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June 2012 was pivotal for me.  A photo sent along by a friend alerted me to Canal commerce–Canadian corn– entering the US at Oswego, a place I knew something of from my youth. 

If that was a spark, then the breeze that fanned it was an invitation to do my trial article for Professional Mariner magazine, which led me to Kingston NY, the mouth of the Rondout, and a project involving use of a half century old tug Cornell to do TOAR signoffs.  My most recent article in the magazine came out today and can be seen here.

On that assignment, I was privileged to have a mentor, Brian Gauvin, do the photography.

Other big events for June 2012 included the movement of shuttle Enterprise from JFK airport ,

ultimately to the Intrepid Museum to be

hoisted onto the flight deck as part of the display, now covered.

My daughter went off to Brasil (again) and the Amazon, leading me to go there myself a year later, fearing she’d never return because she loved it so much there.

I’d given her a camera before she went, and was rewarded with some quite interesting photos, like these small motor boats that looked almost like slippers …

with straight shafts coming straight out of air-cooled engines.

During my trip up to the Rondout, I stopped in Newburgh, where replicas of La Niña and Pinta, crafted using traditional techniques on the Una River in Bahia, Brasil, attracted crowds, one of many stops along the great loop route. 

Other festivities on the Hudson that summer . . .

included the sails and music associated with the Clearwater Festival, and of course the small boats moving in some of the venues.

 

Patty Nolan and Augie were the small tugs, and of course the sailboats including Mystic Whaler, Woody Guthrie,

 

and of course the sloop Clearwater.  The Clearwater organization will not be doing a music festival in June 2022.  Mystic Whaler is now working in Oxnard CA at the Channel Islands Museum.

Summer time and the living is easy well, at least it feels that way some days . . . . 

All photos, except the first one, WVD.  That first photo was taken by Allan H. Seymour.

 

CB is obviously “Chicago bound.”

Neither Thomas D. Witte nor Clearwater here off Mount Beacon is that, but we were.

Meagan Ann headed south with

used and abused cars on

SMM 157 for the start of their last trip.

James William pushed several loads of building materials southbound.

Rebecca Ann turned around for her next trip.

Lisa Ann worked on the bulk heading project in Troy.

Frances moved a scow south, and

Ancient Mariner too moved on.

All photos by will Van Dorp, and this was Newburgh to Troy.

 

aka GHP&W 5

You saw the tug Cornell moving Clearwater to the Rondout in this post in late October.  But if you wondered how the Maine-built sloop was loaded, today’s your lucky day.  First, the truck comes to deliver the wood to support the keel on the barge before the

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Travelift moves Clearwater.  Along the left side of the photo, that’s Norman’s Kill near where it flows into the Hudson.

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When the blocking is ready, the Travelift moves down the tracks alongside the “pit”

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and final adjustments are made.

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Jacks provide stability.  Note the large green building in the background;  that’s Scarano Boat Building, where the Manhattans and many other vessels have been built.

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Click here to see the 3m31 sec YouTube of the process of getting the loaded barge out of the pit for the southbound trip to the Rondout.

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Many thanks to Paul Strubeck for these.

The Cornell (1950) with Clearwater (1969) on Hughes 141 photos come with thanks to Glenn Raymo.  The Hudson Valley is particularly beautiful this time of year, especially if you catch it in the right light, which of course is true everywhere.

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The other tugboats and landscapes in this post are mine.  In the KVK, Sarah Ann (2003) passes RTC 135 just as the morning sun clears a bank of low-lying clouds.

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An upriver-bound Navigator (1981) clears the Kills with HT 100 around the same hour.

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. . . passing lighthouses,

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gantry cranes, storage facilities,

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high ground, 

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and impossible towers.

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Many thanks to Glenn for use of his photos.  I’m sure Paul Strubeck plays a role here also.  And I took the photos of Sarah Ann and Navigator.

Here and here are some previous photos of Clearwater on its winter maintenance barge.

Here’s the index.

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Of course, it’s two boats, the sloop Clearwater tied up to the ex-NYC DEP skimmer Cormorant.  As I understand the situation, it’s on the market . . . again.

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I don’t know the date of this photo or the identity of the person showing scale.

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Dimensions are 114′ x 44′ x 10′

And here’s Clearwater pulling away.  But, before they cast off lines, their crew was on the dock checking

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this short nose sturgeon.  Now I can’t prove a connection between dead fish and TZ construction, but a few days ago I read this article at the Lohud site that included this paragraph:  “In June 2012, the fisheries service determined Tappan Zee construction would injure or kill some sturgeon but was “not likely to jeopardize the continued existence” of the fish. Under a federal permit issued to the Thruway Authority, two of each species can be killed during construction.”  I’m surprised such language exists in the paperwork.  And what happens if this limit is exceeded?

 

Well,  here’s another paragraph from the article:  “[Riverkeeper]  said 100 Atlantic and shortnose sturgeon have died since the start of construction in 2012. From 2009 to 2011, it said six sturgeon deaths were reported to the state Department of Environmental Conservation.”

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Here’s a statement of Cormorant‘s mission, now turned over to the USACE.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, back on June 12, 2015.

To start part 2, I’ll go back upriver a bit to Esopus Island.  Craig Eric Reinauer with RTC 103 is anchored to the south.  Much of the Hudson has  associated with some unusual characters, both in fiction and in real life.  Esopus Island is no exception:  about a century ago it was the magical hideaway of Aleister Crowley.  My friend Mitch–Newtown Pentacle–wrote about him here.

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Farther south is a place with a magical name but a quite mundane though necessary construction on it.  This is the current resident of Duyvil’s Danskammer Point, idled in litigation I think.  The Dutch called it “devil’s dance chamber” because they saw natives doing a ceremonial dance there by firelight . . .   A lighthouse and several brickworks also once stood here.

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Looking back upstream . .  the Newburgh-Beacon Bridge and Danskammer Point in the background.  Foreground is picnic boat Gem.  A Hinckley?

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River Rose previously appeared here about three years ago.

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Justine McAllister . . . I caught her the day before east- and then northbound at the KV buoy pushing RTC 120.  Also, three years ago I caught Justine towing the same barge on the Hudson.

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Upbound off Cornwall . .  it’s Kimberly Poling, also a frequenter of both this river and this blog.

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I’m not sure why so many large yachts were on the river the other day . . . off Bannerman’s Castle, location of a ceremonial swim a few months back, it’s Blue Moon.

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Here’s Bannerman’s from the south side, juxtaposing the residence (left) with the warehouse.

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I’ve yet to deliver on closeups of the residence, but here’s a preview.  The “picture window” serves to illustrate the interior for now.

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That’s Bannerman’s in the background as Black Watch passes northbound.  Slope on the right is dauntingly named Breakneck Ridge.

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The Hudson is truly loved.

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Here a crowded Clearwater lowers sail in the Hudson Highlands.

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Seastreak New York, usually shuttling south from the sixth boro, travels north when the leaves start to turn color.   Not pictured to the left is West Point.

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Peak behind Bear Mountain Bridge is Anthony’s Nose, which I scaled back in April.

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And finally . . . just south of the Bear Mountain Bridge . . . it’s another people mover usually associated with the confines of the sixth boro, Circle Line Queens, here assisting in leaf peeping.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was 9.

It seems that sailing just gets better as summer turns into fall.  Like Pioneer.   Click here for bookings via Water Taxi.

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America 2.0

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Shearwater

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Adirondack

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There are also those sailing vessels I’d like to see under sail.  Like Angel’s Share with its twin helms, here

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a close-up of the port helm.

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Slim Gunboat 6606

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with its Marshall Islands flag

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Heron . . . which I’ve seen as far south as Puerto Rico.

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Clipper City

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I’d love to find the time and invitations to sail on all those wind vessels.  But I actually did sail on Pioneer the other day.  Come with the vessel and crew as we leave the pier,

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ride the wind in a busy harbor for a few hours, and

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then lower sail before returning to the pier.

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All fotos taken this week by Will Van Dorp.  Time’s now for me to head out and enjoy more of this autumn air.

If anyone out there needs to be convinced of the beauty of the Hudson Valley less than 100 miles north of the big city, take a glance at this foto by Tim Hetrick showing tanker Icdas 11 escorted by a paparazzi savvy eagle.

The foto below shows sloop Clearwater in mid-June arriving at the music festival that shares the same name.

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A minute or so earlier . . . Clearwater rounded the bend following Woody Guthrie toward the shallows.

But if anyone has notions of operating a wooden vessel, it’s important to consider the regular maintenance.  Here was a post from about three years ago about work on Clearwater.  Currently way upriver this

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is happening again.  All the following fotos now come thanks to Paul Strubeck.  In mid-December, Clearwater was downrigged and hauled out near Albany at Scarano Boat Building and

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gently placed onto Black Diamond, with tug Cornell nearby.

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Securing the big sloop for travel takes care and time, more time than there is light at the winter solstice end of the year.

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But when all’s fast, the trip to where the winter maintenance crew can begin.

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Click here for an article about Clearwater‘s winter home in the shadow of the Hudson River Maritime Museum.

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Many thanks to Paul for sending these along.  It looks like I need to find time to get up to the Rondout.  The first two fotos in the post are mine.

Update:  May Day no more at South Street Seaport Museum, and I have sent my benjamins as promised.    As I understand it, the Museum has been “taken over” in some fashion by the Museum of the City of New York.     Below, Peter Stanford addressed a group of “save our seaport” supporters back in May.

Bravo to Save our Seaport for their efforts to pull together support.

Guess what this is?  A clue is this:  I took the foto back in November in Detroit.

This is related.  The Great Lakes are mostly devoid of commercial passenger traffic today, but a century ago, had my great-great grandparents lived and prospered along the “northern coast” of the US, deluxe cruise itineraries might include stops at Buffalo, Cleveland, Detroit.

Here, from the Dossin Museum is a model of what was marketed as THE way to cruise the Great Lakes around the time I was born.  Even the name of the aqua-hulled vessel,

SS Aquarama exudes that age of optimism.  Too bad I hadn’t  started this blog and contracted my obsession a decade or more earlier . . .  I would have been able to photograph her in mothballs in Buffalo.   Although it’s better late than never, when “stuff gets gone, it’s gone.”

So here’s the answer to my “whatzit” question . . . that place of carved oak above is the lounge on one of those Great Lakes passenger vessels:  City of Detroit III.  Who knows what honetmooners, retirees, or other celebrants smoked cigarettes (back when that was thought sophisticated)  and sipped drinks here.

Among the many great people I met this past year was Peter Boucher of Nautical Log.  Peter sent me this foto in response to a foto of Cove Isle, here.  Peter’s explanation of the foto below is as follows:  “When we were on the 1967 Western Arctic Patrol in CCGS Camsell  at one of the river stops this CCG river vessel came out to visit us.  Our Captain renamed it “Dimwit”, as it looked like it was going to turn over at any moment.”  Here’s another shot of Dumit.

I had to include this foto here:  this endless coal train travels along the bottom of the Great Lake called “Lake Maumee.”  Never heard of it?  It was there, though.  The day before Thanksgiving I waited a long time as this slow train moved prehistoric plant material along the bed of this prehistoric lake.

I also had the pleasure of meeting Jed this past year.  Thanks much for the tour of the Jacksonville area.

Blue Marlin captivated me this year, to put it mildly.  Here Clearwater, another worthy project if you’re still toying with year-end donations,  checks it out.

Here’s a foto from January 1, 2011:  Ann Moran glides on clouds beneath a heavenly bridge in charleston, SC.

Finally, it’s a cliche to end with a sunset pic, maybe, but I am so glad that a “cancelled trip” led me to visit Vieques as Plan B.  I’m hoping for more “plan b or even c” gallivants for 2012.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.  I hope to write again from Wilmington, NC.

The solstice happens in a week.  Is your household ready, mobilized.  Can you safely take it out onto the highways and wetways?

Thoughts of anything but summer . . .  with its adventures and gallivants . .. are elusive, for me.  Dana Spiotta writes of that in tomorrow’s NYTimes magazine, recounting a voyage on the Erie Canal by rowboat with Tide and Current Taxi‘s very own Marie Lorenz.    You could go fishing:  both Marlin and Minnow are currently in the sixth boro.

You could just go sit by the water and see all there’s to see.  I saw a classic loon yesterday–who dove before I could snap evidence.  This Corsair passed more slowly, less skittishly.

A week from now you could swim around Manhattan . . . or volunteer to keep swimmers safe by emailing cweber@nyc.org

You could swallow new herring and gin.  Here’s more info.

In a week you could go to the Clearwater Festival.

This foto from last year comes from Yen.  I know where, like these monks, I’m going . . . .

Next Saturday . . . the sea will again boil with hot blood and creatures rarely seen will emerge and parade.  It’s  the 29th

annual Mermaid Parade and Ball!!!

Thanks, Yen, for that foto.

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