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Wow!  August almost passed us by without my doing a glance back to a decade ago.  McCrews is now in Philly I’m told.   Reliance and Justine are still with McAllister.  Lynx was sold foreign  and experienced an incident while being delivered, although I’m not sure how that turned out.  Barents and Yankee both were refurbished by Donjon:  Barents Sea is now Atlantic Enterprise and Yankee is now Signet Atlantic and sans upper wheelhouse.   Mark McAllister was scrapped, and Na-Hoku under the same name works for a company  based in Charleston SC.

 Ellen McAllister here was bringing in the future Alex McAllister, which has gone on to spend a lot of time working in the sixth boro, although I’ve not noticed her recently.

Patrice (had just had a tragic delivery fire in this photo)  and Bruce still work based out of the sixth boro.

 

I never did see Yankee after her upper wheelhouse was removed.  I may have to return to the GOM if I ever want to see her.

Duty is now Nydia P, and I’d have to go to Puerto Rico to see her.

Ireland became Hoppiness, and has been converted to a liveaboard on Lake Ontario but headed the inland waterways of the TVA system.

Labrador Sea is now Vane’s Brooklyn.

And finally, here’s a mixed set:  OSG 350 and OSG Vision still work under those names, Amy Moran became Stasinos John Joseph, and Scotty Sky became a snow bird and sails the Caribbean.

All August 2012, WVD, who after reflecting on all those changes admits to not being the same person as in August 2012 any more either.

 

It’s time for a February installment of “retro sixth boro,” a glance back at some of the boats working in New York harbor exactly a decade ago.  Cheyenne was still here, pushing a scow out the east end of the KVK.

I’m not sure the 61′ x 22′  1970 Salvage Master is still in the harbor.  Even back a decade ago, I only saw it once or twice.

The 1962 Kristy Ann Reinauer was scrapped in 2015.  The 2000 Tokyo Express is still around;  in fact, I believe I saw it just recently. 

The 1980 Independence was pushing 1982 tank barge OSG 243Independence was scrapped in 2020, and the barge laid up.

The 1981 Huron Service is now Genesis Victory.  The 1976 Atlantic Salvor has carried that name since 1998.

Na’hoku (Na Hoku) is a 1981 tugboat that spent a short time in the boro a decade ago;  later in 2012, Na’hoku (meaning stars, as used for navigation in Hawaiian) was sold to a South Carolina company that kept the name.  As of this writing, she’s in Fernandina Beach FL.  As for DBL 85, a tank barge by that name was built in 2009 and is likely still in use.

The 1976 Barents Sea switched over to Kirby and then in 2016, re-emerged as Donjon’s Atlantic Enterprise.  Along the left side of the photo, Casablanca is a 1987 barge.

All photos, WVD, from February 2012.

Ten years ago, the lower Manhattan skyline looked quite different.  A vessel bringing orange juice from the southern hemisphere was also a smaller one;  the 1985 Orange Blossom last sailed into Alang six and a half years ago, and if you don’t know what that means, click on the Alang link.  As it turns out, I may have caught photos of her last voyage inbound  Port Newark here.     Orange Blossom 2 completes her most recent voyage today, arriving in Santos BR–read this link for some superlatives–after departing the sixth boro on November 13. 

I’d thought 1976 Barents Sea was a goner, a reef candidate, when I caught this photo of her running after a long hiatus, but she was thoroughly rehabbed and lives on as Atlantic Enterprise.

The 1970 Evening Tide below was nearly 40 years into her career with Bouchard;  she’s now a Stasinos boat but her superstructure still painted in this brilliant red.

Laura K Moran–launched 2008– was among the top horsepower assist tugs in the harbor then.  She currently works in Savannah.

The 1981 McKinley Sea is currently laid up, carrying Kirby livery.

Ice Base and I had a misunderstanding;  upon first seeing her and lacking at that time a smart phone with AIS, I read her name as something different that I can no longer un-see. She’s currently in the port of Quintero CL, 50 miles north of Valparaiso, with the less ambiguous name of Cabo San Vicente.

Back in those days I often took advantage of the walkway along the west side of the Bayonne Bridge, something I’ve not done with the new walkway.  Note the absolutely ship-shape Gramma Lee T Moran as seen from above assisting 

NYK Romulus with Margaret Moran standing by.   Margaret is still in our fair boro, Gramma Lee is in Baltimore, and NYK Romulus is currently in Southampton UK.

The 1973 Amy Moran has been sold out of the fleet, and was last in the Jacksonville FL area wearing Stasinos tan and green as John Joseph.

And tomorrow I’ll post a part B of December 2011 retrospective, building on the odd orange vessel shown below.

All photos from December 2011, WVD, who’s astonished by the amount of change in a decade.

 

 

In case you’re new to this blog,”retro” means I’m looking back to my photo archives exactly 10 years to June 2011.  The “38” here means this is the thirty-eighth month I’ve done this.  It’s a fresh look at June 2011 photos, in some cases informed by whatever the past 10 years has wrought.

Bridge Builder 26 doing what it is named for. 

F. Dawson, 1969, 66′ x 22′ and 1000 hp, in 2011 was working on a bridge project in the Harlem River. I’ve no idea where either of these boats is today.

Patapsco, 2004 and 96′ x  34′ and now known as Steven Wayne, was one of the first Vane boats into the sixth boro.  

Susquehanna is a Patapsco-class tugboat, meaning mostly a clone and three years younger, and still in the Vane fleet.

Marlin (1974, 96′ x 35′, and 4200) and Penn No. 6Marlin‘s now registered in Panama, and the No. 6 is now Vinik No. 6.

Kathleen Turecamo is now buff and green, a Stasinos boat, seen here as Meaghan Marie.

Matthew Tibbetts is still in the sixth boro and at work.

This was the only time I saw Hercules, ex-YTB-766.  In June 2011, it was towed here and then loaded aboard a semi-sub for Nigeria. 

Barents Sea came back to life as Atlantic Enterprise, and is currently working on a salvage/recovery down south.

All photos and memories, WVD.

There will be a mermaid parade later this summerin 2011, it took place on the Saturday closest to the solstice, which would be today.

More of the Great Race soon . . . but a bit of back story.

When I moved to our fair metropolis in 2000 and started paying attention, I was taken by the Bayonne Bridge, so enamored in fact that I choose it as the header image for this blog in 2006, and now out of stubbornness– or something– have kept the old view.

I renewed my focus on the Bridge in 2011, “turning” became the key word in the titles.  Click here to see posts I did for its 80th, 84th, and 86th anniversary of initial construction, and here I marked the 80 mark again twice.   Over 10 years ago I alluded to the raising for the first time here.

Here’s a single post that looks at the change from 2011 until 2017.

For a baseline, let’s use sunrise April 24, 2008, looking from the west, those two boats are Justine McAllister and Huron Service, now Genesis Victory.

And from the east, December 2011, and that boat was Barents Sea, currently known as Atlantic Enterprise.   As to the bridge, note the box-grid work (not a technical term) on the Bayonne side of the arch.

From Richmond Terrace (Staten Island) perspective, here’s the bridge in February 2012.

By September 13, the box grid was covered, possibly to allow sand blasting.

By January 2014, the cover was off the box grid.  Yes, that’s Specialist.

By October 2015, the box grid was being extended upward, as

the vertical supports were being erected farther into Bayonne.

Here’s a December 15 view, showing the symmetry of the construction.

Here’s March 2016, and you can begin to see the location of the raised roadbed.

Here’s a view from May 2016 from the west side of the Bayonne shore.

By August 2016, the new span has been completely defined.

Here’s a closer up, showing the old level–still poet traffic–and the new level, along with the device used to place pre-cast portions of the new road bed.   The tug is Taft Beach.

Here, as seen from the west side, is most of the bridge in September 2016.  Note the gap still remaining on the Staten Island side.

By March 23,  2017, the upper deck was open to wheeled traffic, and the lower deck was ready to be dismantled.

Here’s a closer-up of that opening.

By April 2, a gap existed, and

by April 11, 2017, ships that might have scrapped  year before were shooting through the opening that grew wider by the week.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who will continue this progression soon.

I’m working on some tougher posts, but here’s an easy one.  Let’s flip the calendar back approximately 10 years, give or take a month.  Then it was Barents Sea, not Atlantic Enterprise.  Rowan M. McAllister is still around, although in Charleston SC.  And the container ship under the “un-raised” Bayonne Bridge is Zim Qingdao, currently eastbound across the Atlantic.  The other McAllister tug I don’t know.

Melvin E. Lemmerhirt, now Evelyn Cutler, eastbound toward the Brooklyn Bridge  . . . well, all’s quite changed about all this.

Maryland –I’ve yet to see her as  Liz Vinik–was bunkering the brand new Queen Victoria.

Peking was then–as now–out of the water, although currently her dry dock is in Germany.

Penn No. 4 still goes by the same name, but it’s now a Kirby boat.

George Burrows was never a regular here, and I’ve no idea of her current disposition.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes you enjoyed this backward glance.

 

I’m trying to catch up with the photos you all have been good enough to share on tugster.  The first five here come from some salts up on the Caloosahatchee Canal in Florida.  John Parrish was westbound here, but a week later it showed up in the sixth boro, and by publication of this post, it’s already back to Norfolk.   That’s some sea miles.  Here are some of my previous photos of John Parrish.

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Also, westbound in that Canal, it’s Brittany Beyel.  She’s Beyel Brothers equipment, who have a dramatic photo on that link.

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This one’s eastbound on the Canal with a crane.  I can’t quite make out the name, but the the steersman has great visibility.

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Boomalong was getting hauled out.  Her fine lines made me think she has a storied past, and it turns out she does.  She began life in 1944 in Owen Sound, ON as HMCS Neville, HMCS being Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship.   She’s a Russel Brothers boat that has been around, currently quite far from

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Sault Ste. Marie.

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Thanks to Jed, who previously contributed many photos, here’s a photo and text:  “it’s Stephanie S (1986) returning to Port Canaveral after escorting the bulk carrier VENTURE out of the port.”

photo date 11 MARCH 2016

photo date 11 MARCH 2016

From Birk Thomas, it’s Barents Sea, now over in Port Newark, having moved for the first time in at least five years.  She looks rough, but I’m hoping there’s a make-over in the works for her.   If she moves again, I’d love to see some photos.

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Here’s my photo of W. O. Decker, docked at Caddell Dry Dock, being worked on  . . . or waiting for Wavertree to make her promenade back to South Street.

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From Jason LaDue, here’s a good view of the underbelly of Grouper, frequently referred to in this blog.  Such belly will be visible until the pool level of the Erie Canal is brought back up for the start of the season.  Jason’s also a frequent contributor.

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Now here’s an oldie but goodie from the other JED.  It shows Labrador Sea and Taurus, significant because now that Taurus is being phased out, Labrador Sea–which had worked on the Mississippi and Gulf for the past few years, has moved back up here into Taurus‘ place, I’m told.   And they’re in K-Sea colors.

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And I said “and more” in the title?  Here’s the more, a new dock book from Tony Acabono.  If it’s your business to know where berth 60 is in Port Elizabeth in relation to berth 61 in Port Newark, you might want to check it out.

Many thanks to the secrets salts and the not-so-secret ones for sending along these photos.

 

Here was 4.  Of course, many more than seven Seas exist and work east, south, and west of the United States.

Let’s start with Irish Sea, which was called something before that . . . .

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taken September 2009, with Iona McAllister in Brooklyn Navy Yard

 

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taken February 2016

Siberian Sea, before it was called that.

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taken in 2007

 

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taken in 2009

 

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taken in 2013

 

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taken in 2015

Barents Sea . . . .  anyone have news on her?  She too had names before it became Barents, although I suspect Barents Sea will be her last name ever.

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taken in 2015

Mediterranean Sea, which  originally painted green.

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taken in 2015

McKinley Sea, and I hope you get the point that all these boats had previous names.

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taken in February 2016

Ross Sea, which actually shows its Thoma-Sea heritage. If you don’t know what I mean, look at the string of vessels built by Thoma-Sea just after Ross Sea was launched in February 2003. Thoma-Sea here actually makes eight seas.

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taken in 2015

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Picking up this retrospective post with the beginning of May 2015, it’s a nearly 40-year-old and tired Barents Sea, waiting then as now for what’ll likely be a “fish habitat” future.

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The end of May saw Quantico Creek move Mary Whalen to its public space over in Atlantic Basin.  Was there a docking pilot calling it out from the drone?

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Here’s first glimpse of an early June trip I’ve never reported on via this blog.  More on this vessel will appear soon–currently working in the Dominican Republic.  The red vessel in the distance is F. C. G. Smith, a Canadian Coast Guard survey boat.

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Eastern Dawn pushes Port Chester toward the Kills.

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July opens with the ghost of Lafayette arriving back in the harbor aboard L’Hermione. Click here for the set of posts I did about this person. 

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I’m omitting a lot from my account here;

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The end of July brought me back to the south bank of the KVK watching Joyce D. Brown go by.   July was a truly trying month . .  is all I’ll say for now.

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In early August Wavertree awaited the next step into its rehab, and I

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made a gallivanting stop in New Bedford, a place I’d not visited in too long.

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All photos by will Van Dorp.

Here was the first in the series.  That one ended on a “back-to-work” note.

This one . . . probably will not have a happy ending, unless of course you’re a fish looking for structure or a diver wanting to explore.  Here’s a view of the vessel pre-sixth boro days. And here’s the last time I saw her run.   Call Barents Sea high . . . and potentially wetter and wetter.

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Have a look while you can.

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When she gets reefed, I’d love photos.

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Thanks to Birk, here’s her history.

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Click here for a guide to fishing and diving on New Jersey reefs.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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