You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Atlantic Enterprise’ tag.

Thanks to Joseph Chomicz, it’s Capt. Latham in Port Elizabeth .  .  .

standing by the barge Atlanta Bridge . . .  So here’s my question . . . and answer will be located at the end of this post . . .  in quo vadis?

I’ve not seen this boat in a while . . . the 1958 Blount-built Vulcan III.

 

The “D” stands for Derrick Marine of Perth Amboy.

The current Kristin Poling stands by as Aramon is lightered before it enters the Kills.

Doris Moran moves Portland into the Kills, headed here for Shooters Island before following the channel around to the north.

Jonathan and JRT make their way home after an assist.

Mary Turecamo assists a lightered Aramon to a berth on the Arthur Kill.

Many thanks to Joe for the Capt. Latham pics;  all others by Will Van Dorp, who lacked his real camera to document the answer to the “where goest they?” question above.

Some older cargo cranes go San Juan-bound aboard Atlanta Bridge between Capt. Latham and Atlantic Enterprise.

All the photos in this post I took over a two-hour period Friday.  I post this in part in response to the question raised by a commenter recently, how many tugboats operate in the sixth boro, aka the waters around NYC.

They pass one at a time,

you see them in twos . . . . and that might be a third with the crane barge off the Battery in the distance,

a trio might be assisting a single ULCV,

foreshortening might collapse four into a single shot, and

if you look across the repair and docking yard, you might see five tugs plus one science boat.

And finally for now, move the huge box ship away, and six of more are revealed.

This is the sixth boro, folks, one of the busiest ports in the US.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

The other night in a diner 300 miles from the sixth boro, Jim–holding the remote below and to the left–mentioned his boat models.  His favorite, he said, was Mister Darby.  My interest was piqued, but he went on, describing it as about five feet long and having an automobile battery as a power source.   In fact, he said, one time he sank the model as a result of taking an abrupt turn to port;  the battery wasn’t adequately secured, flipped on its side, dooming the tug.

I met Jim last year in connection with an old boat up on the Saint Lawrence.  I had coffee with him the other day in connection with another boat, one that’s been featured on this blog many times.

Anyhow, when he was finished, I asked if he had a photo of Mister Darby;  sure enough he did.  When I asked what else he knew about Mister Darby, he said it was last in Indonesia.  JMC on the stack expands to Jackson Marine Corporation, a Halliburton company.

So for Jim and everyone else, here’s Mister Darby –now Atlantic Salvor–as she appeared in the September 5, 2010 Great North River Tugboat Race.

 

 

And in late November this year, below she heads west under the Bayonne Bridge.

These days, Atlantic Salvor has a “twin” in the boro also, Atlantic Enterprise, ex-Mister Pete.

The first two come from Jim;  the others by Will Van Dorp, whose favorite Salvor photos were posted here.

By the way, here’s the Mister Darby kit.

Along the Jersey shore . . .  it’s Candace, a Damen Shoalbuster design . . . built at Eastern Shipbuilding in 2004.

Hete’s a slightly sharper, closer shot.

Working with Candace in dredge support, it’s Trevor.

Trying to keep her ground tackle tackling the bay bed, it’s Linda Moran holding with Houston.

OSG 350 is practically a ship . . . and she’s pushed by

a force more powerful than what drives some ships, the 12,000 hp OSG Vision.  I first saw her here in 2010.

Also, holding fast or trying to, it’s Genesis Valiant, previously Erie Service.

In much calmer weather, it’s Nicole Leigh Reinauer and

Atlantic Enterprise, formerly Barents Sea.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Behold the Atlantics  . . . being A Salvor with the dump scow Witte 4003  and

A Enterprise . . . with the Chesapeake 1000. It’s delightful to see them now as twins, which they are, but hadn’t appeared to be.  Before we move to the next pictures, though, what are the “poles” beyond the dump scow?

The ridge is the highlands of Monmouth County above with West Bank Light below.

Mary Alice and Atlantic Salvor have been shuttling quite a few dump scows the past few weeks, it seems.

 

Caitlin Ann–which I first saw as Vivian L. Roehrig and later as Caribbean Sea— followed Enterprise in.

Different day, different towing arrangement . . . Atlantic Salvor returns with a light dump scow Weeks 258.

Caitlin Ann heads under the Bayonne Bridge, past its dismantled piers.

And the “poles” belong to  L/B Vision coming into the harbor with

her 95′ spindly spuds.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Just to reiterate . . . random in the sixth boro these are.  And the other day, I felt blessed for reasons you’ll understand by the end of this post.  Here Atlantic Enterprise emerges from the Arthur Kill and heads for home in Newark Bay.  That church, “a scaled down copy of the great cathedral at Cologne,” makes this seem quite a European-inflected image.

I took all these photos that weather day last week . . . note how the rain in downtown Elizabeth washes out the Union County Courthouse tower.

A bit later Mister Jim enters the east end of the Kills and then

feigns a ship assist.

The mighty Patricia travels east for a scrap run.

 

as Janet D moves in the direction

of her base.

Why did I feel blessed . . . ?  In the same but of morning, I saw both Atlantic Enterprise and Atlantic Salvor

although not in the same frame, they must have met up in the DonJon yard over in Port Newark.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Today’s photos and text by my friend Lew, whose annotations I adapted.

“Crews with lots of blue equipment have been dredging Old Saybrook North Cove off the CT River.  Though they’ve has been here since mid-November, this is about the first chance I got to take some pictures.  I was out for a late afternoon bicycle ride and had only my phone and “beater” pocket camera.”
Off Old Saybrook,  which tug?

Here’s dredge Michigan with Brian Nicholas and Paul Andrew….

 

 

“Though the sun doesn’t cooperate for those us shore-bound by an early haul-out this time of year, they take the loaded scows out to Long Island Sound where approx 1/2 mile offshore, dredge Delaware Bay (spudded down off the Knollwood section of Old Saybrook) transloads to a larger barge that

Atlantic Enterprise takes to the New Haven dumpsite.”

Many thanks to Lew for these photos, especially this good profile of Atlantic Enterprise.

And here’s something quite unrelated . . . want reclaimed barn lumber for the finest of projects, check here.

Finally . . . Atlantic Enterprise and I get close-up, and it’s appropriate that it should happen over by Bergen Point, where I had an encounter with Atlantic Salvor so many years ago.

When I heard VTS mention her on the VHF, I was hoping she was light or towing on the wire.  No matter, with zoom I was able to get acceptable photos for now.

Atlantic Salvor these days appears to be in Mobile, after having done some post-Maria clean-up in Puerto Rico.

Enterprise has been operating on a dredging project near the mouth of the Connecticut River.  More on that tomorrow.

After the turn, she heads north into Newark Bay to the Donjon homeport with Witte 4003.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who previously posted photos of this boat as Barents Sea here and here, and Enterprise here; in addition to many others.

For Jack Ronalds’ photo of Atlantic Enterprise at the Canso lock, click here.

Enterprise seems a great title for a post on National Maritime Day, but here’s a question answered at the end of this post:  Why–other than the 1933 proclamation by Congress–is May 22 chosen for this day?  Answer at the end of this post.

Jake van Reenen took these photos yesterday in Clayton, NY.  The title evokes my Salvor post from eight plus years ago.

Atlantic Enterprise and crane barge are headed to the sixth boro, still many sea miles ahead.

Jarrett M assists with the tow, a role it played about a month upstream through the same waters here.

 

 

I’m eager to see this Salvor twin back in the sixth boro.

This post from nearly 10 years ago features my first view of this vessel–then called Barents Sea–under way.

Many thanks to Jake for these photos.  If all goes as planned, Enterprise will arrive here in less than two weeks.  Eyes peeled?

So, May 22 . . . it’s National Maritime Day because of Savannah, that’s SS Savannah, she who began the first Atlantic crossing on this date under steam power 199 years ago . . . well, at least steam powered her wheels for a little over 10% of the trip, but you need to start somewhere, eh?  And this fact is alluded to in the 1933 proclamation, as well as in the 2017 proclamation.

 

Click on the photo to get the source of the photo and the story of her short life.  And the 199 years ago, that just begs for some sort of memorializing in 2018…

Did Hurricane Sandy unearth SS Savannah wreckage?  Read here.

 

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