a pro stock race car against a top fuel machine . . .  but those are both drag strip cars.  Here’s another . . . compare a Grand National hydroplane with a Jersey Speed Skiff; they’re both race boats and not landing craft, both well-maintained and precision built for speed within defined parameters.  Likewise, above you’re looking at two tugboats, both of which are working boats in the sixth boro.

All photos, WVD, who’s learned the joys of hand washing.

Here’s another interesting comparison and why I said perusal:  Peru, South America with Peru, Indiana, North America with all the other Perus in the US.

 

 

Here are previous installments, the last of which I did in 2011.

The idea here is just photos.  For identification, there’s text on the images and in the tags.

Morning light enhances the mostly thorough coating of steel with bright paint colors.

 

 

 

 

Next stop Belford for Midnight.  Too bad I don’t live closer to the Seafood Co-op there.

All photos by Will Van Dorp . . .

Today it’s all light, technically.  Other than that, this set is all sizes, all ages, all powers, and all shapes.

Let’s start with  Gabby L., built in 2007 (?), 25.9′ x 13.7′, and rated as 660 hp.

Comparing that, check out Genesis Vigilant, which I first met as Michigan Service, (same order of numbers) 1981, 89′ x 28′, and 3000 hp.

Emily Ann, ex-Solomon Sea, ex-Brandon Roehrig and ex-Diane Roehrig, 1964, 89′ x 28′, and also 3000 hp.

Sea Fox, 2012, 69′ x 24′, and 1400 hp.

Joyce D. Brown, 2002, 78′ x 26′, and 2600 hp.

Fleetmate Thomas J. Brown, 1962, 61′ x 19′, and 1000 hp.

As I said before, technically light but about to engage the Seaspan ship, Jonathan C, 2016, 89′ x 38′, and 6000 hp.

And since we started out with Gabby L, let’s end there also, but you may have to look carefully to the left of the VZ bridge towers . . . . to spot her.  As I said before . . . all shapes and sizes, but they all work a niche in the sixth boro.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Thomas J. Brown came off the ways in 1962 as Thomas J. BrownHere‘s part 1 of this post, from almost a decade ago, and here are many photos since . . .

1962 is the same vintage as this truck, then newly arrived as a grounds truck for a Queens cemetery.  John Glenn went to space for the first time.  The Seattle Space Needle was completed.  And Thomas J. Brown came to the sixth boro.

The Watchtower is now the welcome sign, although the Lady still stands and that arch in the distance still has the same curve.

The Brooklyn Heights piers were active back then as piers, not playing fields.

Only some of the architectural icons existed on the Manhattan skyline when this iconic tugboat came to town.

The icon appearing over the passenger terminal existed in no one’s imagination, and containerization and the cranes to handle containers were on no drawing boards.

The Municipal Building and the Brooklyn Bridge, icons of the day, were already past the half century mark.   Cable Queen, already 10 years old, made the front page of the newspaper in almost exactly the same position. 

 

Thomas J. Brown has certainly worked around these waters for a long time, as Thomas J. Brown.

I’d love to see photos of the sixth boro and the other vessels of the harbor from her first year.   That year was the first for this WYTL, as well. Does anyone know how that restoration is going?  A Kristy Ann Reinauer was built, although she was then called Interstate Transporter–which sounds somewhat like a space vehicle–and but she’s already razor blades.

The vessel locally known today as Empire State VI was launched.  A young Johnny Cash was alive and singing about “Big River.”  Here‘s a much older one singing the same song, and that river is still whisking time away.

All photos of this icon among icons by Will Van Dorp, who puts these other facts about 1962 out there. By the way, that year, the first Walmart AND the first K-Mart opened, and their paths have truly diverged.

And here it is . . . almost last call for votes, polling for the calendar pages.

Back in the sixth boro . . . it’s a head-on shot of Thomas J. Brown, with multiple icons of the harbor behind her.

Mister T pushes some loaded barges out east beneath the 59th Street Bridge in the photo below,

and tows twice as many empties westbound in the next photo.

Mary Turecamo shifts deck cargo barge New York from Red Hook over toward the other container ports of NYC/NJ, keeping a good number of trucks off the roads and bridges.

Meredith C. Reinauer moves RTC 150 out in the direction of the Sound.

Philadelphia pushes fuel barge Double Skin 503 into the Kills, over to where Ellen McAllister assists Genesis Liberty out of her IMTT berth.

Then Genesis Liberty moves GM 11105 around and outbound.

Robert Burton, usually pushing compacted garbage barges, the other day was doing

rock scow duty.

And rounding out this post, Ava M. McAllister, still in her first half year of working in the sixth boro, heads out to escort in a vessel just in from sea.

All photos recently by Will Van Dorp.

 

She arrived in the harbor almost six years ago, just before the annual football event, and that’s why I called her that.  Speculation about a name change then from Left Coast Lifter had been rampant, but so far as I know, she has remained LCL.

Above, that’s the last photo I took of her by the TZ Bridge, with Hook Mountain in the background, and below, that’s where she now waits, likely to be down rigged.

I suppose speculation now will be her next destination.  Meanwhile she’ll be a part of the temporary landscape at Weeks, skyline, or crane forest, and she’ll be photographed, as I’ve done here here with MC-41 Snazzy Kitty,

Lady May, and

Thomas J. 

Check her out before she’s lowered for travel.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Other large cranes I’ve posted include Paul Bunyan, Grasse River, Pelicano 1, and Herman the German.  Then there’s the Chesapeake 1000.

 

Frances heads out to earn some money on a rainy yesterday morning.  I’ve no idea what that red glow behind the Statue is.

Lincoln Sea has worked on both coasts since I’ve been doing this blog, and like Frances, has kept the same name.  Click here to see her in my second ever blog post . . . 2006.

Michael Miller here moves equipment to and from islands in the boro’s archipelago.  I first saw this vessel as Stapleton Service.

Annie G II goes way back on this blog too.  Recently she’s been doing a job over west of the Staten Island Ferry racks, a job she was the perfect size for.   She’s a WGI tug.

Jane A. Bouchard was out along the east side of Staten Island, passing the old US Marine Hospital.  See it here if you scroll way through.

Ellen McAllister was heading out for a call.  I likely first posted a photo of her here.

In that photo earlier, Jane was headed to meet up with Evening Star and her barge.

James E. Brown and Thomas J. Brown tag teamed car float NYNJR 200, the newest and largest car float in the sixth boro.

Ditto, CMT Pike and Helen Laraway meet up on a set of scows.

And to close this out, it’s Austin Reinauer, Boston-bound in the rain.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are all the previous installments of this series.

Glenn Raymo caught this photo up the Hudson the other day, as Joker assisted a Weeks crane.  Hays tugs do come up here occasionally, but I’ve never seen them.

Back almost exactly six years ago, the same boat headed upriver as a dead ship.  And eight years ago, working for a different company and painted in a different livery, here she was . . .  2011, eastbound in the KVK.

Justin Zizes was coming down the Hudson recently and caught this spring-evoking photo of Nathan G, her gray livery and aggregate cargo set off by the hint of leaves on the tree-lined far shore.

Thanks to Justin also for this photo of Mister Jim in her homeport in Coeymans.

Jan van der Doe sent these photos along of a group of northern European tugs at work, taken in early April by Jan Oosterboer, not far from Rotterdam.

Mutratug 32 is a Carrousel Rave tug, which means she rotate her point of attachment to better brake the assisted vessel.  To see her in action, click here.

And finally, see the tugs in this photo I took on the East River the other day?  Two of them?

Thomas J. Brown is obvious and always a delight to see.  But then there’s Bosco on the barge.  I believe she was heading for a job on the Hutchinson River.

Thanks to Glenn, Justin, Jan, and Jan for photos here.

 

A confusing pic?

This is more clearly Capt. Brian A. and Eric, the two newest McAllisters in the boro, bringing up the stern of Gerd Maersk.

Much less similar, Ellen and Patrice here work the bow of an outbound tanker.

That top photo may be confusing as the ninth photo here is.  So let me conclude by showing the photos taken seconds before and seconds after it.

For all I know, the smaller Brown tug may have been doing some training.  I snapped that top photo when they were neck-and-neck from my vantage point.  Eventually Thomas J. overtook Joyce.  

The phots in between allow one to see how meticulous the paint scheme is on these boats.  I’d love to see the engine room and other interior spaces.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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