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The year 2007 spawned this series here.  Since you’ve stayed with this blog, I’m celebrating a milestone . . . the 300th post in this series.  Thanks for continued visits to tugster.  To honor this event, I solicited photos from you, particularly photos that’d never previously appeared on this blog.  I threw some of my own unusual ones in to round out the post.  Thanks to all who sent in photos, or thought about it, and added some explanation.  Since the internet allows quick and easy photo exchanges globally, I’m always interested in folks sharing photos of tugboats and other workboats from everywhere.  Vladivostok?  Karachi?  Baku?  Port of Spain?  Paramaribo?  Douala?  Luanda?  Umm Qasr?   I hope you get the idea.

Tim Sansom wrote:  ” taken at Auckland’s Wynyard Quarter in December 2016, showing the tugboat Koraki and the cement barge Marsden BayKoraki, built in 1985, regularly hauls cement barges between Auckland and Whangarei for Golden Bay Cement. The Wynyard Quarter is a redeveloped part of Auckland harbour between the ferry and cruise ship terminal and the marina, and usually has a few fishing boats tied up as well as ferries to the Hauraki Gulf islands, one of which you can see in the background.”

I took this one of Elizabeth Anne at the King’s Point dock in 2015. That’s the Throg’s Neck Bridge in the background.  The 1980 tug was donated to the US Merchant Marine Academy in 2014.

I took this on Oneida Lake NY in November 2016.  My platform was craneship Ward’s Island, now fish and other aquatic life habitat, but then was doing one of its last seasons plucking channel markers from the NYS Canals portion of the Lake. Tug Syracuse, 77′ x 20′ , has worked exclusively in NYS Canals since spring 1934.

William Mitchell took this photo of Donna and Charlie Costa’s Hobo in Wickford RI.

Jan van Sluisweg took this photo of the 1976 Arion, 94′ x 30′, towing City of Dubrovnik and approaching the lock in IJmuiden in 2014.

From Kyle Stubbs:  “Brusco’s Capt Bob Campbell hasn’t appeared and  offers a fun connection to Lindy Marie seen in your post Columbia River Tugs. Both the Lindy Marie (as  Fireball) and Capt Bob Campbell (as  Warrior), were in-house products of the Smith Tug and Barge Company of Rainier, Oregon. Founder Wilbur Smith had been witness to a number of accidents on tugboat decks, and as a result embraced a design philosophy that eliminated blind spots on the deck as seen from the pilothouse. The result was a series of tugs with unique, sloped deckhouses that earned the company the nickname of the “Studebaker Fleet” in reference to that automaker’s distinctive models of the 1950’s.”

The Studebaker fleet . . . I love that.  Kyle took this photo at Grays Harbor on the Washington coast.

From George Schneider:  “Maybe this one is too wee to count, but she’s the tug Elsa.  She was built back in 1955 by the Welding and Shipbuilding Company of Costa Mesa CA as their hull #1, and to my knowledge, the only vessel built there.  Her original owner was Francis P. Jones of the Jones Tug & Barge Company of Long Beach CA.  At the time she was 50 ft in length and rated at 290 HP.  Jones later lengthened her to about 60 ft. (58 ft registered) and HP was increased to 600.   Jones closed shop in the 1980s.  Since then she’s moved bunker barges in the Los Angeles-Long Beach area, and is now owned by Global Marine Transportation Inc. of Los Angeles.”

Another from George, not so wee: “Here’s my next , a Gulf tug.  She was originally built as Abdon Martin by Halter Marine at their New Orleans yard in 1976, and ownership was always listed as Halter Marine Inc, although Andrew Martin Sea Service Inc. appears to be a separate company who operated her.   In 1985 she was sold to the N. J. Guidry & Sons Towing Company, who remained listed as her owner while named Harvey Trojan, showing Harvey Gulf Intl. markings.  When Harvey Gulf decided to concentrate on supply boat activities, they sold her in 2014 to Signet Maritime Corp, and since then she has sailed as their Signet Trojan.”    If my info is correct, she’s 110′ x 34′ and rated at 13,500 hp.

From Antonio Alcaraz:  “VB Andalucia [built in 2004 and 97’x 36′] underway service Algeciras port.”

One of my own from Block Island, it’s Petersburg in October 2015.  The 1954 107′ tug was recently used in a movie.

Another of mine from February 2016, Sea Wolf A in Havana harbor.  The 1996 tug was built by Damex Shipbuilding in Santiago Cuba.

And in the sixth boro, I took this one of Paul T Moran.  Currently the 1975 built 138′ x 40′ 150′ x 49′ behemoth is in Mobile AL

Westbound in the East River, it’s Thomas D. Witte with Powhatan alongside.  My record keeping for the period is scrambled, but i believe I took this is 2005 or 2006.  As of this writing Powhatan, now operated by the Turkish Navy as Inebolu A590 is on the Turkish Black Sea coast between Trabzon and Samsun.

Again from George Schneider, who took it in June 2014 on Portrero Reach, Richmond CA on San Francisco Bay:  “One class of tugs you may not have seen in the Sixth Borough are the recent tractor tugs from Jensen Maritime Consultants.  They’re a widely respected group, evolving since Bay Delta put the first one in service in 2007.  Since that time, some of the majors have chartered these from Bay Delta, including Foss, Crowley, and AmNav, and once the quality of the design was recognized, companies have also gone directly to Jensen’s to have them built.  Bay-Delta began congealing as a company in the early 1990’s with second-hand tonnage.  They remain small, but obviously have been a leader in tug development.   This shows Delta Cathryn, built by Nichols Brothers in 2009.  She’s the second Jensen tug by that name, the first is now operating for Crowley as Vigilant.   In 2019 the first hybrid tug of this series, Delta Teresa,  was completed and also immediately chartered to Crowley.”

I took this photo of Ocean Henry Bain in Quebec City in March 2017.  The 2006 z-drive measures in at 95′ x 37.’

From Maraki, a Chinese built tug Pino, working in Colombia then off Cartagena.

Many thanks to Tim, William, Jan, Kyle, Antonio, George, and Maraki for these delightful photos and text.  I’d love to do this again, maybe at the 400 mark, or maybe sooner.  My editor is very easy-going.

 

 

 

It’s that time again . . .  a glance back at exactly a decade ago.  Back in June 2009, the 400th anniversary of the Half Moon going up the Hudson kicked off with a 20th century version of the Half Moon going up the Hudson.  Note the banner hung to the old TZ Bridge along the right side of the photo.   That replica is now in the Netherlands, looking for a new home, and that bridge–parts of it–have become fish structure somewhere off Long Island.

A newish boat in town was Peter F. Gellatly, now Vane’s Long Island.

Bounty–alas her fate–was still an irregular visitor to the sixth boro.  Here she’s made up to Harvey just outboard of Frying Pan.

Brian Nicholas moves a scrap barge out of the East River.

Paul T. Moran made one of her really rare visits to the sixth boro.

Container vessels calling in the ports of NY and NJ had not yet become UL . . .  ultra large versions

Harvey follows Half Moon northbound on the Hudson.

Michigan Service and Erie Service gather near IMTT.

Sisters assists with a tanker, and

here’s more of the River Day procession marking the year of Half Moon the first.

All photos taken in June 2009 by Will Van Dorp.

. . . and beyond.  Let’s start with August 7, 2008 . . . up by the Iroquois lock of the Seaway.  And Canadian Provider . . .  well . . . in 2013 she was towed to Aliaga as OVI, and scrapped. Note that she’s a straight-decker . . . no self-unloading gear.

August 14 . . . reef-making consisted of sinking subway cars.  These went off Atlantic City.  To see their condition now, click here.

August 16 in the Arthur Kill, Volunteer was off to remake the tow.  Built in 1982, she met the scrappers earlier this year.

August 20 . . . Laura K and Margaret–I believe –have just helped Glasgow Express to Howland Hook terminal.  Glasgow (2002) is still at work, and so are Laura K (in Savannah) and Margaret in the sixth boro.

August 23 . . . Colleen McAllister and Dean Reinauer bring a barge through the Gate, reading for the Sound.  Colleen is now owned by for Port City Tug Company of Grosse Point.  Has anyone seen her in operation?  Dean went to Nigeria aboard Blue Marlin. 

Christine M McAllister stands by in Erie Basin on August 24.  This 6000hp tug is currently working down south of here.

August 27 . .  . the reclusive Susan E. Witte eastbound and Adriatic Sea westbound.  Beyond Adriatic, that might be Aegean.  Adriatic is currently on a tow on the 2000+ stretch of Ocean between Honolulu and Kwajalein!  Can someone confirm this?  Nine years ago, I caught Adriatic near the Bear Mountain Bridge here (scroll).

August 29 . . . Coral Sea westbound, while later in the same day,

the scarcely-seen up here Paul T Moran heads for the Bridge while Maryland approaches from that direction.  Coral Sea has gone to West Africa, Maryland has become Liz Vinik, and Paul T stays mostly around the Gulf.

The Tugboat Races and other contests were on the 31st that year.  Here Justin shows good style hitting that bollard.

HMS Liberty mixes it up with some real history.  Edith went down to Trinidad and the venerable Dorothy Elizabeth (1951) was scrapped the next year. Liberty is still in the sixth boro.

And to close it out . . . the 1907 Pegasus made a showing at the races that year.  She’s laid up on the morris Canal so far as I know.

  

I hope you enjoyed these walks through waters no longer here.

Now my big announcement:  as this posts, I’m on board Grande Mariner for the next seven weeks, Chicago bound.  I will post when I can with what photos I can.  But I’ve done that before.  GWA (Going west again) was my series title last year.  You have to read this one about my role on the vessel.   GW was the title I used in 2016.

Maybe this year it should TGWYA . . . thank god i’m going west again . . .  Anyhow . . . this is my version of a “gone fishing’ sign.

 

 

Edda Fram runs back and forth, it seems, from shore (Scotland)  to various oil platforms in the North Sea.  Rough weather operation necessitates seats hard to fall out of.

Solomon T, once operated by Elbert Felton (shown), is a 1938 restored inside the Outer Banks fishing vessel, with seat and wheel appropriate to 1938.

MV Argyle is a ferry that operates on the Firth of Clyde.

T-ATF 172 USNS Apache has a spacious bridge.

Tug Mississippi, in service doing commercial work since 1916 (102 years!!) has a “bar stool” and a tiller.  It was repowered from steam to diesel electric in 1957.

Converted Bering Sea crabber Ocearch has wide bridge.  Here’s an article I did on their shark research program a year and a half ago.  Follow individuals of different species of shark around  the ocean in real time here.

A seat on an ATB? here’s the spacious wheelhouse of Paul T Moran.

Lake Express is a fast ferry that crosses Lake Michigan several times a day from Milwaukee to Muskegon.  One of these days, I’ll cross the lake fast.

Here’s another fast ferry, Athena,  sometimes serving Block Island.

Kaori is a 2004 tug operating in New Caledonia.

I’ll close out this post with the seat of power in the powerful Ocean Taiga.  For an article I wrote on this St. Lawrence tug, click here.

To protect the anonymity of some folks who sent along these photos, let me just give a tip of the hat to all the photographers.  Unless you send along more photos or unless I take some more, this’ll be the last in this series.  Any seats out there in strange colors?

This post represents no more the definitive port of Tampa than a sampling of an hour’s worth of  traffic on the KVK, at the Brooklyn Bridge, or past the Holland Tunnel vents would be a definitive capture of the sixth boro of NYC.  I’m grateful to a nameless Nemo for these shots . . . like the coal-pushing Jason E. Duttinger and the barge Winna Wilson.

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Here’s the 6000 hp Duttinger out of the notch.

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As is OSG Endurance, 8000 hp.

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From l to r, Sea Hawk . . . 8000 hp, Valiant . . .also 8000,    and Linda Moran . . . 5100. I’m not sure what the small tug in the distance is.   Also, click here and scroll to see the last time Sea Hawk has appeared in tugster, painted green.

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And finally, what’s not visible in the photo below is Paul’s nose.  Click here to see a light bow-forward photo of Paul T. Moran.

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Again, many thanks to nN for these photos.

Need sunglasses for this drama on the Hudson?   “Random” means … spotted  in a plethora of places, like Elizabeth, passing the Hudson waterfront at dusk with a barged Weeks crane 532 in tow.  Note the Crow or Cheyenne in push gear with barge on the far left.

Paul T Moran at Gulf Marine Repair in Tampa.  Not to be insensitive to customary modes of dress, but–as east river pointed out– doesn’t this vaguely like a burka or abaya from the eyes down on the tug?

Justine McAllister pulling a light RTC 120 south of Catskill.

Atlantic Coast pushing Cement Transporter 5300 south of –you guessed it–Cementon, NY.

Meredith C. Reinauer pushing a loaded RTC 150 toward the Highlands.   By the way, if you’re looking for a fun read, try the novel by T. C. Boyle called World’s End . . . my current source of chuckles.

Sea Hawk in Brooklyn Navy Yard last June appearing tied up to sludge tanker North River.

Connecticut (1959?) crosses the Sound north to south.

That’s it for now.  Thanks to Deb DePeyster (who previous contributed to this) for the foto of Elizabeth,  and to eastriver for the foto of Paul T Moran.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

<<Only 17 hours left as of now to bid the PortSide fundraiser…. catered dinner with Bowsprite and Tugster.  Bid now here.>>

More on what defeated the “gloomy Junie” bugs in my head  . . . . and I know the fotos lack winter-sharp clarity, but if I attempted to shoot these today, quality would be even less sharp, given the intermittent rain.

The three men below focus on the business-end of the cutter suction dredge Illinois.  That cutter-head begs to serve as inspiration for a horror movie.  Brangus is one of two associated tugs, the other being Jack Newman, shown yesterday.

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Here’s the rest of Brangus and more of Illinois.  When the toothy end of the dredge burrows into the bottom of the Bay, the large rectangular object (motor and gears?) submerges as well, like a woodchuck’s tail following the digging claws.  More dredge fotos soon.  Can anyone educate me on what I’m looking at in these fotos?  In the background is the bow of Horizon Challenger, an old container ship built in 1968!  I could do more on Horizon Challenger.

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The sixth boro’s oldest (and possibly most active) schooner Pioneer scuds into the choppy East River lowering the foresail.  It does look like it’d be fun to sail on a day like this.

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The pennant snaps in exhilaration, but is that the desired angle for the descending gaff?  Don’t misunderstand my intent:  bravo to the jaunty crew.

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DonJon’s Mary Alice tows the massive Chesapeake 1000 as Megan Ann provides assist at the stern.  Chesapeake 1000, the largest floating heavy-lift crane on the East Coast, has participated in efforts ranging from post-Katrina clean-up, salvage of Stellamare, and demolitions/construction more than I know.  Anyone have Chesapeake 1000 stories to share?

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James Turecamo quickly passes products tanker with a top-of-the-hierarchy name:  Archangelos Gabriel.  I harbor affection for this 1969 Matton Shipyard built tug.  By the way, Matton Shipyard, walking distance from Waterford,  this August will launch the WOW fleet tour.

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It always makes my soul jolly to spot Odin, especially after what seems like a too-long hiatus.  Have I been away, or has Odin cleft (cloved cloven?)  other waters on assignment?

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Paul T. Moran waits on the hook, as does Socrates in the background, a 2008 Panamax tanker of the TEN group.

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So here’s a mystery.  As was the case a few years ago, a vessel of the Japan Coast Guard docks over in Brooklyn near the Heights/Red Hook line.   Provisioning, I assume.    Anyone help?  Yeah . . . I’m not proud of the quality of photography here;  some days I can only privilege content.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp on June 17, 2009.

Getting all this torrential rain bodes well for a bright Saturday Mermaid Parade, or at least that “wishful thinking” part of me says.  If you can’t make it, at least wish someone a sparkling summer solstice . . . in however they choose to celebrate it.  I do the same to you right now with this foto from last year’s parade.

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Hoboken, 43′ loa, and never been anything but Hoboken living on Frank Sinatra Drive, launched 1963;

Meredith C. Reinauer, a pin boat since launch in 2002, 123′ loa;

Megan McAllister, ex-Arthur F. Zeman Jr., 77′ loa, launched 1985;

Penn No. 4, ex-Morania No. 4, 1973 and 120′ loa;

Penobscot, ex-Wm J. McPhillips, 99′ loa, launched 1959, and registered in Boothbay;

After bunkering Nowegian Dawn, here’s Solomon Sea, ex-Brandon C. Roehrig and Diane E. Roehrig, 89′ loa and 1964;

Paul T. Moran, 138′ loa and since 1975 dba Ocean Venture, S/R Golden State, Exxon Golden State, and Eliska;

and Java Sea, ex-Patriot, 1981 and 110′

and the oldest is . . .  Penobscot.  What?  I already said that?  Just back from self-assigned project weekend.  Details will follow.  Welcome back too–you know who yous are.

Photos, WVD.

As promised in late August, we return to Paul‘s nose, an interesting nose with a built-in ladder,

one that’s larger than Lady Liberty’s 4.5 footer.

Viking‘s lacks some of the detail.

I wonder why.

Photos, WVD.

day left.  What might be a possible contender entered the Kills yesterday . . . the Paul T.  (just my speculation).  Huge and dark in the cloudy weather, Paul T.  humbled me.  I know I’ve seen others with greater power, but this machine had a looming presence.  Its silent power reminded me  of the first time I saw a humpback whale from a small boat.  One foto below for now;  more will follow showing Paul’s nose.  The inimitable Fred also has a foto of Paul T, along with pleas for your vote.  So vote for Fred or whoever you prefer . . . but vote . . . early and often (Oops!  Can’t do that.)

Some vitals:  built 1975.  7200 hp, 138′ x 40′ 13′ and ex-Ocean Venture, S/R and Exxon Golden State, Eliska.

Pegasus, foto below, is reportedly showing up for the race tomorrow.  I took this foto in 2006 (I think) and so look forward to seeing the mythical flyer in the North River creating white water in 2008, her 101st year!!

Some vitals:  built 1907. 96′  x 23′ x 11′ and ex-Socony 16, Socony, Esso Tug 1, John E. McAllister.

Two final fotos:  seconds after the start of the 2006 race, and

a portrait of yours truly . . . as captured by my partner-in-everything . . . Elizabeth.  I’d love to talk with you tomorrow.  Have a fun and safe day.  Again, thanks to the organizers.

Finally, I’ve added a link called diesel duck to my blogroll . . . interesting writing and fotos.  And one more question–wherever is the small tug Rachel Marie, prime mover of the Smithson “Floating Island,” three years ago?  Tomorrow, I’ll post fotos as soon as I’m back from the Race.

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