You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Hudson River’ tag.

. . . the tugs, starting with . . .

Prospector,  built in Indiana 1982, 48′ x 6′ and 800 hp; and presumably the right stuff for this job.  Would you guess the location as the Hudson River from the photo immediately below?  Hook Mountain is a beauty that I really need to hike!

But back to Prospector, a name that connotes seeking gold in them thar  .. . places, and this place has truly seen the distribution of gold.

 

Imagine the stories Tarrytown Light could tell of her 130 years standing on the eastern side of the Hudson.

 

The new TZ is usually described in superlatives, here by the builders and here by states folks.

 

I’ve now driven and ridden over the bridge a number of times, but from there, the view is never as good as this.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who did the first post in this series here.

Click here for some views of the TZ Bridge area from eight years ago.

 

 

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Here are previous posts in this series.

Many thanks to Capt. Justin Zizes for these next six photos, all taken on November 6 during the transit of two Scarano schooners from NYC’s sixth boro up to Albany.

I would have joined as crew, but had obligations down river.  Here they glide under the TZ,

 

and northward . . . .

The highlands look positively fjord-like, because of course that is what that stretch of river is.

Here the boat approaches the bridges in Poughkeepsie.

Not quite a month ago–October 19–I caught another Scarano schooner up

by the Bear Mountain Brdge.

Unrelated:  Here’s an article on damage to insured recreational vessels from the hurricanes of 2017.

This view looks south at what for a short term will be two TZ Bridges.

Lurking around the supports is the Tappan Zee II, bridge-dedicated tugboat, profiled a year and a half ago here.

 

At some point soon, the bridge to the right will be gone.

I’ve read the new TZ Bridge has a projected lifespan of a century.  What will the shoreline look like in 2117?

Where will the Left Coast Lifter lift next?

And here’s the current view looking northward.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

More on the TZ construction can be found here, thanks to William A. Hyman.

From this angle, Fort Lee–birthplace of the motion-picture industry– looks quite pristine.  Yes, that’s the west tower of the GW Bridge.  Am I correct in thinking the marketing name of the twin towers in the distance is the Moderns 1 and 2?

And on the subject of “towers” that Ocean Tower, a name I never know how to pronounce, as I first raised the question here over nine years ago.

Here’s the tow I saw last week.

 

Judging from the barge name TZC-102,  these bridge supports will undergird parts of the TZ Bridge, the completion of this huge project will soon transform into a huge sale of assets.

And where are these supports pre-cast?

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who thinks you might enjoy this recent Scientific America article on suspension v. cable-stay bridges.

Oh the stories this place could tell . . . in years as stable and livery, bar, hotel, photography unit, and residence;  it could tell stories of our mutual friend Sam.  More on Sam later.

And oh the stories Lucy H could tell about her odyssey from the bayous all the way to Troy . . .

 

where we two crossed paths on this beautiful autumn day.

 

As the sun set, Betty D showed up as well, a similar story to tell, no doubt.  And I’m wondering what’s the story with the far bank?  As I recall,

that was covered in volunteer under- and overgrowth, which seems to have been cut recently.

If I read my map right, the far bank there is Watervliet, birthplace of Leland Stanford and home of an arsenal with a notable iron building.

As night falls, Betty D makes her way northward under the Green Island Bridge.

 

I didn’t forget:  here’s Sam.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp.

 

Different day . . . different character . . .  the Hudson can have thick patches of fog, which

allow Dorothy J to slip past structures on a mysterious shore.

Farther along, Miss Gill guards some incongruous piles of

coal that surely did not arrive through the Delaware and Hudson Canal, which I visited recently but didn’t dip my foot into.

Wendell Sea waits alongside a fuel barge, and

Christiana–not a frequent visitor in the sixth boro–does in her own way

up by the GW Bridge.

 

Helen Laraway stands by scows of different sized crushed stone.

And this gets us down to the sixth boro.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Yesterday’s post requires a complement, so here it is.  The flight out was less turbulent but equally rewarding for folks looking out the window.  Behold the Tappan Zee.  This stretch of the river–from Piermont “pier” (created by the Erie RR) on the west side of the Hudson to Croton Point on the east and a little margin on either side represents approximately 10 statute miles, by my estimate.  Rockland Lake,  directly across the river from Croton Point and usually obscured by Hook Mountain just south of Haverstraw, can clearly be seen here.

Here’s the next stretch of river from Croton Point north and almost to Poughkeepsie.  That’s about 40 statute miles, as the crow flies.  By slow boat, that’s the better part of a winter’s day.  Note the long skinny reservoir,  DeForest Lake, at the 4 o’clock point of the photo.

From my seat on the starboard side, I was hoping for a glimpse of Lake Ontario, but this is way beyond my hopes:  despite the clouds, a clear view of the 27-mile Welland Canal from Port Colbourne on Lake Erie below to Port Weller on Lake Ontario above.

Last summer we exited here, near the MRC scrapyard at Port Colbourne just after 1600 after having entered the Welland Canal

here at Port Weller, just before 0900 that day . . . so the aerial above represents a day’s traverse through the Welland locks, with no delays.

By this time, I was starting to think the pilot of this aircraft must have wanted to be credited on this blog, for as we headed into Detroit airport, he gave me this final treat:  a view of the 740′  Algoma Harvester upbound through the cutoff leaving marshy Walpole Island to starboard and the more substantial Seaway Island, ON to its port. The natural flow of the St Clair River–and the international border– is along the far side of Seaway and Miller, MI.

My week away involved another flight, a long drive, and then the flight with my camera–not my phone.  Since I’m on an aerial fling, I’ll share some of those tomorrow.  Below is a sample, for you to savor if you want to guess my destination.

 

 

Let me start to play catch up here, since I have not done one of these posts in over half a year.  Anyone know why HMCS St. John’s (FHH-340) steamed into the sixth boro yesterday, Thanksgiving Day?  To assist this 45′ USCG response vessel and all the land-based law enforcement in keeping order on the so-called “black friday” chaos, perhaps?

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USNS GySgt. Fred W. Stockham (T-AK-3017) was waiting in the anchorage,possibly for a berth at GMD Bayonne. The vessel namesake had an interesting set of deployments.

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Icebreaker Penobscot Bay (WTGB-107) headed upriver a half month ago, but there was no imminent ice formation at that time, unless one traveled  well north of Inukjuak, but it would take some extraordinary turn-of-events for WTGB-107 to deploy there.

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The sixth boro has a number of these 29′ patrol craft.

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And to close out today’s post, USACE Moritz passes the evolving Rockefeller University campus expansion just north of the Queensboro Bridge.

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All photos in the past month by Will Van Dorp.

 

I hope you’ve enjoyed the “whatzit” series as much as I do.  The photo below I took on October 22, 2016.  A minute or so earlier, I was thinking we were about to meet some traffic.  At this point I realized there were islands where I’d no recollection of seeing islands.  So what is it?

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Here’s a similar “island,” photo taken on November 14, 2016.  In the Thousand Islands, such a small island with at least three trees would not have been out of place, but here . . .   ?

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Until I saw this, and a few seconds later . . .

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this.   By the way, these photos were taken not far north of Saugerties.

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These camouflaged hunting platforms reminded me of some hunters we waked a few years back on Urger.  You can’t slow down if you don’t see the reason to.  Once we waked a few in a boat right along the bank–no photos because we didn’t see anything until we had passed by–we learned to “see” them and respond.

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Here are a few we spotted in time.

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We saw this guy, but he kept paddling madly as if to race us, all while keeping his face turned away.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who reiterates his suggestion from yesterday here:

“If you are working Thursday and therefore having lunch and/or dinner at work–whether on a vessel or in some other work setting–and you choose to take a photo of the dinner–any aspect of the meal–and send it to me, please do and I’ll try to devise a post with it on Friday this week.  Thanks for the consideration.”

On the cusp of wintriness if not winter per se, the Hudson Valley is spectacular.  Let’s start with Fred Johannsen pushing this crane barge northward.  That’s the Kingston-Rhinecliff Bridge aka George Clinton Memorial Bridge (DeWitt Clinton’s uncle)  in the distance.

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Here Treasure Coast urges Cement Transporter 7700–one I’ve never seen before–the last mile to the cement dock.

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This reflection was so magical, I needed to include this closer-up.

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Emerald Coast pushes a fuel barge downstream.

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Sarah D moves a motley pair of scows upstream.

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Eastern Dawn moves a fuel barge downstream.

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Mr Russell shifts a barge near the TZ Bridge.  What is in those tanks?

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Might that be Marion Moran pushing sugar barge Somerset up toward Yonkers?

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I believe this is Doris Moran moving cement barge Adelaide downriver.

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And as a last-but-not-least photo today, here’s Cornell conducting a TOAR sign off session.  Here’s a post I did three years ago with the same activity but using a different barge.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has a proposal below:

If you are working Thursday and therefore having lunch and/or dinner at work–whether on a vessel or in some other work setting–and you choose to take a photo of the dinner–any aspect of the meal–and send it to me, please do and I’ll try to devise a post with it on Friday this week.  Thanks for the consideration.

Also, you may be “choosing” ed out by now, but here’s a set of thoughtful, well-reasoned and -articulated perspectives on the Hudson anchorages question that is open to public discussion until early December.

Also, if you’re planning to be at the WorkBoat show in New Orleans next week,  I’ll be wandering around there, maybe looking for some extra work.  I hope to see you.

 

 

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