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I hope you all enjoy looking at these retro posts as much as I do putting them together.  I’m seeing that 2010 was the year I started to gallivant extensively, so the division for July 2010 retrospective is part a is for local, and part b will be for away.

Count the boats in the photo below!  Greenland Sea is prominent, but in the distance, find a Staten Island ferry, QM2, Susan (?) Miller, a dredge operation where I see Rae, and a Reinauer tug (Ruth?) beyond that!  Greenland Sea is now on the hard in Houma LA, the SI ferries run regularly but with fewer passengers due to the covid catastophes, QM2 is in Southampton, the Miller boats are still busy, Rae is kept in reserve for special projects designed for a 46′ tug, navigation dredging is over for now, and the Reinauer tugs have proliferated and keep busy.

Navigation dredging has created deeper channels, and the Bayonne Bridge has been raised.  Miss Gill is now in Jacksonville FL, and GL 55, the dumper scow, is wherever work may require her.

The formerly-yellow submarine is located at the entrance to Coney Island Creek, a place I’ve not been to in almost a decade.

I never did identify the wrecks at the mouth of said Creek, which seemed then to have an abundance of blue-clawed crabs.

Jane A. Bouchard languishes along with the rest of the fleet, and Cape Cod, with one of the intra-port SSS barges here,  has moved to Philly, last I knew.

Barbara McAllister pushes B. No. 262 with an assist from Ron G.  Barbara has not been in the sixth boro in quite a while, the 262 is laid up, and Ron G has been sold south.

Cape Race arrives here in Atlantic Basin, with a much-changed lower Manhattan skyline.  The former fishing trawler/now expedition yacht is currently on the Elbe, south of Hamburg.

Margot still “keeps on pushing,” although I’ve not seen her down in the sixth boro of late.

And here, Patty Nolan passes a wreck–I’ve not yet identified it . . .  maybe you have–inside Sommerville Basin in coastal Queens. Patty Nolan has been on the hard a few years.

And here’s a photo taken exactly a decade ago today . . .  an unnamed houseboat being towed from Peekskill to Queens, not a view you see every day.  It’s Patty Nolan towing with gatelines.  Here and here she tows other houseboats.

All photos, WVD, who wishes everyone health and patience in this difficult time.  Also, these “retro sixth boro” posts take us back only one decade.  It’d be great to locate more photos of identifiable locations going back 50 or so years, the fifth dimension of time photos.

 

Recently I got a request for something on single screw tugs.  Ask . .  and receive, from the archives.

May 1, 2011  . .  the 1901 Urger was on the dry dock wall in Lyons looking all spiffy.  A month later, she’d be miles away and alive.

On March 19, 2010, the 1907 Pegasus had all the work done she was scheduled for, and the floating dry dock is sinking here.  In 10 minutes, Pegasus would be afloat and a yard tug … draw her out.

On a cold day last winter, a shot of the 1912 Grouper, in dry dock, waiting for a savior.   If you’re savvy and have deep reservoirs of skill and money, you can likely have her cheap.

In that same dry dock, the 1926 boxy superstructure DeWitt Clinton.

To digress, here’s how her much-lower clearance looked when first launched in Boothbay.

Back on July 30, 2017, I caught the 1929 Nebraska getting some life-extension work.   Unlike the previous single screw boats, Nebraska has a Kort nozzle surrounding its prop, which clearly is away getting some work done on it also.

On February 10, 2010, the 1931 Patty Nolan was on the hard.  She was put back in, but currently she’s back on the hard, with plans to float her again this summer.

A CanalCorp boat, I believe this is Dana, was in dry dock in Lyons this past winter.  If so, she’s from 1935.

As you’ve noticed, single screw tugs have sweet elliptical sterns.  All painted up and ready to splash, they are things of beauty.  On December 16, 2006, I caught the 1941 Daniel DiNapoli, ex-Spuyten Duyvil, about to re-enter her element.

Also in dry dock but not ready to float, on March 10, 2010, the 1958 McAllister Brothers, ex-Dalzelleagle is getting some TLC.

Is it coincidence that so many of these single screw boats are   . . . aged?  Nope.  Twin- and triple-screw boats can do many more things.  Is it only because the regulations have changed?  Have any single-screw tugs been built in recent years?  Are single-screw boat handling skills disappearing in this age of twin- and triple-screw boats?  No doubt.

All photos by WVD, who enjoyed this gallivant through the archives.

And speaking of archives, Mr Zuckerberg reminded me this morning that nine years ago exactly, the sixth boro was seeing the complicated lading of the tugs and barges being taken by heavylift ship to West Africa.  There were so many challenges that I called the posts “groundhog day” like the movie about a guy having to use many many “re-do’s” before he could get it right.

 

Remember the logic in this series is . . . the first pic of the month and the last pic of the month . . .

Early September found me still along the Acushnet . . .  Malena–as of this writing–is in Sierra Leone, having bounced around the Caribbean since departing New Bedford.

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By September’s end, Wavertree was slathered in a beautiful red primer.

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Early October . . . that’s North Star off the Orient Point, and Plum Gut, with Plum Island in the background.

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Late October . . . a conversation led to an invitation to tour iMTT Bayonne and see Marion Moran at the tug fuel station from the waterside.  I still need to post about that.

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November . . . and Med Sea bound for the Sound and beyond.

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Joyce D. Brown going back to the kills.

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And late in the month, my only view of Patty Nolan, on the hard in Verplanck. Click here for some of many posts on the 1931 Patty.

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Early December . . .it’s mild and I decided to experiment with some color separation on Margaret Moran. Click here for a post from seven-plus years ago with Margaret Moran  . . .

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And since December has not yet ended, I will post this in its incomplete state, with the promise of a “last December 2015”  post yet to come.

This is my last post for 2015.  Happy New Year.  May it be peaceful and safe.

World’s End is not some lamentation about the single digit temperatures we’ve seen in these parts;  it’s one of the great place names in the Hudson Highlands from 40 to 55 miles north of the the Statue.  Enjoy these summer/winter pics of this curve in the vicinity of World’s End.  West Point is just to the left, and we’re headed north.

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Birk Thomas–of tugboat information.com– took this photo in just about the same place less than a week ago.

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I took this two summers ago, and that’s Pollepel Island in the distance.

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Same place . . . Birk’s photo from last week.  Visibility is so restricted that the Island cannot be seen.

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And here are two more shots of the same view in summer, from off Cornell and

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Patty Nolan. That’s Buchanan 12 heading north in the photo below.

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Photos 2 and 4 used with thanks to Birk Thomas.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s a previous post with this title.

For anyone venturing upriver, no landmark is more intriguing than Pollepel Island, 50 miles north of the Battery.  But it’s changing.   Note this difference between these fotos I’ve taken over the past decade.

2003, as seen from the Channel, looking roughly east. Notice the lower wall and the upper wall with four sides, which I’ll call west, north, and east and south sides not visible.

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earlier this August 2013 as seen from Patty Nolan from the same approximate location.  Notice that the upper structure NOW has only a west-facing wall.  Unrelated to this landmark, but you can see the photographer in the mirror.

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Here’s an August 2013 closer-up, showing the upper west wall only.

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Here are the south and east walls as seen from the land looking west in spring 2007.  The east wall is now all gone, as is a large portion of the south wall . . . here bathed in the most sunlight.

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Same vantage point… south and east walls, as seen from MetroNorth train later in the spring 2008.

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And another view of the west and north walls from fall 2008.

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The island is off limits, but you can get a tour via Bannerman Castle Trust, Inc.

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I took the tour yesterday.  Here’s the south wall.  Compare what remains of the stairs here with what you could see in the 2007 and 2008 fotos.  Click here for more before/after views.

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Closer-up of those stairs.  Notice the metal tubing near lower right side of the foto?

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Here’s that metal tubing, remnants of a drawbridge.

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More of the south side.  Bannerman saw architectural cannonballs as his logo, and they are everywhere.

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Balls and balls and more balls.

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Here are closer-ups of the north and west walls.   Scaffolding will soon appear here, as attempts are made to keep these facades from crumbling as well.

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More cannonballs.

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Reportedly, these “balls” are cementaceous orbs stuck onto surplus bayonets embedded in the brick.  I can’t verify this story, but Bannermans business was Army/Navy surplus, which his father started while the family lived near the Brooklyn Navy Yard.  Click here to see a six-minute video of their 1927 catalog;  if you generally click on no  links in this blog, this one is worth it.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who plans at least another Bannermans Island psot soon.

You may have seen this foto sequence yesterday of Orlando Duque diving from a helicopter near the Statue of Liberty?  Well . .  more on the foto below later in this post, but the diver here is in fact she who inspired my post today by her instructions on how to swim from a schooner . . . a few years back.

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If you’ve looked at bowsprite’s link above, you’ll notice that my instructions begin differently.

1.  Choose your location, and few locations are as enticing to me as the Hudson north of the Bear Mountain Bridge, where I hiked a few months back.

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2.  Select a tugboat.  Buchanan 12, here managing eight stone scows just below Breakneck Ridge,  is photogenic but absolutely the wrong choice for this.

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Nor should you choose Kimberly Poling, here headed southbound on the Hudson in the same bends.

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Patty Nolan, however, fits the specs perfectly.  You may remember Patty here  from a few years back looking just a little different and facing a dilemma.

3.  Here’s where I concur with bowsprite’s first item:  find a captain who will let you off the boat.    We did.  The dock worker here belongs to the blue-hatted union.

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And off we go in search of an anchorage.  Now I know that since contemporary life comes with an infinite lists of troubles and limitations,  to relax . . . and celebrate life  . . . you gotta do it!

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The mature days of summer demand celebration.

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4.  Anchor in a safe location.  Bannerman, haunting in springtime, seems more welcoming in late summer.

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5.  Check the equipment.  Will Patty the figure figure be enticed to come up out of her cabin by this gold lamé?

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6.  Set up the sturgeoncam

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and deploy

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the crane.

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7.  Swim . . . without the strap or

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or with, in a variety of entrance styles.

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8.  Board the boat when the day is done . . . if you can figure out how.  I need to work on that one.  Or sturgeoncam here might have to swim down the Hudson . . . .  In late summer, that’s not a bad option.

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Would you believe this waterspotted lens proves I followed Patty and crew all the way back to Bear Mountain?

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Do you think I’d conclude this post without a video of tugster swinging from the crane?  Click on the foto to see.

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Don’t let Labor Day find you without a Hudson River dip in your experience.

By the way, from the local paper, one of my favorite weekly columns,  twelve places you should also visit in the Hudson Valley. 

The event is called Clearwater’s Great Hudson River Revival, so indeed, it’s a water festival, a river fest  started by a folksinger, now 93,  who cares deeply about

the river that flowed past his birthplace.  A river festival means boats.

Of course, Clearwater in the distance is the flagship of this festival, and the big sloop spawned the smaller sloop Woodie Guthrie closer in.

The festival takes place on a peninsula where you see the tents in the middle of the foto.

It’s called Croton Point Park, about 30 miles north of Manhattan’s north tip.

But this location is surrounded by shallow water, so temporary docks are needed, which means small shallow draft tugboats like Augie (1943 and on the first job of her new life) and

Patty Nolan (1931 and available for charter). . .   And the red barge is Pennsy 399 (1942!!) .

Also taking passengers during the festival is Mystic Whaler, here with Hook Mountain in the distance.

Here’s the northside of Croton Point last evening looking toward Haverstraw.

Exactly five years ago I took this foto from a small boat just off Pioneer‘s bowsprit.   Here are more fotos from that day.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who might go back for some music tomorrow.

The first time I saw Patty was on the foto here (fifth one) although when Jed sent that foto, neither he nor I could identify it.    Ultimately I met Patty and her guardians (She accepts no other terms.)  About two years ago I had the good fortune of crewing for a similar tow.  Sunday I happened to glance at AIS and saw this blip just west of SeaGate/Norton Point, which told me to mobilize the hot air balloon/photography team**.

As we zoomed in, we caught Patty and tow . . .with West Bank Light in the distance, and …

the Parachute Jump off to port her port.

This has all the appearance of a “Patchogue floating home”  coming across

the west end of Jamaica Bay, with its antipodes Breezy Point to the left and Norton Point to the right.  For a post I did two years ago about the fascinating but incongruous wildlife in Jamaica Bay, click here.

For you outatowners, Patty and house are traversing the sixth boro, that central previously-unnamed core

of New York City, with its Barren Island-turned-airfield-turned-Barren Island Park and

its distant views of Manhattan cliffs, and its

other 32 islands in Jamaica Bay alone.  This too is Brooklyn!

And looking over into Queens and then Long Island, that in the distance is JFK (ex-Idlewild) Airport.  After delivering its tow, Patty races

back upriver with a favorable tide.

**Oh . . . I lied about the hot air balloon.  A total fabrication . . . a shameless bit of dissembling that was, but it sounds so much more exciting than the prosaic “I hurried to southern Brooklyn for a shot from Gil Hodges Bridge.”

The final shot here of Patty in stealth mode trying to blending into April foliage . . . thanks to bowsprite.  All others by Will Van Dorp, virtual hot-air balloonist photographer.

Someone asked why Patty has an awning:  in addition to commercial tows, she does picnic charters!!  A virtual Patty-of-all-trades.

I did this post just over a year ago; note the prominent change happening in the Manhattan skyline, as seen from the north coast of Rockaway Queens.  The last time you saw the tug shown here was December 2011.  Any guesses what Patty was towing yesterday?  Answer tomorrow.

Most of my views of the rising tower come from my “office” on the north coast of Staten Island.  It looms there, beyond these McAllisters,

Na Hoku,

Caitlin Ann,

Magothy,

Penn No. 6,

Thomas J. Brown,

Norwegian Sea,

JoAnne Reinauer III,

Hayward,

Elk River,

and Resolute.

Unrelated:  Following their own landmarks, a new crop of aeons-old silvery slime has reportedly returned to sixth boro waterways.    What . . . you ask?  Click here.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Maria J. Turecamo (1968)  and Hercules  (1961), side by side, and my psychic tells me Hercules may be about to set out on a long cold journey, over water.   Given the name, I’m inclined to wonder what Hercules 12 labors were/are and where on that list this journey fits.

Scott Turecamo (1998) and

Reinauer Twins (2011) wait with their respective barges.  Twins holds the distinction of being the newest tug in the sixth boro.

Norwegian Sea (1976) waits, but

Meredith C. Reinauer (2003) is on the move, as

is McKinley Sea (1981).

And most of them could carry Augie on davits as a tender.  Anyone know the age of Augie, here at a dock upriver?

Finally, another foto of Byrce Kirk operating Patty Nolan (1931) and still running.

Foto of Augie by Dave Williams, Patty Nolan by Seth Tane, and all others by Will Van Dorp.

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